Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • (Sikh Prayer) Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa,

    シーク教の祈り)Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa.

  • Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.

    Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh.

  • There is a moment on the birthing table

    分娩台の上に瞬間がある

  • that feels like dying.

    死にたい気分になる

  • The body in labor stretches to form an impossible circle.

    陣痛中の身体が伸びて不可能な円を形成する。

  • The contractions are less than a minute apart.

    陣痛は1分以内の間隔です。

  • Wave after wave, there is barely time to breathe.

    次から次へと波が押し寄せてきて、息をする時間がほとんどない。

  • The medical term:

    医学用語。

  • "transition,"

    "遷移

  • because "feels like dying" is not scientific enough.

    なぜなら、「死ぬ気がする」というのは科学的には不十分だからです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I checked.

    確認しました。

  • During my transition,

    私の移行期に

  • my husband was pressing down on my sacrum

    夫が私の仙骨を圧迫していた

  • to keep my body from breaking.

    体が壊れないように

  • My father was waiting behind the hospital curtain ...

    父は病院のカーテンの向こうで待っていた・・・。

  • more like hiding.

    隠れているようなものだ

  • But my mother was at my side.

    しかし、母は私の側にいました。

  • The midwife said she could see the baby's head,

    助産師さんは、赤ちゃんの頭が見えると言っていました。

  • but all I could feel was a ring of fire.

    でも私には火の輪しか感じられませんでした。

  • I turned to my mother and said, "I can't,"

    母の方を向いて、「できない」と言いました。

  • but she was already pouring my grandfather's prayer in my ear.

    しかし、彼女はすでに私の耳に祖父の祈りを注いでいました。

  • (Sikh Prayer) "Tati Vao Na Lagi, Par Brahm Sarnai."

    "Tati Vao Na Lagi, Par Brahm Sarnai"

  • "The hot winds cannot touch you."

    "熱風はあなたに触れられない"

  • "You are brave," she said.

    "あなたは勇気がある "と言っていました。

  • "You are brave."

    "君は勇敢だ"

  • And suddenly I saw my grandmother standing behind my mother.

    すると突然、母の後ろに祖母が立っているのが見えました。

  • And her mother behind her.

    そして、その後ろにいる母親。

  • And her mother behind her.

    そして、その後ろにいる母親。

  • A long line of women who had pushed through the fire before me.

    目の前の火事を押し切った女性たちの長蛇の列。

  • I took a breath;

    私は一息ついた。

  • I pushed;

    私は押しました。

  • my son was born.

    息子が生まれました。

  • As I held him in my arms, shaking and sobbing

    震えて泣きながら彼を抱きしめたとき

  • from the rush of oxytocin that flooded my body,

    オキシトシンが体中に溢れたからだ

  • my mother was already preparing to feed me.

    母はすでに食事の準備をしていました。

  • Nursing her baby as I nursed mine.

    私の赤ちゃんを授乳しながら

  • My mother had never stopped laboring for me,

    母は私のために陣痛を止めたことはありませんでした。

  • from my birth to my son's birth.

    私の誕生から息子の誕生まで。

  • She already knew what I was just beginning to name.

    彼女はすでに私が名前を挙げ始めたばかりのことを知っていた。

  • That love is more than a rush of feeling

    その恋は気持ちの高ぶりよりも

  • that happens to us if we're lucky.

    運が良ければ、そうなることもある。

  • Love is sweet labor.

    愛は甘い労働です。

  • Fierce.

    獰猛だ

  • Bloody.

    血まみれだ

  • Imperfect.

    不完全だ

  • Life-giving.

    命を与えること。

  • A choice we make over and over again.

    何度も何度も繰り返す選択。

  • I am an American civil rights activist

    私はアメリカの公民権運動家です

  • who has labored with communities of color since September 11,

    9月11日以降、有色人種のコミュニティと一緒に働いてきた人たち。

  • fighting unjust policies by the state and acts of hate in the street.

    国家による不当な政策と街頭での憎悪行為との戦い

  • And in our most painful moments,

    そして、私たちの最も苦しい瞬間に

  • in the face of the fires of injustice,

    不正の火種に直面して

  • I have seen labors of love deliver us.

    私は愛の労働を見てきました。

  • My life on the frontlines of fighting hate in America has been a study

    アメリカで憎しみと戦う最前線での私の人生は勉強になりました。

  • in what I've come to call revolutionary love.

    私が革命的な愛と呼ぶようになったのは

  • Revolutionary love is the choice to enter into labor

    革命的な愛は労働に入る選択である

  • for others who do not look like us,

    私たちとは似ても似つかない他人のために

  • for our opponents who hurt us

    痛い目に遭わせた相手のために

  • and for ourselves.

