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  • What I am always thinking about

    私は この集いの内容と同じく

  • is what this session is about, which is called simplicity.

    常に簡素さに関して考えています

  • And almost, I would almost call it being simple-minded,

    簡潔さとは 単純な性格を指すように思いますが

  • but in the best sense of the word.

    その言葉が持つ良い意味でとらえてください

  • I'm trying to figure out two very simple things:

    私が追求するのは 非常に単純な二つの事

  • how to live and how to die, period.

    いかに生きて いかに死ぬか

  • That's all I'm trying to do, all day long.

    一日中それしか考えていません

  • And I'm also trying to have some meals, and have some snacks,

    他にも食事をしたり おやつをつまんだり

  • and, you know, and yell at my children, and do all the normal things

    子どもに大声を上げたり 普通のことをやって

  • that keep you grounded.

    しっかりしていなくちゃいけません

  • So, I was fortunate enough to be born a very dreamy child.

    私は幸運にも夢見る少女として生まれました

  • My older sister was busy torturing my parents,

    姉は両親に手を焼かせていたし

  • and they were busy torturing her.

    両親も姉のことで手いっぱいだったので

  • I was lucky enough to be completely ignored,

    幸運にも 私は完全にほったらかしにされていました

  • which is a fabulous thing, actually, I want to tell you.

    なんとも ありがたいことです

  • So, I was able to completely daydream my way through my life.

    おかげで ずっと空想にふけっていることができ

  • And I finally daydreamed my way into NYU, at a very good time, in 1967,

    1967年という良い時期に 夢見がちなままニューヨーク大学に入学しました

  • where I met a man who was trying to blow up the math building of NYU.

    そこでニューヨーク大学の数学科の建物を爆破しようとした男と出会い

  • And I was writing terrible poetry and knitting sweaters for him.

    彼にセンスのない詩を書いたり セーターを編んだりしました

  • And feminists hated us, and the whole thing was wretched

    フェミニストは私たちを嫌って 最初から終わりまで全てが

  • from beginning to end.

    悲惨でした

  • But I kept writing bad poetry, and he didn't blow up the math building,

    でも私は詩を書き続け 彼は爆破計画を実行せずに

  • but he went to Cuba.

    キューバへ行ってしまいました

  • But I gave him the money, because I was from Riverdale

    でも彼にはお金をあげました

  • so I had more money than he did.

    恵まれた環境にいたのでね

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And that was a good thing to help, you know, the cause.

    彼の使命を助けるには良かったのですが

  • But, then he came back, and things happened,

    彼が帰って来て 事の成り行きが変わりました

  • and I decided I really hated my writing,

    私は自分の文章が嫌になったのです

  • that it was awful, awful, purple prose.

    あまりにも表現が華やか過ぎて ひどい作品でした

  • And I decided that I wanted to tell --

    それでもやっぱり私は

  • but I still wanted to tell a narrative story

    物語を書きたかったのです

  • and I still wanted to tell my stories.

    自分の物語というやつね

  • So I decided that I would start to draw. How hard could that be?

    それで絵を描く事にしました 簡単でしょう

  • And so what happened was that I started

    それで何をしたかと言うと 私は

  • just becoming an editorial illustrator through, you know,

    編集イラストレーターになりました

  • sheer whatever, sheer ignorance.

    まったくの無知から始めたんです

  • And we started a studio.

    私たちはスタジオを開きました

  • Well, Tibor really started the studio, called M&Co.

    M&Company というスタジオです

  • And the premise of M&Co was, we don't know anything,

    M&Companyは専門知識は何もないけど

  • but that's all right, we're going to do it anyway.

    とにかくやってみましょう というものでした

  • And as a matter of fact, it's better not to know anything,

    知らないほうがいい事もあります

  • because if you know too much, you're stymied.

    知りすぎていて困る事もありますからね

  • So, the premise in the studio was,

    ですから 我々のスタートは

  • there are no boundaries, there is no fear.

    境界線も恐怖も無い というものでした

  • And I -- and my full-time job, I landed the best job on Earth,

    そして私はこの世で最高の仕事にありつけたのです

  • was to daydream, and to actually come up with absurd ideas

    それは空想して おかしな考えを思いつく事

  • that -- fortunately, there were enough people there,

    幸運にもチームを組むだけの

  • and it was a team, it was a collective,

    十分な人がいて

  • it was not just me coming up with crazy ideas.

