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  • (electronic music)

  • - Hello, everyone!

  • And welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • I have been testing out

  • the new poll function on Instagram.

  • If you don't already follow me

  • it's @LearnEnglishWithLucy.

  • Somebody already took EnglishWithLucy

  • so I had to add learn, I'm sorry.

  • So yes, on my Instagram Stories

  • I've been asking you guys

  • what you want to see in my videos.

  • I'm going to be talking to you

  • about some really lovely expressions and idioms.

  • And I've decided that I'm going to talk about

  • expressions and idioms that relate to animals.

  • Because in a lot of our daily conversation,

  • we mention animals

  • but we don't always intend to talk about animals.

  • So let's talk about that today.

  • Quickly, before we get started,

  • I'd just like to thank the sponsor of today's video,

  • it is Lingoda.

  • You guys should already know this.

  • Lingoda is an online language academy.

  • You can learn English, Spanish, German, and French.

  • And you have real face-to-face video lessons

  • both with private tutors and with groups as well.

  • You sign up on a monthly subscription package basis.

  • And they've given me a very special offer for you.

  • You can get 50 Euros or $50 off your first month at Lingoda.

  • All you have to do is click on the link

  • in the description box

  • and use the code LUCY2.

  • Right, let's get started with the lesson.

  • Now the first one,

  • what am I talking about

  • if I talk about the birds and the bees?

  • So I might say something like,

  • "I learned about the birds and the bees

  • "from my friends at school."

  • Or "My mom refused to teach me

  • "about the birds and the bees."

  • What could it possibly mean?

  • It means sex education or sometimes just sex.

  • If I ask you, "Where did you learn

  • "about the birds and the bees?"

  • I'm asking you, "Where did you learn

  • "about how babies are made?", for example.

  • It's an important one to know

  • to avoid any awkward situations.

  • I don't want somebody to ask you

  • about the birds and the bees

  • and for you to start talking about honey and parrots.

  • (laughing)

  • The next one is to have ants in one's pants.

  • I wonder if this one translates into your language.

  • Comment below if this one is the same in your language.

  • But if you have ants in your pants,

  • it means that you are full of nervous energy,

  • you can't stop moving,

  • you're maybe a little bit hyperactive.

  • So sometimes in the morning

  • I really want to go on my run

  • and I have ants in my pants.

  • I can't stop moving until I go on my run

  • and burn all my energy.

  • Now the next one is a phrasal verb

  • and it is to chicken out.

  • To chicken out.

  • I'm going to use it in a sentence for you.

  • I was going to jump off the cliff but I chickened out.

  • It's inseparable.

  • You can't separate it.

  • It means, to decide not to do something

  • because you are scared.

  • It's to avoid doing something because you are scared.

  • So I was going to jump off the cliff

  • but then I felt afraid so I didn't.

  • I chickened out.

  • The next one, I've got another phrasal verb for you

  • and this is to clam up.

  • To clam up.

  • A clam is a shellfish, it's a type of seafood.

  • Delicious.

  • But to clam up has nothing to do with shellfish.

  • I could say, "I asked him where he was last night

  • "and he quickly clammed up."

  • If he clammed up it means

  • he shut his mouth, stopped talking.

  • And it means to stop talking quite suddenly and abruptly.

  • Now the next one,

  • I can't remember if I've mentioned this in a video before.

  • Maybe, but I think it's very relevant

  • and important for this video,

  • it is to hold one's horses.

  • So it could be said as an exclamation,

  • "Hold your horses!"

  • "Hold your horses!"

  • It means "Wait and be patient!

  • "Stop being impatient."

  • I remember my mom always used to say this to me,

  • especially when it was snowing.

  • I always wanted to get outside,

  • go in the snow and she used to say,

  • "Hold your horses.

  • "If you're going out on the snow,

  • "you need to wear a hat, you need to wear a scarf,

  • "we need to get your coat on."

  • And I was too excited, I had ants in my pants.

  • I had to hold my horses and I had to wait and be patient.

  • The next one is to be in the dog house.

  • To be in the dog house.

  • So I might say, "My dad came back

  • "very late from the pub last night

  • "and now he's in the dog house."

  • To be in the dog house means

  • that you are in trouble with another person.

  • So my dad is in trouble with my mom.

  • My mom is not happy with my dad

  • and she's put him, not literally, in the dog house.

  • Now the next one is such a useful one.

  • I use it all the time.

  • It is to kill two birds with one stone.

  • And you might be able to work out what it means actually.

  • And I'd love to know as well

  • if you have an alternative for this in your language.

  • Please, please, please comment below.

  • I love it when you talk about

  • idioms being the same in your language.

  • To kill two birds with one stone

  • is to get two things done,

  • to complete two tasks with just one effort.

  • If I pick up my friend from school

  • and I go shopping on the same trip,

  • I killed two birds with one stone

  • because I've done two things with just one trip.

  • Okay, what's my next one?

  • Straight from the horse's mouth.

  • If you hear something straight from the horse's mouth

  • it means that you are hearing it from the original source.

  • So if someone asks me, "Are you sure you're right

  • "about that piece of news?"

  • I'll say, "I heard it straight from the horse's mouth.

  • "They told me directly."

  • And the last one is to smell a rat.

  • "Hmm, I smell a rat here."

  • Now, I actually really like rats

  • and they're actually quite clean and shouldn't smell.

  • But if you smell a rat,

  • it means that you suspect trickery

  • or wrongdoing in a situation.

  • So if something is maybe too good to be true,

  • like for example I've just had a Nigerian prince

  • tell me that I've won 20 million dollars

  • and all I have to do is send him my bank details.

  • My mom might say to me, "Lucy, I smell a rat.

  • "I think there's trickery going on here."

  • Yeah, so to smell a rat is to suspect trickery

  • or malicious intent.

  • Right guys, that's it for today's lesson.

  • As I've said before,

  • if you have any of the translations for these idioms

  • in your own language,

  • please comment them below

  • and remember to mention which language you're talking about.

  • Also, if you'd like to contribute subtitle translations,

  • you can do that by following the link in the description box

  • and you can translate the subtitles for this video

  • into your own language,

  • so you can help people

  • who aren't at such a high level as you are.

  • Also, don't forget to check out Lingoda.

  • The link is also in the description box

  • and you can use the code that I mentioned before.

  • Don't forget to connect with me

  • on all of my social media.

  • I've got my Facebook, I've got my Instagram,

  • and I've got my Twitter.

  • And I will see you soon for another lesson.

  • Mwah!

  • (electronic music)

(electronic music)

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A2 初級

9つの英語イディオムと説明と例文 (9 English Idioms with Explanations and Examples )

  • 111 13
    Amanda Chang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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