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  • DAVE MARX: Carmine's a highly-regarded author

  • in the business world, who recently published his eighth

  • book, "The Storyteller's Secret--

  • From TED Speakers to Business Legends,

  • Why Some Ideas Stick and Others Don't."

  • Carmine's currently an author, columnist, and public speaker,

  • and has formally worked as a journalist and news anchor.

  • But I think, above all, Carmine is a storyteller.

  • His previous books had been massive hits.

  • His book, "The Innovation Secrets of Steve Jobs,"

  • also became an international bestseller,

  • and has been awarded the Axiom Award

  • for being one of the top three best business books in 2011.

  • And just today, Amazon Editor shows most recent book,

  • "The Storyteller's Secret," as one of the best new books

  • in business and leadership.

  • It's available everywhere now.

  • And we've been lucky enough to have some subsidized copies

  • through Google Talks that will be available for sale

  • in the back.

  • And I'm sure Carmine would be happy to sign

  • your copy for you, if you're willing to stick around

  • for a couple minutes after the talk.

  • So with that, I'd like to introduce the man himself,

  • Carmine Gallo.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • CARMINE GALLO: All right.

  • All right, thank you.

  • Good morning.

  • I am really passionate about this topic.

  • And I'm passionate about it because I really

  • think that this is a topic that will help you in your careers,

  • help you in your business, make you more valuable than you've

  • ever imagined.

  • And it'll also help you sell your ideas more effectively.

  • So since we're talking about storytelling,

  • why don't we begin with a story?

  • Now, stop me if you've heard this before.

  • Two Stanford graduate students think

  • they've come up with an idea to change the world.

  • So they had over to Sequoia Capital, to ask for money.

  • Michael Moritz, one of the investors, the main investor

  • at Sequoia Capital, has been watching an endless stream

  • of really bad PowerPoints.

  • And Sergey and Larry do something different.

  • First, they have a working demo, which was really unusual

  • at that time.

  • It actually worked.

  • What a concept.

  • But they also did something very interesting.

  • They were able to summarize their entire vision

  • in one short sentence of under 10 words.

  • And Michael Moritz never forgot that.

  • And that sentence is "We organize

  • the world's information and make it accessible."

  • I spoke to Michael Moritz last year.

  • And he said, Carmine, tell your clients,

  • tell your groups that great leaders can do two things.

  • One, they have a vision for the future.

  • But they can communicate it especially well.

  • And so now, even today, if you walk

  • into Sequoia Capital's offices, they're

  • asking you for the one line.

  • And one investor told me, if you cannot summarize your idea

  • in one sentence, we're not interested.

  • Go back to the drawing board.

  • Because there's power in simplicity.

  • And there's power in articulating your ideas simply

  • and concisely.

  • When it comes to storytelling, especially, we

  • kind of know how this works.

  • Kevin Spacey said, "Story is everything and good content

  • making--" whether that's in business, marketing, or movies,

  • "--is not a crap shoot.

  • We know how this works."

  • There is a formula to this.

  • We know how persuasion works.

  • We know why you remember certain things

  • and why you forget others.

  • There's a formula to this.

  • In the music industry, for example, 90% of music revenues

  • come from 10% of the songs.

  • And this is a true statistic.

  • It's actually in a new book called "The Song Machine."

  • What's amazing about this is that the 10%

  • are written by a handful of people.

  • One guy in particular, is Max Martin,

  • who made it big with Britney Spears, Backstreet Boys.

  • And today, he write songs for pretty much all the other big

  • pop artists out there-- most of the songs that you hear,

  • the songs that you like, the ones that are memorable.

  • Because there's a formula to it.

  • He knows what works.

  • He uses something called track and hook.

  • So how many of you have had a Taylor Swift

  • song stuck in your head over the last year?

  • It's got three words.

  • What would it be?

  • What is it?

  • What is the three-word song?

  • What is it?

  • AUDIENCE: "Shake it Off."

  • CARMINE GALLO: "Shake it Off." "Shake it Off."

  • Thank you, Max Martin, who wrote that.

  • He knows how these things work.

  • We know how this works in communication too.

  • So in the 20th Century, give me one or two

  • of the most famous speeches of the 20th Century.

  • Name one.

  • AUDIENCE: I Had a Dream.

  • CARMINE GALLO: How did I know you were going to say that?

  • How did I know?

  • I Have a Dream speech.

  • And what is the most memorable part of the I

  • Have a Dream speech?

  • I have a dream.

  • That's called anaphora.

  • That's a rhetorical device that makes

  • something pleasing to the ear.

  • We know how this works.

  • What's the most famous line from John Kennedy's

  • inaugural speech?

  • AUDIENCE: Ask not what your--

  • CARMINE GALLO: --country can do for you.

  • What's the rest of it?

  • AUDIENCE: But what you can do for your country.

