Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Thank you very much.

    翻訳: Chihiro M 校正: Lily Yichen Shi

  • Please excuse me for sitting; I'm very old.

    どうもありがとう

  • (Laughter)

    座らせてください 高齢なのでね

  • Well, the topic I'm going to discuss

    (笑)

  • is one which is, in a certain sense, very peculiar

    これから話す話題は

  • because it's very old.

    ある意味でちょっと珍しいことです

  • Roughness is part of human life

    とても古いのでね

  • forever and forever,

    荒さは 人間の活動の一部です

  • and ancient authors have written about it.

    これからもずっと

  • It was very much uncontrollable,

    古代の学者がそのことについて書いています

  • and in a certain sense,

    荒さはまったく制御できないものだと

  • it seemed to be the extreme of complexity,

    ある意味では

  • just a mess, a mess and a mess.

    荒さは非常に複雑なように見えます

  • There are many different kinds of mess.

    単にぐちゃぐちゃで きたなくて散らかっているように

  • Now, in fact,

    いろいろな種類の乱雑な状態があります

  • by a complete fluke,

    実は

  • I got involved many years ago

    完全な偶然によって

  • in a study of this form of complexity,

    何年も前に私は

  • and to my utter amazement,

    この複雑さの世界に飛び込みました

  • I found traces --

    とても驚いたことに

  • very strong traces, I must say --

    私は手がかりを見つけたのです

  • of order in that roughness.

    とても確かな手がかり

  • And so today, I would like to present to you

    荒さの秩序と言うほかにありません

  • a few examples

    今日は お見せしたいと思います

  • of what this represents.

    このことが何を示しているか

  • I prefer the word roughness

    いくつかの例を

  • to the word irregularity

    私は荒さという言葉が好きです

  • because irregularity --

    不規則さという言葉よりも

  • to someone who had Latin

    なぜなら不規則さは

  • in my long-past youth --

    若かったころの私のように

  • means the contrary of regularity.

    ラテン語を勉強したことのある人にとって

  • But it is not so.

    規則正しいことの反対の意味を持っています

  • Regularity is the contrary of roughness

    でもそうではありません

  • because the basic aspect of the world

    規則正しさは荒さの反対語です

  • is very rough.

    なぜなら世界の基本となっていることは

  • So let me show you a few objects.

    とても荒いからです

  • Some of them are artificial.

    では いくつか絵をお見せしましょう

  • Others of them are very real, in a certain sense.

    これらのうち いくつかは人工的に作られています

  • Now this is the real. It's a cauliflower.

    他のものはある意味で とても現実的です

  • Now why do I show a cauliflower,

    これは本物です 野菜のカリフラワー

  • a very ordinary and ancient vegetable?

    では なぜ一般的で古くからある野菜

  • Because old and ancient as it may be,

    このカリフラワーを見せたのか

  • it's very complicated and it's very simple,

    その理由は 古いかもしれませんが

  • both at the same time.

    この野菜はとても複雑で とても単純だからです

  • If you try to weigh it -- of course it's very easy to weigh it,

    両方とも

  • and when you eat it, the weight matters --

    カリフラワーの重さを計るとき もちろんとても簡単に計れます

  • but suppose you try to

    また食べるときには 重さは重要ですね

  • measure its surface.

    では このようなことを考えてみてください

  • Well, it's very interesting.

    その表面を測ろうとしましょう

  • If you cut, with a sharp knife,

    とてもおもしろいですよ

  • one of the florets of a cauliflower

    よく研いだナイフで

  • and look at it separately,

    カリフラワーのつぼみを

  • you think of a whole cauliflower, but smaller.

    切り落としてみると

  • And then you cut again,

    それは 小さいカリフラワーに見えますね

  • again, again, again, again, again, again, again, again,

    さらに切っていきます

  • and you still get small cauliflowers.

    また切って 切って 切って どんどん切りましょう

  • So the experience of humanity

    でもそこには また小さいカリフラワーがあります

  • has always been that there are some shapes

    人間の経験では

  • which have this peculiar property,

    こういう珍しい特徴を持つ形は

  • that each part is like the whole,

    いつも存在しています

  • but smaller.

    それぞれの部分は 全体の形と似ていますが

  • Now, what did humanity do with that?

    もっと小さいもの

  • Very, very little.

    では 人間はこの特徴に関して何をしたでしょうか

  • (Laughter)

    本当に少しのことだけです

  • So what I did actually is to

    (笑)

  • study this problem,

    私が実際にやったことは

  • and I found something quite surprising.

