Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So, I love making tools and sharing them with people.

    翻訳: Yasushi Aoki 校正: Yuko Yoshida

  • I remember as a child,

    私はツールを作って みんなに使ってもらうのが好きです

  • my first tool I built was actually a microscope

    私が子供のとき作った

  • that I built by stealing lenses from my brother's eyeglasses.

    最初のツールは顕微鏡で

  • He wasn't that thrilled.

    兄のメガネから盗んだ レンズで作りました

  • But, you know, maybe because of that moment,

    あんまり感心されません でしたけど

  • 30 years later,

    そのせいかもしれません

  • I'm still making microscopes.

    30年たった今も

  • And the reason I built these tools is for moments like this.

    私は顕微鏡を作っています

  • (Video) Girl: I have black things in my hair --

    私がそういったツールを作っているのは こんな瞬間のためです

  • Manu Prakash: This is a school in the Bay Area.

    (女の子) 私の髪に黒いのがたくさんある

  • (Video) MP: The living world far supersedes our imagination

    (講演者) ベイエリアの学校です

  • of how things actually work.

    (ビデオの声) 生きた世界は

  • (Video) Boy: Oh my God!

    私たちが想像するもののしくみを 遙かに超えています

  • MP: Right -- oh my God!

    (子供) オー・マイ・ゴッド!

  • I hadn't realized this would be such a universal phrase.

    (講演者) そう 「オー・マイ・ゴッド」です

  • Over the last two years,

    これがそんなに普遍的な言葉だとは 思っていませんでした

  • in my lab,

    この2年間で

  • we built 50,000 Foldscopes

    私たちの研究室では

  • and shipped them to 130 countries in the world,

    フォールドスコープ(Foldscope)を 5万個作り

  • at no cost to the kids we sent them to.

    世界130カ国の子供達に

  • This year alone,

    無料で届けてきました

  • with the support of our community,

    今年は

  • we are planning to ship a million microscopes

    コミュニティの サポートのお陰で

  • to kids around the world.

    百万個の顕微鏡を

  • What does that do?

    世界中の子供達に 送ろうとしています

  • It creates an inspiring community of people around the world,

    そうすると 何が起きるのか?

  • learning and teaching each other,

    世界中から人々が参加する 刺激的なコミュニティが生まれ

  • from Kenya to Kampala to Kathmandu to Kansas.

    互いに学び合い 教え合うのです

  • And one of the phenomenal things that I love about this

    ケニアから カンパラ カトマンズ カンザスまで

  • is the sense of community.

    これについて気に入っている すごいところは

  • There's a kid in Nicaragua

    共同体意識です

  • teaching others how to identify mosquito species that carry dengue

    ニカラグアの子供が 他の子達に

  • by looking at the larva under a microscope.

    蚊の幼虫を顕微鏡で見て

  • There's a pharmacologist who came up with a new way

    デング熱を媒介する種類か 判断する方法を教えています

  • to detect fake drugs anywhere.

    薬理学の専門家が

  • There is a girl who wondered:

    顕微鏡で偽薬を見分ける 新しい方法を考え出しました

  • "How does glitter actually work?"

    ものがキラキラするのは どういう仕組みなのか

  • and discovered the physics of crystalline formation in glitter.

    疑問に思った女の子が

  • There is an Argentinian doctor

    燦めきの中に 結晶構造の 物理の世界を発見しています

  • who's trying to do field cervical cancer screening with this tool.

    アルゼンチンの お医者さんは

  • And yours very truly found a species of flea

    この顕微鏡を使って出先で 子宮頸癌の検査をやろうとしています

  • that was dug inside my heel in my foot one centimeter deep.

    そして私自身も

  • Now, you might think of these as anomalies.

    踵に1センチも潜り込んでいた 蚤の一種を見つけました

  • But there is a method to this madness.

    そういうのは例外的なことだと 思うかもしれません

  • I call this "frugal science" --

    でも そういうすごいことを 引き起こせる方法があるんです

  • the idea of sharing the experience of science,

    私はこれを「質素な科学」と 呼んでいます

  • and not just the information.

    情報だけでなく

  • To remind you:

    科学する体験を 共有しようというアイデアです

  • there are a billion people on this planet

    考えてください

  • who live with absolutely no infrastructure:

    まったくインフラのないところに 暮らしている人が

  • no roads,

    世界には10億人いるんです

  • no electricity

    道路もなく

  • and thus, no health care.

    電気もなく

  • Also, there a billion kids on this planet that live in poverty.

    医療もありません

  • How are we supposed to inspire them

    また 貧困状態にある子供が 世界には10億人います

  • for the next generation of solution makers?

