Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This. This is the image that has been stuck in my mind for years.

    これだ。これは私の心に何年もあって、離れないイメージ。

  • Here I was below the massive towers of the Tokyo metropolitan government building and I came across this blue tarp with solar panels on it.

    私は、巨大な東京都庁舎の下にいて、ソーラーパネルがある青色のテントに出くわしました。

  • This was quite a scene for me.

    私にとって驚くべき光景でした。

  • That's because back in Vancouver, where I lived most of my adult life, I was used to seeing scenes like this.

    私が大人になってからほとんどの時間を過ごしたバンクーバーでは、このような光景が普通でした。

  • Why were the visible homeless I encountered in Tokyo so different?

    私が東京で出会った明らかなホームレスはなぜそんなに違うのか?

  • Thus started my search into understanding why the homeless in Japan are different than the homeless in North America.

    それゆえ、日本のホームレスは北アメリカのホームレスとなぜ違うのか理解するために探究を始めました。

  • Where I started to find answers was in the research work of professor Tom Gill.

    トム・ギル教授の研究活動の中にその答えを見つけ始めました。

  • My name is Tom Gill, I'm from England.

    私の名前はトム・ギルです。英国出身です。

  • But I've lived in Japan for about 25 years and I'm a professor of Social Anthropology

    しかし私は日本に25年間住んでいて、明治学院大学の横浜キャンパスで、

  • here at Meiji Gakuin University, Yokohama Campus.

    社会人類学の教授をしています。

  • There are a number of things about Japanese society

    他の産業国に比べて、日本社会は、

  • which makes it a lot easier to deal with homelessness than in other industrialized countries.

    ホームレス対策を比較的しやすくする点がいくつかあります。

  • For a start,

    始めに、

  • the level of drug abuse is much lower in Japan

    薬物乱用レベルが他の多くの国と比べて、日本はかなり低い。

  • than a lot of other countries. It's pretty difficult to get hold of hard drugs in Japan unless you know a Yakuza,

    日本では、ハードドラッグを手に入れるのがかなり難しい。

  • a gangster who will supply you.

    提供してれる暴力団員、ヤクザがいない限りは。

  • And for the most part guys who become homeless in Japan

    なので日本でホームレスになる人の大部分は

  • don't do drugs other than tobacco and alcohol.

    タバコやアルコール以外のドラッグをしない。

  • Yes, there are a substantial number of

    確かに、日本のホームレス人口のうち

  • alcoholics in the Japanese homeless population.

    かなりの人数がアルコール中毒です。

  • There are also a considerable number of

    ギャンブルに取り憑かれた人もかなりの数います。

  • compulsive gamblers and of course, even if you are getting Livelihood Protection Money,

    生活保護のお金を受け取っていても、月の始めの数日で

  • if you spend it all on alcohol or horse racing in the first couple of days of the month,

    アルコールや馬券に全て使ってしまったら、

  • you can still end up on the street.

    路頭に迷うことになります。

  • Another important factor is that Japan has a very conservative approach

    他の重要な要素としては、日本は施設に入っている

  • To treatment of mentally ill people,

    精神病の人々に対して

  • who are generally institutionalized.

    非常に保守的なアプローチをしていることです。

  • If you look at statistics for mental health in Japan,

    日本でのメンタルヘルスに関する統計を見ると、

  • you are much more likely to be put away in an institution

    メンタルヘルスに問題があると、施設に入れられる傾向が

  • if you have a mental health problem.

    高いことがわかります。

  • We never went through the processes

    アメリカでは「主流」と呼ばれる過程や

  • that were called "mainstreaming" in America

    英国の「コミュニティでのケア」を

  • and "care in the community" in Britain

    経験したことがありません。

  • which are both kind of code words for shutting down mental Hospitals and

    それはどちらも精神病院を閉めることを意味する隠語で、

  • Letting mentally ill people out into society and

    精神病の人を社会に出すということは、

  • Which might have seemed like a good idea and something-

    良い考えのように思えるし、

  • some liberal people did support that move but unfortunately

    その動きを支援する自由主義の人もいます。しかし、残念なことに、

  • there wasn't the backup to follow what happened to these people after they were let out

    社会に出てから、これらの人々を支える後ろ盾が何もなく、

  • and a certain number of them ended up being on the streets,

    そのうちの何人かが、道端で生活するようになる。

  • and that's one of the reasons why you have a lot of people with mental health issues

    これが多くの産業国で、ホームレス人口のうち、

  • in the homeless population in many Industrialized countries.

    メンタルヘルスに問題がある人が多い1つの理由です。

  • Then a third factor is that Japan has managed to

    3つ目の要因は、第二次世界大戦後、日本は戦争や紛争とは

  • keep out of wars and conflicts since the end of World War II.