    と自分たちのために。

  • In this era of enormous rage,

    猛威を振るうこの時代に

  • when the fires are burning all around us,

    私たちの周りで火が燃えているとき。

  • I believe that revolutionary love is the call of our times.

    革命的な愛こそが今の時代の呼び声だと思っています。

  • Now, if you cringe when people say, "Love is the answer ..."

    今、人々が言うとき、あなたは "愛が答えである... "と言っているならば...

  • I do, too.

    私もそうです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I am a lawyer.

    私は弁護士です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So let me show you how I came to see love as a force for social justice

    私が愛を社会正義の力として捉えるようになった経緯をお見せしましょう。

  • through three lessons.

    3つのレッスンを通して

  • My first encounter with hate was in the schoolyard.

    憎しみとの最初の出会いは校庭でした。

  • I was a little girl growing up in California,

    私はカリフォルニアで育った小さな女の子でした。

  • where my family has lived and farmed for a century.

    私の家族が100年前から住んでいて、農業をしてきた場所です。

  • When I was told that I would go to hell because I was not Christian,

    キリスト教徒ではないから地獄に行くと言われた時。

  • called a "black dog" because I was not white,

    白人ではないので「黒い犬」と呼ばれていました。

  • I ran to my grandfather's arms.

    祖父の腕に駆け寄った。

  • Papa Ji dried my tears --

    パパ・ジは私の涙を乾かした

  • gave me the words of Guru Nanak,

    グル・ナナークの言葉を私にくれました。

  • the founder of the Sikh faith.

    シーク教の創始者。

  • "I see no stranger," said Nanak.

    "見知らぬ人はいない "と ナナクは言った

  • "I see no enemy."

    "敵はいない"

  • My grandfather taught me

    祖父が教えてくれた

  • that I could choose to see all the faces I meet

    出会うすべての顔を見ることができるように

  • and wonder about them.

    と疑問に思うことがあります。

  • And if I wonder about them,

    そして、彼らのことを気にしていたら

  • then I will listen to their stories even when it's hard.

    辛くても話を聞いてあげようと思います。

  • I will refuse to hate them even when they hate me.

    嫌われても断固拒否します。

  • I will even vow to protect them when they are in harm's way.

    彼らが危険な目に遭った時には、私は彼らを守ることさえ誓うだろう。

  • That's what it means to be a Sikh:

    それがシーク教徒であることの意味です。

  • S-i-k-h.

    S-i-k-h

  • To walk the path of a warrior saint.

    武士の聖人の道を歩むために。

  • He told me the story of the first Sikh woman warrior,

    初代シーク族の女性戦士の話をしてくれました。

  • Mai Bhago.

    マイバゴ。

  • The story goes there were 40 soldiers who abandoned their post

    40人の兵隊が赴任先を放棄していたという。

  • during a great battle against an empire.

    帝国との戦いの中で

  • They returned to a village,

    二人は村に戻った。

  • and this village woman turned to them and said,

    と、この村の女性が彼らに向き直って言った。

  • "You will not abandon the fight.

    "戦いを放棄しない

  • You will return to the fire,

    火事場に戻ることになります。

  • and I will lead you."

    "私があなたを導く"

  • She mounted a horse.

    彼女は馬に乗った

  • She donned a turban.

    彼女はターバンを着ていた。

  • And with sword in her hand and fire in her eyes,

    手には剣を持ち、目には炎を宿している。

  • she led them where no one else would.

    彼女は他の誰もしないところに 彼らを導いた

  • She became the one she was waiting for.

    彼女は待っていた人になった

  • "Don't abandon your posts, my dear."

    "投稿を放棄しないでね"

  • My grandfather saw me as a warrior.

    祖父は私を戦士として見ていました。

  • I was a little girl in two long braids,

    長めの三つ編みを2本にした小さな女の子でした。

  • but I promised.

    しかし、私は約束した。

  • Fast-forward, I'm 20 years old,

    早送りして、私は20歳。

  • watching the Twin Towers fall,

    ツインタワーが倒れるのを見て

  • the horror stuck in my throat,

    恐怖が喉に突き刺さった。

  • and then a face flashes on the screen:

    と、画面に顔が点滅します。

  • a brown man with a turban and beard,

    ターバンと髭を生やした茶色い男。

  • and I realize that our nation's new enemy looks like my grandfather.

    我が国の新たな敵が祖父に似ていることを実感しています。

  • And these turbans meant to represent our commitment to serve

    そして、これらのターバンは、私たちの奉仕へのコミットメントを表していることを意味します。

  • cast us as terrorists.

    私たちをテロリストに仕立て上げた

  • And Sikhs became targets of hate,

    そして、シーク教徒は憎しみの対象になった。

  • alongside our Muslim brothers and sisters.