    そういう人たちが次世代の 問題解決者へと育つためには

  • There are health care workers that we put on the line

    何をすればいいのでしょう?

  • to fight infectious diseases,

    最前線で 我々を守るために

  • to protect us with absolutely bare-minimum tools and resources.

    まったく最低限の ツールとリソースだけで

  • So as a lab at Stanford,

    感染症と戦っている 医療従事者がいます

  • I think of this from a context of frugal science

    スタンフォードの研究室として 私たちがものを考える文脈は

  • and building solutions for these communities.

    質素な科学を使い

  • Often we think about being able to do diagnosis under a tree, off-grid.

    そういうコミュニティのための 解を見つけるということです

  • I'll tell you two examples today of new tools.

    電気もない木の下で診断ができる 方法を考えたりします

  • One of them starts in Uganda.

    今日は新しいツールの例を 2つご紹介します

  • In 2013,

    その1つの発端は ウガンダでした

  • on a field trip to detect schistosomiasis with Foldscopes,

    2013年のこと

  • I made a minor observation.

    フォールドスコープで住血吸虫症を 検出しようという調査旅行をしていて

  • In a clinic,

    気付いたことがありました

  • in a far, remote area,

    あるすごく 僻地の診療所で

  • I saw a centrifuge being used as a doorstop.

    遠心分離器が

  • I mean -- quite literally, the doorstop.

    ドアストッパーとして 使われていたんです

  • And I asked them and they said,

    文字通りのドアストッパーです

  • "Oh, we don't actually have electricity,

    どうしてか聞いてみたら

  • so this piece of junk is good as a doorstop."

    「ここは電気が来てないから 使い物にならないけど

  • Centrifuges, for some of you who don't know,

    ドアストッパーにちょうど良かったから」 とのことでした

  • are the pinnacle tool to be able to do sample processing.

    遠心分離器が何か知らない人も いるかと思いますが

  • You separate components of blood or body fluids

    これは試料の処理には 欠かせない道具です

  • to be able to detect and identify pathogens.

    血液や体液を 成分へと分離して

  • But centrifuges are bulky, expensive --

    病原体を見つけて 特定できるようにします

  • cost around 1,000 dollars --

    しかし遠心分離器は 大きく高価で—

  • and really hard to carry out in the field.

    千ドルくらいします—

  • And of course,

    そして野外に持ち出すのも 困難です

  • they don't work without power.

    もちろん

  • Sound familiar?

    電気がないと動きません

  • So we started thinking about solving this problem,

    聞いたことの あるような話ですね

  • and I came back --

    それで この問題を 解決できないか考え始め

  • kept thinking about toys.

    戻ってからずっと

  • Now ...

    ある種のおもちゃのことを 考えていました

  • I have a few with me here.

    ここに—

  • I first started with yo-yos ...

    いくつか持ってきましたが

  • and I'm a terrible yo-yo thrower.

    まずヨーヨーから始めました

  • Because these objects spin,

    私はすごくヘタなんですが

  • we wondered,

    これは回転するように なっているので

  • could we actually use the physics of these objects

    思ったわけです

  • to be able to build centrifuges?

    その物理的特性を利用して

  • This was possibly the worst throw I could make.

    遠心分離器を作れないかと

  • But you might start realizing,

    我ながら下手くそですね

  • if you start exploring the space of toys --

    オモチャの世界を 探索していると

  • we tried these spinning tops,

    見えてきます

  • and then in the lab,

    コマやなんかを 試してみましたが

  • we stumbled upon this wonder.

    それから この素晴らしいものに

  • It's the whirligig, or a buzzer, or a rundle.

    行き当たりました

  • A couple of strings and a little disk,

    ワーリギグ とか バザーとか ランドルなどと呼ばれています

  • and if I push, it spins.

    円盤に2本の紐が付いていて

  • How many of you have played with this as a kid?

    引っ張ると回転します

  • This is called a button-on-a-string.

    子供の頃 これで 遊んだことのある人?

  • OK, maybe 50 percent of you.

    「ぶんぶんゴマ」 とも呼ばれています

  • What you didn't realize --

    半数くらいは 遊んだことがありそうですね

  • that this little object

    ご存じないと思いますが

  • is the oldest toy in the history of mankind ...

    この小さな物は

  • 5,000 years ago.

    人類史上最も古い オモチャなんです

  • We have found relics of this object hidden around on our planet.

    5千年も前からあって

  • Now the irony is,

    世界の様々なところで 出土しています

  • we actually don't understand how this little thing works.

    皮肉なのは

  • That's when I get excited.

    どういう仕組みなのか 知られていなかったということです

  • So we got back to work,

    すごくワクワクしましたね

  • wrote down a couple of equations.