    無縁であるということです。

  • So as a result, traumatized war veterans, which are another large component

    結果として、アメリカのホームレス人口で大きな割合を占める

  • particularly of the American homeless population-

    トラウマを持った退役軍人が、

  • we don't have that in Japan either.

    日本にはいない。

  • Where are homeless people?

    ホームレスの人たちはどこにいるのか?

  • Urban parks,

    郊外の公園、

  • riverbanks,

    川の土手、

  • streets,

    路上、

  • station buildings,

    駅構内、

  • and other buildings.

    その他の建物。

  • So the kind of archetypal situation

    典型的な状況としては、

  • where you're walking along the street and you encounter a homeless person is

    道を歩いていて、ホームレスの人に出会うことは、日本ではあまりありません。

  • a lot less likely to happen in Japan because a lot of them are not in that part of the urban space.

    なぜなら、都市空間にいるホームレスが少ないからです。

  • Most of them do try to keep clean. One of the reasons why they tend to gather in parks is because they

    多くのホームレスが清潔を保とうとします。彼らが公園に集まりやすい理由の1つが、

  • generally have public toilets and washrooms there which helps you to maintain a basic level of hygiene.

    公園にはたいてい公衆トイレや洗面所があり、基本的な清潔を保つことができるからです。

  • On the question of begging:

    物乞いに関する質問

  • it's true that very few homeless people in Japan beg.

    日本のホームレスで物乞いをする人が少ないというのは事実です。

  • Far more likely, as a way of making a bit of money, is can recycling,

    それより、ちょっとしたお金を稼ぐ方法として、空き缶のリサイクルをします。

  • and sometimes newspaper and magazine recycling,

    ときに、新聞や雑誌のリサイクルも。

  • but that's the main way for putting together a little bit of cash.

    それがちょっとしたお金を集める主な方法です。

  • Why they don't beg? I think there are push factors and pull factors.

    なぜ物乞いをしないのか?そこにはプッシュ要因とプル要因があります。

  • Japanese are disinclined to beg.

    日本人は物乞いする気がない。

  • They're also disinclined to give to beggars, and these two things go hand in hand.

    物乞いする人にあげる気がない。これら2つが密接に関係しています。

  • In countries with a strong Christian tradition, or indeed a strong Muslim, or Hindu tradition,

    キリスト教、イスラム教、ヒンズー教の伝統が強い国では、

  • giving to the Poor is deeply ingrained in the religion and the culture.

    貧しい人にあげることは、それらの宗教や文化で深く染みついています。

  • There's nothing quite like that in in Japan so

    日本では、全くそんなことはないので、

  • People are less likely to give money to beggars.

    物乞いする人たちにお金をあげる人は少ない。

  • I mean, they're not used to being begged off. It's a "chicken-and-egg" situation, really.

    つまり、物乞いされることに慣れていない。「卵が先か鶏が先か」の状況です。

  • The fact that

    実際に、

  • you know, it's shameful to beg and

    物乞いをすることは恥ずかしいですね。

  • you don't want people to know that you're homeless

    ホームレスだと他の人に知られたくない。

  • you don't want people to know that you're unable to look after yourself.

    自分のことが自分でできないなんて誰かに知られたくない。

  • Pride, shame. Yeah, these are also factors

    プライド、恥ずかしさ、それらも要因です。

  • I'm sure you have many questions about homelessness in Japan and I did as well.

    日本のホームレスについてたくさんの疑問があることでしょう。私もそうでした。

  • It's a very complex topic that touches on many parts of society.

    社会の多くの部分に触れる非常に複雑なトピックです。

  • As such, this is just a single video as part of a bigger series about homelessness in Japan that I'll be making,

    この動画は、日本のホームレスシリーズのうちの1つの動画にすぎません。

  • so stay tuned for that.

    だからこれからお楽しみに。

  • I have to give special thanks to professor Tom Gill, who's so

    トム・ギル教授に心から感謝します。

  • knowledgeable and so generous with his time, so thank you for that!

    知識が深く、寛容にも時間を割いてくれました。ありがとうございます!

  • And a shout out to my patreon supporters who make It possible for me to make videos like this;

    それから、私が動画を作ることを可能にしてくれたサポーターの人たちにも感謝。

  • videos that aren't necessarily so popular and videos that do take time to research,

    必ずしも人気があるとは言えない動画や、研究に時間を要する動画などを

  • so thank you for that and as always:

    作ることができたので、感謝します。そしていつものように、

  • Thanks for Watching!

    見てくれてありがとう!

  • See you next time, Bye!

    また次回。バイバイ!

This. This is the image that has been stuck in my mind for years.

これだ。これは私の心に何年もあって、離れないイメージ。

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 ホームレス 日本 ヘルス 動画 トム アルコール

日本のホームレスはなぜ北米と違うのか(前編 (Why Japan's Homeless are Different from North America's (Part 1))

  • 88 7
    Kana kawai に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語