    他にも馬鹿げた考えの人はいましたが

  • But the point was that I was there as myself, as a dreamer.

    でも私は空想家として私自身でいました

  • And so some of the things -- I mean, it was a long history of M&Co,

    M&Companyは長いこと

  • and clearly we also needed to make some money,

    明らかに利益を上げなければならず

  • so we decided we would create a series of products.

    さまざまな商品をつくることにしました

  • And some of the watches there,

    ここに見える時計は

  • attempting to be beautiful and humorous --

    美しさとユーモアを出そうと努力しています

  • maybe not attempting, hopefully succeeding.

    努力というより 成功を狙っているのかも

  • That to be able to talk about content,

    内容について話し

  • to break apart what you normally expect, to use humor and surprise,

    通念をとっぱらって ユーモアや驚き

  • elegance and humanity in your work was really important to us.

    上品さや人間味を取り入れることを優先したのです

  • It was a very high, it was a very impersonal time in design

    その頃のデザインは人間味のない時代で

  • and we wanted to say, the content is what's important,

    私たちが言いたかったのは

  • not the package, not the wrapping.

    内容が大事だということ

  • You really have to be journalists, you have to be inventors,

    ジャーナリストや発明家になる必要があり

  • you have to use your imagination more importantly than anything.

    何よりも大事なのは想像力を使う事です

  • So, the good news is that I have a dog

    私には飼い犬がいます

  • and, though I don't know if I believe in luck --

    私は運を信じるかはわかりませんし

  • I don't know what I believe in, it's a very complicated question,

    何を信じているのかも複雑すぎてわかりませんが

  • but I do know that before I go away, I crank his tail seven times.

    私は旅に出る前に 愛犬のしっぽを7回ぐるぐる回します

  • So, whenever he sees a suitcase in the house,

    いつも誰かが旅行に出かける家で

  • because everybody's always, you know, leaving,

    みんながしっぽをぐるぐる回すものだから

  • they're always cranking this wonderful dog's tail,

    家の中でスーツケースが目に入ると

  • and he runs to the other room.

    犬は他の部屋へ行ってしまいます

  • But I am able to make the transition from working for children and --

    私は子ども向けの本も 大人向けの本も

  • from working for adults to children, and back and forth,

    どちらも書けます

  • because, you know, I can say that I'm immature,

    なぜなら ある意味で

  • and in a way, that's true.

    私は大人になっていないからです

  • I don't really -- I mean, I could tell you that I didn't understand,

    自慢にはなりませんが 打ち明けてしまうと

  • I'm not proud of it, but I didn't understand

    今回のTEDで聴いた講演の

  • let's say 95 percent of the talks at this conference.

    95%は理解できませんでした

  • But I have been taking beautiful notes of drawings

    でも素晴らしい絵を描いたんです

  • and I have a gorgeous onion from Murray Gell-Mann's talk.

    ゲルマンの講演では 見事な玉ねぎを描けたし

  • And I have a beautiful page of doodles from Jonathan Woodham's talk.

    ウッダムの講演でも 様々な絵を描けました

  • So, good things come out of, you know, incomprehension --

    理解できないことからも 良い事は生まれるのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • -- which I will do a painting of, and then it will end up in my work.

    描いた絵は 後に私の作品になります

  • So, I'm open to the possibilities of not knowing

    ですから 知らなかった内容も受け入れて

  • and finding out something new.

    新しいものを生み出しています

  • So, in writing for children, it seems simple, and it is.

    子ども向けの本を書くのは見た目どおり簡単です

  • You have to condense a story into 32 pages, usually.

    たいてい 物語を32ページに集約しなくてはいけません

  • And what you have to do is, you really have to edit down to what you want to say.

    大切なのは伝えたい内容だけに編集すること

  • And hopefully, you're not talking down to kids

    そして子どもを見下すような言い方はせず

  • and you're not talking in such a way that you,

    一度読んだら おしまい というような

  • you know, couldn't stand reading it after one time.