    それで研究に取りかかって

  • If you take the input torque that you put in,

    方程式をいくつか書きました

  • you take the drag on this disc,

    投入するトルク

  • and the twist drag on these strings,

    円盤の抵抗

  • you should be able to mathematically solve this.

    紐のねじれの抵抗を元に

  • This is not the only equation in my talk.

    数学的に解くことが できるはずです

  • Ten pages of math later,

    この講演で出てくる方程式は これで全部ではありません

  • we could actually write down the complete analytical solution

    10ページに及ぶ数式の後

  • for this dynamic system.

    これの力学系の 完全な分析解を

  • And out comes what we call "Paperfuge."

    書き出すことができました

  • That's my postdoc Saad Bhamla,

    そして そこから得られたのが ペーパーフュージ (Paperfuge)です

  • who's the co-inventor of Paperfuge.

    彼はうちのポスドクの サード・バームラで

  • And to the left, you see all the centrifuges

    ペーパーフュージの 共同発明者です

  • that we're trying to replace.

    左に写っているのが

  • This little object that you see right here

    これで代用しようとしている 遠心分離器です

  • is a disc, a couple of strings and a handle.

    これは ご覧のように—

  • And when I spin

    円盤と 2本の紐と 取っ手からできています

  • and I push,

    回すときには

  • it starts to spin.

    こう引っ張ってやると

  • Now, when you realize,

    回り始めます

  • when you do the math,

    計算してみて

  • when we calculate the rpm for this object,

    分かったのは

  • mathematically, we should be able to go all the way to a million rpm.

    これの回転速度は

  • Now, there is a little twist in human anatomy,

    理論的には 百万回転/分まで いけるはずということです

  • because the resonant frequency of this object is about 10 hertz,

    ただ人体の解剖学的限界があって

  • and if you've ever played the piano,

    これの振動数は 10ヘルツくらいなのに対し

  • you can't go higher than two or three hertz.

    ピアノをやっていた人は ご存じでしょうが

  • The maximum speed we've been able to achieve with this object

    人間は2〜3ヘルツより 速くは動けません

  • is not 10,000 rpm,

    これを使って達成できた 最大回転速度は

  • not 50,000 rpm --

    1万回転/分でも

  • 120,000 rpm.

    5万回転/分でもなく

  • That's equal to 30,000 g-forces.

    12万回転/分です

  • If I was to stick you right here and have it spin,

    遠心力は3万Gにもなります

  • you would think about the types of forces you would experience.

    皆さんをこれに貼り付けて 回転させたら

  • One of the factors of a tool like this

    どれほどの力を体験することになるか 想像してみてください

  • is to be able to do diagnosis with this.

    このツールのポイントは

  • So, I'm going to do a quick demo here, where --

    診断に使えるということです

  • this is a moment where I'm going to make a little finger prick,

    ここで手早くデモをして ご覧に入れましょう

  • and a tiny drop of blood is going to come out.

    今から指をチクッと刺して

  • If you don't like blood, you don't have to look at it.

    血を一滴採りますので

  • Here is a little lancet.

    血を見るのが嫌いな人は 見なくていいです

  • These lancets are available everywhere,

    これは小さな穿刺器で

  • completely passive.

    どこでも手に入り

  • And if I've had breakfast today ...

    まったく安全です

  • That didn't hurt at all.

    今日朝食を取っていれば—

  • OK, I take a little capillary with a drop of blood --

    これは全然痛くありません

  • now this drop of blood has answers,

    血を細い管に入れます

  • that's why I'm interested in it.

    この血が答えを教えてくれます

  • It might actually tell me whether I have malaria right now or not.

    それが興味深いところで

  • I take a little capillary,

    私の体内にマラリアがいるかどうかも 教えてくれます

  • and you see it starts wicking in.

    細管を見ると

  • I'm going to draw a little more blood.

    血が入っていくのが分かります

  • And that's good enough for right now.

    もう少し血を出しましょう

  • Now, I just seal this capillary by putting it in clay.

    これだけあれば十分です

  • And now that's sealed the sample.

    細管を粘土の中に入れて 密封します

  • We're going to take the sample,

    血のサンプルが 密封されました

  • mount it on Paperfuge.

    このサンプルを

  • A little piece of tape to make a sealed cavity.

    ペーパーフュージに 取り付けます

  • So now the sample is completely enclosed.

    小さなテープで 密閉された空洞を作ります

  • And we are ready for a spin.

    これでサンプルが 封入されました

  • I'm pushing and pulling with this object.

    回転にかける 準備が整いました

  • I'm going to load this up ...

    引いたり緩めたりします

  • And you see the object starts spinning.

