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  • Hi. Welcome to engVid. I'm Adam.

  • In today's video I want to talk to you about a particular type of adjective

  • that many people often confuse, especially beginners, but this is also good for intermediate, even advanced students.

  • We're talking about the "ed" and the "ing" adjectives. Okay?

  • So, for example: "bored" and "boring", "interested" and "interesting".

  • Now, the reason it's important to know the difference between these is because what you

  • say about yourself sometimes, how you describe things can be very confusing to a native speaker

  • especially, but to other people as well if you mix these two up.

  • Now, what does it mean to be bored and what does it mean to be boring?

  • When we talk about "bored", we're describing a feeling.

  • Okay?

  • When we talk about "interested", we're describing a feeling.

  • So all of the "ed" adjectives are actually feelings, and you can only use them to talk

  • about people and sometimes animals.

  • Why?

  • Because things, like chairs, or tables, or whatever, they don't have feelings.

  • A movie, a book doesn't have feelings.

  • TV shows, for example, movies, books, whatever, they cause a feeling in a person.

  • So the "ing" adjectives cause the feeling.

  • The "ed" adjectives are the feeling.

  • Okay? So very important.

  • Only people and animals for the "ed", and for the "ing" you can use people, animals,

  • things, situations, places, ideas, basically any noun because you're describing them.

  • You're describing how they make people feel.

  • So now you're wondering: "Well, I have people here and I have people here,

  • so how can I use 'boring' for people and for...

  • And 'bored' for people?"

  • Sorry. So what we have here, again, feeling and cause of feeling.

  • So if you say: "I'm bored" means that I'm not having fun, I want to go do something else.

  • If I say: "I am boring" means you're not having fun and want to go do something else.

  • So if I am boring means that you are bored.

  • If the movie is boring, then I am bored. Okay?

  • So one thing-the "ing"-causes the feeling-"ed"-in the person.

  • Very important to understand that.

  • So: "I am bored by the movie which is boring.

  • I am interested in this lesson because this lesson is very interesting."

  • Right?

  • "I'm excited, something is exciting."

  • So, for example, I'm excited to go see the concert because this artist is very exciting,

  • this singer or whatever.

  • "I am worried", now people don't realize that "worried" can have "worrying" as another adjective.

  • "The situation is worrying" means the situation is making me feel worried.

  • Okay? Maybe the whole global political situation, whatever.

  • Now, hopefully none of you are confused by this lesson because I'm trying to make it

  • not confusing.

  • Okay? Everybody okay with that?

  • So very important to understand all these nouns can use "ing" because they're creating

  • the feeling, all these adjectives can only be used for people, again, sometimes animals.

  • A dog sees...

  • Sees you coming home after a long day, gets very excited.

  • Its, you know, tail wagging in the back.

  • Dogs don't usually get bored, they just go to sleep.

  • So, animals sometimes.

  • Now, I just want to point out one other thing: Don't confuse feeling adjectives with "ed"

  • with actual feelings.

  • Okay?

  • If somebody is loved, does he feel loved?

  • Maybe yes, maybe no.

  • We're not talking about that person's feelings.

  • "Hated", "envied", these are all feeling words, but these are all verbs.

  • Okay?

  • "He is loved" means somebody loves him or her.

  • "She is loved.", "This person is hated."

  • But we can also use these about things.

  • Okay?

  • "The company is hated."

  • So some companies they do not such nice things or maybe they go to a poor country and use

  • very cheap labour, so this company is hated.

  • So people hate this company.

  • So keep in mind that these are feeling words, but used as verbs; whereas these are other

  • verbs used as adjectives.

  • Okay? Very important to distinguish between these words.

  • I hope this was clear enough.

  • One more thing to say, there's a very long list of these kinds of adjectives, you can just Google them

  • if you need to or you can even ask me in the forum at www.engvid.com.

  • There's a place you can ask questions, feel free to ask me about other examples of these.

  • But there's also a quiz at www.engvid.com where I'll give you more examples of these

  • kinds of adjectives, and you can practice using them in sentences.

  • Make sure you understand the context: "Is somebody feeling this?

  • Is something causing this?" etc.

  • Also, give me a like if you like this video, and don't forget to subscribe to my channel.

  • And I'll see you again very soon for another good lesson.

  • Hopefully an interesting lesson so you're interested and not confused.

  • See you then.

Hi. Welcome to engVid. I'm Adam.

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A1 初級

退屈なのか、退屈なのか?英語の形容詞-EDと-INGについて学ぶ (Bored or Boring? Learn about -ED and -ING adjectives in English)

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    列空坐 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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