    語りにはしないことです

  • So, I hopefully am writing, you know,

    ですから おそらく私の書く本は

  • books that are good for children and for adults.

    誰もが楽しめる本です

  • But the painting reflects --

    でも私が描く絵は

  • I don't think differently for children than I do for adults.

    子どもと大人と対象に関わらず

  • I try to use the same kind of imagination, the same kind of whimsy,

    想像力も 風変わりなアイデアも

  • the same kind of love of language.

    言葉に対する愛情も同じように使っています

  • So, you know, and I have lots of wonderful-looking friends.

    私の友人はかっこいい人が多く

  • This is Andrew Gatz, and he walked in through the door and I said,

    アンドリュー ギャッツが訪れてきた時は

  • "You! Sit down there." You know, I take lots of photos.

    座ってもらって 写真をたくさん撮りました

  • And the Bertoia chair in the background is my favorite chair.

    後ろにあるのはお気に入りの椅子

  • So, I get to put in all of the things that I love.

    好きなものは絵に取り入れます

  • Hopefully, a dialog between adults and children will happen on many different levels,

    大人と子どもの会話が いろいろなレベルで繰り広げられるでしょうし

  • and hopefully different kinds of humor will evolve.

    様々なユーモアも生まれると思います

  • And the books are really journals of my life.

    本とは私の人生の日記です

  • I never -- I don't like plots.

    構想をたてるのは好きではありません

  • I don't know what a plot means.

    あらすじという意味が私にはわかりません

  • I can't stand the idea of anything that starts in the beginning,

    始まり 中間 終わりという流れに

  • you know, beginning, middle and end. It really scares me,

    耐えられないんです

  • because my life is too random and too confused,

    なぜなら私の人生自体が行き当たりばったりで ごちゃごちゃしていて

  • and I enjoy it that way.

    それを楽しんでいるからです

  • But anyway, so we were in Venice,

    さて 私たちがベネチアにいたときのことです

  • and this is our room. And I had this dream

    これは私たちの部屋で こんな夢を見ました

  • that I was wearing this fantastic green gown,

    私が素敵な緑のガウンを着ていて

  • and I was looking out the window,

    外を眺めています

  • and it was really a beautiful thing.

    素敵なイメージだったので

  • And so, I was able to put that into this story, which is an alphabet,

    アルファベットの話の中に取り入れました

  • and hopefully go on to something else.

    違ったものへと変化していくと思います

  • The letter C had other things in it.

    Cのページには違う事を書いてあります

  • I was fortunate also, to meet the man who's sitting on the bed,

    ベッドに座っている男性に会えたのも幸いでした

  • though I gave him hair over here and he doesn't have hair.

    彼には髪の毛があるように描きました

  • Well, he has some hair but -- well, he used to have hair.

    髪の毛が薄い人なんでね

  • And with him, I was able to do a project that was really fantastic.

    彼と取り組んだ素晴らしい企画があります

  • I work for the New Yorker, and I do covers, and 9/11 happened

    私はニューヨーカー誌の表紙を担当しているのですが 同時多発テロが起こり

  • and it was, you know, a complete and utter end of the world as we knew it.

    世界の完全なる終わりとでも言うような状況でした

  • And Rick and I were on our way to a party in the Bronx,

    彼とパーティに行くのに ブロンクスに向かっていたとき

  • and somebody said Bronxistan,

    ある人が ブロンキスタンと言い

  • and somebody said Ferreristan,

    ある人はファレリスタンと言いました

  • and we came up with this New Yorker cover,

    そこからニューヨーカー誌の この表紙が生まれました

  • which we were able to -- we didn't know what we were doing.

    その時はよくわからなかったけれど

  • We weren't trying to be funny, we weren't trying to be --

    ふざけていたのではありません

  • well, we were trying to be funny actually, that's not true.

    実はね 面白がっていたの

  • We hoped we'd be funny, but we didn't know it would be a cover,

    面白いだろうって思ったけど 表紙になるとは知らなかったんです

  • and we didn't know that that image, at the moment that it happened,

    当初は この絵がたくさんの人に

  • would be something that would be so wonderful for a lot of people.

    気に入られるとは思いもしませんでした

  • And it really became the -- I don't know, you know,

    ここに書いてある内容を見て

  • it was one of those moments people started laughing at what was going on.