    勢いを付けましょう

  • Unlike a regular centrifuge,

    回転し始めたのが 分かりますね

  • this is a counter-rotating centrifuge.

    普通の遠心分離器とは違い

  • It goes back and forth, back and forth ...

    この遠心分離器は 回転方向が交互に変わります

  • And now I'm charging it up,

    回転と逆回転を繰り返します

  • and you see it builds momentum.

    もっと速くしましょう

  • And now -- I don't know if you can hear this --

    勢いがついているのが 分かります

  • 30 seconds of this,

    皆さんに この音が 聞こえるか分かりませんが

  • and I should be able to separate all the blood cells with the plasma.

    30秒こうしていると

  • And the ratio of those blood cells to plasma --

    血球と血漿に 分離できます

  • (Applause)

    そして血漿に対する 血球の比によって—

  • Already, if you see right here,

    (拍手)

  • if you focus on this,

    もう分離されています

  • you should be able to see a separated volume

    ここの部分を見てもらうと

  • of blood and plasma.

    血球と血漿に

  • And the ratio of that actually tells me whether I might be anemic.

    分かれています

  • One of the aspects of this is, we build many types of Paperfuges.

    この比によって 私が貧血かどうか分かります

  • This one allows us to identify malaria parasites

    私たちは いろんな種類の ペーパーフュージを作りました

  • by running them for a little longer,

    これはもう少し長く回すことで

  • and we can identify malaria parasites that are in the blood

    マラリアが寄生しているか 特定します

  • that we can separate out and detect with something like a centrifuge.

    血液中のマラリアを 遠心分離器で分離することで

  • Another version of this allows me to separate nucleic acids

    見つけられるようになります

  • to be able to do nucleic acid tests out in the field itself.

    別のバージョンは 核酸を分離して

  • Here is another version that allows me to separate bulk samples,

    野外で核酸の検査を できるようにします

  • and then, finally,

    これはまた別のバージョンで 複数のサンプルをまとめて処理できます

  • something new that we've been working on

    最後に これが

  • to be able to implement the entire multiplex test on an object like this.

    今取り組んでいる 新しいもので

  • So where you do the sample preparation and the chemistry in the same object.

    いくつものテストを 1回でやることができます

  • Now ...

    試料の準備と化学分析を 同じ円盤でできます

  • this is all good,

    さて

  • but when you start thinking about this,

    それはいいんですが

  • you have to share these tools with people.

    折角のツールですから

  • And one of the things we did is -- we just got back from Madagascar;

    みんなに使ってもらわないと いけません

  • this is what clinical trials for malaria look like --

    私たちはマダガスカルから 戻ってきたところですが

  • (Laughter)

    これはマラリアの 臨床試験の様子です

  • You can do this while having coffee.

    (笑)

  • But most importantly,

    コーヒーを飲みながらでもできます

  • this is a village six hours from any road.

    大事なのは—

  • We are in a room with one of the senior members of the community

    ここは主要道路から6時間 隔たっている村です

  • and a health care worker.

    部屋に村の長老と

  • It really is this portion of the work that excites me the most --

    医療従事者がいます

  • that smile,

    これが私の仕事の中で 最も胸が高まる部分です

  • to be able to share simple but powerful tools with people around the world.

    この笑顔

  • Now, I forgot to tell you this,

    シンプルだけど強力なツールを 世界中の人々に分け与えられるということです

  • that all of that cost me 20 cents to make.

    言い忘れていましたが

  • OK, in the negative time I have left,

    これを作るコストは 20セントです

  • I'll tell you about the most recent --

    あと残りの 負の時間を使って

  • (Laughter)

    最近の発明について—

  • invention from our lab.

    (笑)

  • It's called Abuzz --

    ご紹介します

  • the idea that all of you could help us fight mosquitoes;

    Abuzz という名前です

  • you could all help us track our enemies.

    蚊と戦うために みんなに協力してもらい

  • These are enemies because they cause malaria, Zika, chikungunya, dengue.

    敵の追跡をしようというのが アイデアです

  • But the challenge is that we actually don't know where our enemies are.

    蚊が敵なのは マラリア ジカ熱 チクングンヤ熱 デング熱の元だからです

  • The world map for where mosquitoes are is missing.

    難しいのは 敵がどこにいるのか 分かっていないことです

  • So we started thinking about this.

    蚊がどこにいるか示す 世界地図がありません

  • There are 3,500 species of mosquitoes,

    それで考え始めました

  • and they're all very similar.

    蚊は3,500種いますが

  • Some of them are so identical

    みんな似通っています

  • that even an entomologist cannot identify them under a microscope.

    すごく似ているため