    この問題を研究すること

  • That one can measure roughness

    そして大変驚くべきいくつかの発見をしました

  • by a number, a number,

    私たちは 荒さを測ることができます

  • 2.3, 1.2 and sometimes much more.

    数によって

  • One day, a friend of mine,

    2.3 1.2 時々もっと大きい数字になります

  • to bug me,

    あるとき 私の友人のひとりが

  • brought a picture and said,

    私を困らせるために

  • "What is the roughness of this curve?"

    ある絵を持ってきて このように言いました

  • I said, "Well, just short of 1.5."

    『この曲線の荒さはいくつだい』

  • It was 1.48.

    『そうだね 1.5よりちょっと小さいくらいかな』と答えました

  • Now, it didn't take me any time.

    それは1.48でした

  • I've been looking at these things for so long.

    いくらも時間はかかりません

  • So these numbers are the numbers

    このようなことを研究してきましたのでね

  • which denote the roughness of these surfaces.

    これらの数字は

  • I hasten to say that these surfaces

    このような表面の荒さを示す数値です

  • are completely artificial.

    これらの表面は 完全に

  • They were done on a computer,

    人工的だということを言わねばなりません

  • and the only input is a number,

    これらはコンピューターによってつくられました

  • and that number is roughness.

    入力したものは 数字だけです

  • So on the left,

    そしてこの数字こそが荒さなのです

  • I took the roughness copied from many landscapes.

    左の写真には

  • To the right, I took a higher roughness.

    たくさんの風景写真から得た荒さを使いました

  • So the eye, after a while,

    右の写真には もっと高い荒さを使いました

  • can distinguish these two very well.

    しばらくすると 目は

  • Humanity had to learn about measuring roughness.

    この2つをとてもよく見分けることが できるようになります

  • This is very rough, and this is sort of smooth, and this perfectly smooth.

    人は荒さを測ることを学ばなければならなかったのです

  • Very few things are very smooth.

    これはとても荒い これはなめらか これは完全になめらか というように

  • So then if you try to ask questions:

    わずかなものだけが 本当になめらかです

  • "What's the surface of a cauliflower?"

    それでは 質問をしてみましょう

  • Well, you measure and measure and measure.

    カリフラワーの表面積は何ですか

  • Each time you're closer, it gets bigger,

    何度も何度も何度も 計測するでしょう

  • down to very, very small distances.

    より精密に行うと 答えは毎回より大きくなります

  • What's the length of the coastline

    とっても小さい間隔で測ったらね

  • of these lakes?

    では この湖の海岸線の長さは

  • The closer you measure, the longer it is.

    いくつですか

  • The concept of length of coastline,

    より精密に計測すると それは長くなってしまいます

  • which seems to be so natural

    海岸線の長さの定義は

  • because it's given in many cases,

    それがとても自然なように見えるのは

  • is, in fact, complete fallacy; there's no such thing.

    たくさんの事例があるからであって

  • You must do it differently.

    実は 完全に間違った考えなのです そのようなものは無いのです

  • What good is that, to know these things?

    違う方法で計測しなければならないのです

  • Well, surprisingly enough,

    このようなことを知って どうしますか

  • it's good in many ways.

    とても驚くことに

  • To begin with, artificial landscapes,

    たくさんのことができるのです

  • which I invented sort of,

    まず初めに 人工的な風景は

  • are used in cinema all the time.

    いくらか私が生み出したものですが

  • We see mountains in the distance.

    映画の中でずっと使われています

  • They may be mountains, but they may be just formulae, just cranked on.

    遠くに山が見えますね

  • Now it's very easy to do.

    山かもしれませんが たくさんの方程式かもしれません

  • It used to be very time-consuming, but now it's nothing.

    簡単にできます

  • Now look at that. That's a real lung.

    以前は時間を食ったものですが いまはどうってことありません

  • Now a lung is something very strange.

    それではこれを見てみましょう 本物の肺です

  • If you take this thing,

    肺はとても奇妙な器官です

  • you know very well it weighs very little.

    肺はとても軽いと

  • The volume of a lung is very small,

    私たちがよく分かっています

  • but what about the area of the lung?

    肺の体積はとても小さいのです

  • Anatomists were arguing very much about that.

    では 肺の表面積はどうでしょうか

  • Some say that a normal male's lung

    解剖学者はこのことをいつも議論しています

  • has an area of the inside

    通常の男性の肺は バスケットボールのコートと

  • of a basketball [court].

    同程度の面積を持っている

  • And the others say, no, five basketball [courts].