  • CARMINE GALLO: But what you can do for your country.

  • We know how this works.

  • There is a reason why you remember that.

  • It's the same reason why certain songs are stuck in your head.

  • How many of you, over the last year,

  • have had Omi's "Cheerleader" song stuck in your head?

  • Dave, you said, "Cheerleader?"

  • What's the chorus of "Cheerleader?"

  • "Oh, I think that I found myself a cheerleader.

  • She is always right there when I need her."

  • Max Martin would say, that chorus has to be balanced,

  • the same number of words and the same number

  • of syllables on each one, on each side of the chorus.

  • In other words, we know how this stuff works.

  • I won't give you any more songs.

  • I don't want them stuck in your head all day

  • when you're at work.

  • You're going to find yourself singing that cheerleader

  • song today.

  • And if you start Autotuning yourself,

  • then you know you've completely lost it.

  • But we know how this works.

  • We know how it works in persuasion too.

  • Great songwriters know how it works.

  • And we know how it works when you're communicating ideas.

  • Adam Braun is the founder of a wonderful startup,

  • but a great nonprofit called Pencils of Promise.

  • Every 90 hours now, Pencils of Promise

  • builds a new classroom in impoverished or underprivileged

  • communities around the world.

  • And he told me something really interesting once.

  • Because he's always out there fund raising.

  • And he said, Carmine, it's interesting.

  • Because when I'm speaking to a group of financial types,

  • I'm trying to raise funds, they all

  • want to know about how efficiently the nonprofit is

  • run.

  • They want to know the data.

  • They want to know the finances.

  • But that's not what they remember.

  • They always seem to remember a two-minute sequence

  • from my presentation, where I show

  • a video of the first Pencils of Promise students.

  • Little girls that he met in Laos who

  • had never been in a classroom, had never

  • had a classroom before.

  • He shot a video a 30-second video on a smartphone, inserts

  • into his presentation.

  • He says, it's always a hit.

  • Here's the 30-second video he shows.

  • [VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • [SPEAKING THAI]

  • [END VIDEO PLAYBACK]

  • And that's it.

  • And then he shows this slide, which

  • is the same girls in their first Pencils of Promise school.

  • And he said, Carmine, facts and figures and data

  • never get me a standing ovation.

  • But this always does.

  • And this is what's memorable.

  • Why?

  • We know why this works.

  • Because we are wired for story.

  • Ideas that catch on are wrapped in story.

  • Stories inform.

  • They illuminate.

  • They inspire.

  • And it's not just me.

  • Because certainly, in business, most executive leaders

  • and successful business leaders believe the same thing.

  • That's the reason why I wrote the book.

  • It's because they kept telling me this.

  • Vinod Khosla, the billionaire investor,

  • said, "It's not enough to have facts on your side.

  • You have to do storytelling."

  • Ben Horowitz-- "Storytelling is the most underrated skill."

  • Let's go to "Shark Tank."

  • Barbara Corcoran-- "Storytelling is everything.

  • Show me an MBA and your sales numbers, that's fine.

  • But tell me a great story and we'll talk."

  • So here's the best part.

  • Storytelling is already in our DNA.

  • You already know how to do this.

  • We're all storytellers.

  • Storytelling around a campfire has been around 400,000 years.

  • It was a major development when people began to tell stories.

  • Firelight extended the day.

  • Anthropologists have been studying this.

  • When firelight extended the day, people started telling stories.

  • It ignited their imaginations.

  • It warned them of threats.

  • It was a major milestone in human development.

  • We've been doing this for centuries.

  • We know how to do it.

  • And people still do it today.

  • Richard Branson gathers his team around a campfire

  • at his home on Necker Island for the purpose of sharing stories.

  • Storytelling, he says, can be used to drive change.

  • In fact, about two weeks ago, Richard Branson

  • wrote a blog piece where he said,

  • if you want to be a successful entrepreneur,

  • you need to be able to tell stories well.

  • He said, you can have a great idea.

  • But if you can't communicate it well, it doesn't matter.

  • So we know how this works.

  • Today, for the next 20 minutes or so,

  • I want to give you three keys to winning the hearts

  • and minds of your audiences.

  • And that can be almost anything, whether you're

  • pitching a new idea, whether you're delivering

  • a presentation, what have you.

  • We're going to talk about the storyteller-- yourself--

  • the story that you deliver, and then

  • how you deliver that story.

  • So let's talk about the storyteller.

  • It's really important to see yourself

  • as the chief storytelling officer for your brand.

  • Great storytellers are not born.

  • They're made.

  • People work at it.

  • You cannot inspire other people until you're inspired yourself.

  • If you don't believe in your story, nobody else will.

  • And it's important, if you've faced adversity,

  • or if you've faced struggle in your life.

  • Or if you've had to overcome a business