    たくさんの人の笑いをとれたんです

  • And from, you know, Fattushis, to Taxistan to, you know,

    ファットシとかタクシスタンなんて感じに 架空の

  • for the Fashtoonks, Botoxia, Pashmina, Khlintunisia, you know,

    人種を作り上げて名前をつけました

  • we were able to take the city

    この街を使って

  • and make fun of this completely foreign, who are -- what's going on over here?

    完全に異国であるものを笑いにしました

  • Who are these people? What are these tribes?

    他にはどんな人がいるの?ってね

  • And David Remnick, who was really wonderful about it,

    この案に乗り気だったデイビッド レムニックは

  • had one problem. He didn't like Al Zheimers,

    アルツハイマーは アルツハイマー病の人に対して失礼なので

  • because he thought it would insult people with Alzheimer's.

    やめたほうがいいと言いました

  • But you know, we said, "David, who's going to know?

    “彼らが気がつくと思う?” と彼に言いました

  • They're not."

    気づくはずないわよ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So it stayed in, and it was, and, you know, it was a good thing.

    それで結局 この案を使う事にしました

  • You know, in the course of my life, I never know what's going to happen

    私の人生において 何が起こるかなんてわかりません

  • and that's kind of the beauty part.

    そこがいいんですよね

  • And we were on Cape Cod, a place, obviously, of great inspiration,

    インスピレーションを得るには最高の場所であるケープコッドで

  • and I picked up this book, "The Elements of Style," at a yard sale.

    ヤードセールに行き 英語文章作法の本を見つけました

  • And I didn't -- and I'd never used it in school,

    学生時代に使った事はありませんでした

  • because I was too busy writing poems, and flunking out,

    詩を書いてばかりで勉強をせず

  • and I don't know what, sitting in cafes.

    カフェにいりびたっていたからです

  • But I picked it up and I started reading it and I thought, this book is amazing.

    でも読み始めてみると この本の素晴らしいこと!

  • I said, people should know about this book.

    この本の存在は知るべきよ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So I decided it needed a few -- it needed a lift, it needed a few illustrations.

    この本に少しイラストがあれば もっと良くなると思ったので

  • And basically, I called the, you know, I convinced the White Estate,

    出版社に電話をして説得して

  • and what an intersection of like, you know,

    ポーランド系ユダヤ人や

  • Polish Jew, you know, main WASP family. Here I am, saying,

    アングロサクソン系白人家族のような人が入り混じる中 私が

  • I'd like to do something to this book.

    この本に何かしたいと言うと

  • And they said yes, and they left me completely alone,

    承知してくれて 私に任せてくれました

  • which was a gorgeous, wonderful thing.

    本当に素晴らしいことでした

  • And I took the examples that they gave,

    彼らから見本をもらって

  • and just did 56 paintings, basically.

    56枚の絵を描きました

  • So, this is, I don't know if you can read this.

    ここには こう書いてあります

  • "Well, Susan, this is a fine mess you are in."

    “スーザン 窮地に入り込んでしまったね”

  • And when you're dealing with grammar,

    文法を扱うというのは

  • which is, you know, incredibly dry,

    非常に無味乾燥なものですが

  • E.B. White wrote such wonderful, whimsical -- and actually, Strunk --

    ストランク氏が素晴らしいものを書きました

  • and then you come to the rules and, you know,

    そして文法規則のページです

  • there are lots of grammar things. "Do you mind me asking a question?

    文法に関する表記がたくさんあります

  • Do you mind my asking a question?"

    meをmyに変えたニュアンスなんかもね

  • "Would, could, should, or would, should, could."

    助動詞の挿絵には

  • And "would" is Coco Chanel's lover, "should" is Edith Sitwell,

    ココ シャネルの愛人やエディス シットウェル

  • and "could" is an August Sander subject.

    オーガスト サンダーを用いています

  • And, "He noticed a large stain in the center of the rug."

    “彼はじゅうたんのシミに気がついた”

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So, there's a kind of British understatement, murder-mystery theme

    表現が英国風の殺人推理ものの絵は

  • that I really love very much.