    と言う人はいますが

  • Enormous disagreements.

    『いや バスケットボールコート5つ分』だと言う人もいます

  • Why so? Because, in fact, the area of the lung

    たいへんな違いですね

  • is something very ill-defined.

    どうしてそうなるのでしょう なぜなら 肺の表面積は

  • The bronchi branch, branch, branch

    はっきりと定義されていないからなのです

  • and they stop branching,

    枝状に分かれた気管支が さらに分かれ また分かれています

  • not because of any matter of principle,

    分岐が終わるということは

  • but because of physical considerations:

    何かの法則によるのではなく

  • the mucus, which is in the lung.

    物理的な理由 つまり

  • So what happens is that in a way

    肺の中にある粘液がそれを決めるのです

  • you have a much bigger lung,

    何が起こっているかというと

  • but it branches and branches

    人間は十分に大きい肺を持っているということです

  • down to distances about the same for a whale, for a man

    もしも肺が細かく枝分かれしていたら

  • and for a little rodent.

    クジラの肺も人間の肺も 加えて小さいネズミも

  • Now, what good is it to have that?

    同じ長さをを持つことになります

  • Well, surprisingly enough, amazingly enough,

    そのような肺を持つことで 何が優れているのでしょう

  • the anatomists had a very poor idea

    驚くことに 非常に驚いたことに

  • of the structure of the lung until very recently.

    解剖学者はほんの最近まで 肺の構造について

  • And I think that my mathematics,

    つたない考えしか 持っていなかったのです

  • surprisingly enough,

    私の数学的な方法は

  • has been of great help

    驚いたことに

  • to the surgeons

    とても大きな役割を果たしました

  • studying lung illnesses

    外科医は

  • and also kidney illnesses,

    肺の疾患や

  • all these branching systems,

    腎臓疾患を研究していますが

  • for which there was no geometry.

    このような枝分かれの形状をしているために

  • So I found myself, in other words,

    構造的に理解できないからです

  • constructing a geometry,

    言い換えると

  • a geometry of things which had no geometry.

    幾何学を作り出した つまり

  • And a surprising aspect of it

    幾何構造を持たない対象のための 幾何学を発明したのです

  • is that very often, the rules of this geometry

    その驚くべき一面は

  • are extremely short.

    この幾何学の法則は

  • You have formulas that long.

    とても短いことです

  • And you crank it several times.

    あなたがたは長い式があるとき

  • Sometimes repeatedly: again, again, again,

    何度も展開してみるでしょう

  • the same repetition.

    ときには何度も何度も繰り返して

  • And at the end, you get things like that.

    同じ繰り返しをね

  • This cloud is completely,

    最終的にこのようなものを得るでしょう

  • 100 percent artificial.

    この雲は完全に

  • Well, 99.9.

    100%人工的に作られました

  • And the only part which is natural

    99.9%かな

  • is a number, the roughness of the cloud,

    この中でたった一つ自然なことは

  • which is taken from nature.

    雲の荒さを表す数字です

  • Something so complicated like a cloud,

    自然界からもらった数字です

  • so unstable, so varying,

    雲のような複雑なものは

  • should have a simple rule behind it.

    安定していなくて 変わりやすいですが

  • Now this simple rule

    その裏側には単純な規則を持っているのです

  • is not an explanation of clouds.

    この単純な規則は

  • The seer of clouds had to

    雲を説明するためではありません

  • take account of it.

    天気予報士は

  • I don't know how much advanced

    その規則に注意しなければなりません

  • these pictures are. They're old.

    これらの絵がどれだけ進歩したのかわかりませんが

  • I was very much involved in it,

    古いものなのです

  • but then turned my attention to other phenomena.

    私はこのことにとても深く携わっていましたが

  • Now, here is another thing

    他の現象にも注目するようになりました

  • which is rather interesting.

    さて これは

  • One of the shattering events

    さらに面白いことです

  • in the history of mathematics,

    数学を破壊したある事件は

  • which is not appreciated by many people,

    数学の歴史の中で

  • occurred about 130 years ago,

    多くの人には歓迎されませんでしたが

  • 145 years ago.

    およそ130年前か

  • Mathematicians began to create

    145年前に起こりました

  • shapes that didn't exist.

    数学者たちが

  • Mathematicians got into self-praise

    自然に存在し得ない形を 創造し始めたのです

  • to an extent which was absolutely amazing,

    数学者は自画自賛しはじめました

  • that man can invent things

    ある程度はすごいことだったのです

  • that nature did not know.