    イスラム教徒の兄弟姉妹と共に

  • The first person killed in a hate crime after September 11 was a Sikh man,

    9月11日以降、憎悪犯罪で最初に殺されたのはシーク教徒の男性だった。

  • standing in front of his gas station in Arizona.

    アリゾナのガソリンスタンドの前に立っていた。

  • Balbir Singh Sodhi was a family friend I called "uncle,"

    バルビル・シン・ソーディは、私が「おじさん」と呼んでいた家族の友人だった。

  • murdered by a man who called himself "patriot."

    "愛国者 "と名乗る男に殺された

  • He is the first of many to have been killed,

    彼は、多くの人の中で一番最初に殺された人です。

  • but his story --

    でも彼の話は...

  • our stories barely made the evening news.

    夕方のニュースでは ほとんど報道されなかった

  • I didn't know what to do,

    どうしたらいいのかわからなかった。

  • but I had a camera,

    が、カメラを持っていました。

  • I faced the fire.

    私は火と向き合った。

  • I went to his widow,

    彼の未亡人のところに行ってきました。

  • Joginder Kaur.

    ジョギンダー・カー

  • I wept with her, and I asked her,

    と泣きながら聞いてみました。

  • "What would you like to tell the people of America?"

    "アメリカの人々に何を伝えたい?"

  • I was expecting blame.

    非難されることを期待していました。

  • But she looked at me and said,

    しかし、彼女は私を見て言った。

  • "Tell them, 'Thank you.'

    "ありがとうございました "と伝えてください。

  • 3,000 Americans came to my husband's memorial.

    3000人のアメリカ人が夫の追悼に来てくれました。

  • They did not know me,

    彼らは私を知らなかった

  • but they wept with me.

    しかし、彼らは私と一緒に泣いていました。

  • Tell them, 'Thank you.'"

    ありがとうございますと伝えてください。

  • Thousands of people showed up,

    何千人もの人が現れた。

  • because unlike national news,

    なぜなら、全国ニュースと違って

  • the local media told Balbir Uncle's story.

    地元メディアはBalbirおじさんの話をしました。

  • Stories can create the wonder

    物語は不思議を生み出す

  • that turns strangers into sisters and brothers.

    見ず知らずの人を姉妹や兄弟に変えてしまう

  • This was my first lesson in revolutionary love --

    革命的な愛の初レッスンでした--。

  • that stories can help us see no stranger.

    物語は、私たちが見知らぬ人を見ないようにするのに役立つということです。

  • And so ...

    それで...

  • my camera became my sword.

    私のカメラが私の剣になった

  • My law degree became my shield.

    法学部が盾になった

  • My film partner became my husband.

    映画の相棒が夫になった。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I didn't expect that.

    それは予想外でした。

  • And we became part of a generation of advocates

    そして、私たちは擁護者の世代の一員になりました。

  • working with communities facing their own fires.

    は、それぞれの火災に直面している地域社会と協力しています。

  • I worked inside of supermax prisons,

    私はスーパーマックス刑務所で働いていました。

  • on the shores of Guantanamo,

    グアンタナモの海岸で

  • at the sites of mass shootings

    銃乱射現場

  • when the blood was still fresh on the ground.

    血が地面についたままの状態で

  • And every time,

    そして毎回

  • for 15 years,

    15年間

  • with every film, with every lawsuit,

    すべての映画で、すべての訴訟で

  • with every campaign,

    キャンペーンのたびに

  • I thought we were making the nation safer

    私たちは国家をより安全にしていると思っていた

  • for the next generation.

    次世代のために。

  • And then my son was born.

    そして、息子が生まれました。

  • In a time ...

    時代の流れの中で

  • when hate crimes against our communities

    私たちの地域社会に対する憎悪犯罪が発生したとき

  • are at the highest they have been since 9/11.

    9.11以来の高値を記録しています。

  • When right-wing nationalist movements are on the rise around the globe

    右翼の民族主義運動が世界的に盛り上がっている時に

  • and have captured the presidency of the United States.

    と米国の大統領職を掌握している。

  • When white supremacists march in our streets,

    白人至上主義者が街頭でデモ行進すると

  • torches high, hoods off.

    松明は高く、フードは外しています。

  • And I have to reckon with the fact

    そして、私は事実を見極める必要があります。

  • that my son is growing up in a country more dangerous for him

    私の息子が危険な国で育っていることを

  • than the one I was given.

    私が与えられたものよりも

  • And there will be moments

    瞬間があるだろう

  • when I cannot protect him

    守ってあげられない時

  • when he is seen as a terrorist ...

    テロリストと見られると

  • just as black people in America

    アメリカの黒人と同じように

  • are still seen as criminal.