    私のお気に入りです

  • And then, "Be obscure clearly! Be wild of tongue in a way we can understand."

    “わかりやすく曖昧となれ! 我々の理解できる方法で楽しい言葉となれ!”

  • E.B. White wrote us a number of rules,

    ホワイト氏が書いた規則を見ると

  • which can either paralyze you and make you loathe him

    無力にさせられるか

  • for the rest of time, or you can ignore them, which I do,

    私のように やる気をなくしたり どうでもよくなって

  • or you can, I don't know what, you know, eat a sandwich.

    サンドイッチを食べだしたりします

  • So, what I did when I was painting was I started singing,

    私は絵を描きながら歌をうたいました

  • because I really adore singing,

    私は歌が大好き

  • and I think that music is the highest form of all art.

    音楽とはすべての芸術の頂点にあると思います

  • So, I commissioned a wonderful composer, Nico Muhly,

    作曲家のニコ ミュリーに依頼して

  • who wrote nine songs using the text,

    本文を使って9曲作曲してもらい

  • and we performed this fantastic evening of --

    その曲を私たちが披露しました

  • he wrote music for both amateurs and professionals.

    彼はアマチュアとプロの両方に向けて音楽を書き

  • I played the clattering teacup and the slinky

    私がカップとおもちゃを使い

  • in the main reading room of the New York Public Library,

    ニューヨーク公共図書館でコンサートをしました

  • where you're supposed to be very, very quiet,

    普段は音を立ててはいけない場所で

  • and it was a phenomenally wonderful event,

    とても素晴らしい催しを行いました

  • which we hopefully will do some more.

    またやりたいと思っています

  • Who knows? The New York TimesSelect, the op-ed page,

    ニューヨークタイムズの論評に

  • asked me to do a column, and they said, you can do whatever you want.

    コラムを書きました 内容も任されていたので

  • So, once a month for the last year,

    去年は月に一度

  • I've been doing a column called "The Principles of Uncertainty,"

    「確信のなさの法則」と題したコラムを書きました

  • which, you know, I don't know who Heisenberg is,

    ハイゼンベルグって誰か知りませんけど

  • but I know I can throw that around now. You know,

    今となっては その言葉はわかります

  • it's the principles of uncertainty, so, you know.

    不確定性原理ですよね

  • I'm going to read quickly -- and probably I'm going to edit some,

    時間がないので省略しながら

  • because I don't have that much time left -- a few of the columns.

    ちょっとだけ読んでみます

  • And basically, I was so, you know, it was so amusing,

    面白かったのは 字数制限が気になって

  • because I said, "Well, how much space do I have?"

    尋ねたら

  • And they said, "Well, you know, it's the Internet."

    “インターネットだよ” と言われました

  • And I said, "Yes, but how much space do I have?"

    “でも どれくらい使えるの?” と尋ねると

  • And they said, "It's unlimited, it's unlimited."

    無制限だと言われました

  • OK. So, the first one I was very timid, and I'll begin.

    一作目はとても控えめです では読んでみます

  • "How can I tell you everything that is in my heart?

    “私の心はどうやって明かせるの?

  • Impossible to begin. Enough. No. Begin with the hapless dodo."

    始めることなど不可能 もう十分だ 不幸なドードーから始めなさい”

  • And I talk about the dodo, and how the dodo became extinct,

    なぜドードーが絶滅してしまったのか という内容で

  • and then I talk about Spinoza.

    次にスピノザについて話します

  • "As the last dodo was dying, Spinoza was looking for a rational explanation

    “最後のドードーが死んでしまう時 スピノザは

  • for everything, called eudaemonia.

    幸福主義の合理的な説明を探していた

  • And then he breathed his last, with loved ones around him,

    そして最愛の人たちに囲まれ息を引き取った

  • and I know that he had chicken soup also, as his last meal."

    彼が最後に食べたのはチキンスープ”

  • I happen to know it for a fact.

    これは本当です

  • And then he died, and there was no more Spinoza. Extinct.

    彼は亡くなり スピノザは死滅しました

  • And then, we don't have a stuffed Spinoza,

    スピノザの剥製はありませんが

  • but we do have a stuffed Pavlov's dog,

    パブロフの犬の剥製ならあります