    人間が生み出すことができるということが

  • In particular, it could invent

    自然さえ知らないことをね

  • things like a curve which fills the plane.

    とくに このようなものをつくり出しました

  • A curve's a curve, a plane's a plane,

    平面を埋め尽くす曲線です

  • and the two won't mix.

    曲線は曲線 平面は平面

  • Well, they do mix.

    この2つは決して混じり合いません

  • A man named Peano

    彼らはそれを組み合わせたのです

  • did define such curves,

    ジュゼッペ・ペアノという人物が

  • and it became an object of extraordinary interest.

    このような曲線を定義しました

  • It was very important, but mostly interesting

    そして非常に興味深い図形となったのです

  • because a kind of break,

    それはとても重要で 面白いのは

  • a separation between

    数学の境界だったからです

  • the mathematics coming from reality, on the one hand,

    それは

  • and new mathematics coming from pure man's mind.

    現実から生み出したきた今までの数学と

  • Well, I was very sorry to point out

    純粋に人間の思考が生み出した 新しい数学との

  • that the pure man's mind

    このことを指摘することが残念なのですが

  • has, in fact,

    純粋な人間の思考は

  • seen at long last

    実は

  • what had been seen for a long time.

    結局のところ

  • And so here I introduce something,

    長い間 見たことのあるものに基づいているのです

  • the set of rivers of a plane-filling curve.

    そしてこれは私が導入したもので

  • And well,

    平面充填曲線(ペアノ曲線)の流れの集合です

  • it's a story unto itself.

    これも

  • So it was in 1875 to 1925,

    それ自体に同じ説明が成り立ちます

  • an extraordinary period

    1875年から1925年は

  • in which mathematics prepared itself to break out from the world.

    とても驚くべき時代でした

  • And the objects which were used

    世界中から突然に 数学が数学自体を作り始めたのです

  • as examples, when I was

    そして 例えば

  • a child and a student, as examples

    私がまだ

  • of the break between mathematics

    子どもで学生だったとき

  • and visible reality --

    数学と 現実世界との間には

  • those objects,

    このような研究対象が

  • I turned them completely around.

    ありました

  • I used them for describing

    私はこれらの周りを徹底的に研究したのです

  • some of the aspects of the complexity of nature.

    私はこれを説明するために

  • Well, a man named Hausdorff in 1919

    まったくもって複雑な自然の原理を用いました

  • introduced a number which was just a mathematical joke,

    1919年にフェリックス・ハウスドルフという人物が

  • and I found that this number

    単なる数学的な冗談としてある数字を 導入しました

  • was a good measurement of roughness.

    そして私はこの数字が

  • When I first told it to my friends in mathematics

    荒さを良く表すものだと発見したのです

  • they said, "Don't be silly. It's just something [silly]."

    数学者の友人らにそのことを話したとき

  • Well actually, I was not silly.

    『ばかなことを言うな。ただの数字だろう』と言われました

  • The great painter Hokusai knew it very well.

    実際 私はばかげてなどいませんでした

  • The things on the ground are algae.

    画家の北斎はそのことをとても良く知っていました

  • He did not know the mathematics; it didn't yet exist.

    地面にあるのは藻です

  • And he was Japanese who had no contact with the West.

    彼は数学は知らなかったでしょう 存在さえしていませんでした

  • But painting for a long time had a fractal side.

    それに彼は日本人で 西洋とのつながりは持っていませんでした

  • I could speak of that for a long time.

    しかし 浮世絵は長いことフラクタルと 同じ性質を持っていました

  • The Eiffel Tower has a fractal aspect.

    私はそのことをいくらでも話すことができます

  • I read the book that Mr. Eiffel wrote about his tower,

    エッフェル塔もフラクタルの性質を持っています

  • and indeed it was astonishing how much he understood.

    エッフェル塔についての ギュスターブ・エッフェルの本を読んだことがありますが

  • This is a mess, mess, mess, Brownian loop.

    彼がとても良く理解していたことに 本当に驚きました

  • One day I decided --

    これはとてもぐちゃぐちゃな ブラウン運動がつくる軌跡です

  • halfway through my career,

    あるとき

  • I was held by so many things in my work --

    私の学者としての半ばで

  • I decided to test myself.

    たくさんの仕事を持ちすぎていたので

  • Could I just look at something

    私自身を試してみることにしました

  • which everybody had been looking at for a long time

    私はただ見ることができるだろうか

  • and find something dramatically new?

    だれもが長いあいだ見ているものを

  • Well,