    は今でも犯罪者として見られています。

  • Brown people, illegal.

    褐色の人は違法だ

  • Queer and trans people, immoral.

    クィアやトランスの人は不道徳だ

  • Indigenous people, savage.

    先住民族、野蛮人。

  • Women and girls as property.

    財産としての女性と少女。

  • And when they fail to see our bodies as some mother's child,

    彼らが私たちの体を母親の子供として見ていない時に

  • it becomes easier to ban us,

    私たちを追放するのが簡単になります。

  • detain us,

    私たちを拘束します。

  • deport us,

    私たちを強制送還してください。

  • imprison us,

    私たちを投獄します。

  • sacrifice us for the illusion of security.

    安全という幻想のために私たちを犠牲にして

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • I wanted to abandon my post.

    自分の投稿を放棄したいと思いました。

  • But I made a promise,

    でも、約束したんです。

  • so I returned to the gas station

    ということで、ガソリンスタンドに戻りました。

  • where Balbir Singh Sodhi was killed 15 years to the day.

    バルビル・シン・ソディが15年前に殺された場所です。

  • I set down a candle in the spot where he bled to death.

    彼が血を流して死んだ場所にロウソクを置いた。

  • His brother, Rana, turned to me

    弟のラナは私の方を向いた

  • and said, "Nothing has changed."

    と言って、"何も変わっていない "と言っていました。

  • And I asked,

    と聞いてみました。

  • "Who have we not yet tried to love?"

    "誰を愛そうとしなかったのか?"

  • We decided to call the murderer in prison.

    殺人犯を刑務所に呼ぶことにしました。

  • The phone rings.

    電話が鳴る。

  • My heart is beating in my ears.

    耳元で心臓がドキドキしています。

  • I hear the voice of Frank Roque,

    フランク・ロケの声が聞こえてくる。

  • a man who once said ...

    と言っていた人

  • "I'm going to go out and shoot some towel heads.

    "タオルヘッド "を撃ちに行ってきます。

  • We should kill their children, too."

    彼らの子供たちも殺すべきだ"

  • And every emotional impulse in me says, "I can't."

    感情的な衝動で "できない "と言っています

  • It becomes an act of will to wonder.

    不思議に思うのは意志の行為になります。

  • "Why?" I ask.

    "なぜ?"私は尋ねる

  • "Why did you agree to speak with us?"

    "なぜ我々と話すことに同意したのか?"

  • Frank says, "I'm sorry for what happened,

    フランクは、「何があったかというと、ごめんなさい。

  • but I'm also sorry for all the people killed on 9/11."

    でも9.11で殺された人たちのことも気の毒に思う"

  • He fails to take responsibility.

    彼は責任を取ることに失敗した。

  • I become angry to protect Rana,

    ラナを守ろうと腹が立つようになる。

  • but Rana is still wondering about Frank --

    でもラナはまだフランクのことが気になって仕方がないようだ -- {fnx.

  • listening --

    傍聴

  • responds.

    と答える。

  • "Frank, this is the first time I'm hearing you say

    "フランク、あなたの言葉を聞くのは初めてだわ

  • that you feel sorry."

    "申し訳ないと思っている"

  • And Frank --

    フランクは...

  • Frank says, "Yes.

    フランクは「はい。

  • I am sorry for what I did to your brother.

    お兄さんには申し訳ないことをしてしまいました。

  • One day when I go to heaven to be judged by God,

    いつか天国に行って神の裁きを受ける日が来る。

  • I will ask to see your brother.

    お兄さんに会いに行こうと思います。

  • And I will hug him.

    と抱きしめてあげます。

  • And I will ask him for forgiveness."

    "許しを請う"

  • And Rana says ...

    ラナが言うには

  • "We already forgave you."

    "私たちはもうあなたを許した"

  • Forgiveness is not forgetting.

    許すことは忘れることではありません。

  • Forgiveness is freedom from hate.

    赦しとは憎しみからの自由です。

  • Because when we are free from hate,

    憎しみから解放されたら

  • we see the ones who hurt us not as monsters,

    私たちは、私たちを傷つけるものを怪物としてではなく、見ています。

  • but as people who themselves are wounded,

    が、自分自身が傷ついている人として

  • who themselves feel threatened,

    自分自身が脅威を感じている人

  • who don't know what else to do with their insecurity

    腑甲斐のない人

  • but to hurt us, to pull the trigger,

    でも、私たちを傷つけ、引き金を引くために。

  • or cast the vote,

    または投票してください。

  • or pass the policy aimed at us.

    または私たちに向けられた政策を通過させる。

  • But if some of us begin to wonder about them,

    しかし、何人かの人が疑問を持ち始めると

  • listen even to their stories,

    彼らの話を聞いても