Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hi I'm John Green, this is Crash Course Literature.

    こんにちは、ジョン・グリーンです。クラッシュ・コース文学です。

  • And today we'll continue our discussion of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, a

    そして今日は、ジェーン・オースティンの『高慢と偏見』の続きです。

  • book that reads like it was written by your funny and mean best friend, who also happens

    糞本

  • to be a brilliant novelist and a pretty interesting moral philosopher.

    優秀な小説家であり、かなり面白い道徳哲学者であること。

  • I mean, I love my best friend, but I REALLY

    親友を愛してるんだけど、私は本当に

  • wish Jane Austen was my best friend.

    ジェーン・オースティンが私の親友だったらいいのに

  • But let's face it, she wouldn't have been that into me.

    でも正直に言うと、彼女は私にそこまで興味を持っていなかっただろう。

  • Last time we talked about the political context of the novel, and how to choose between your

    前回は、小説の政治的な文脈と、あなたの

  • personal fulfillment and the good of your family.

    個人的な充実感と家族のために。

  • Today we'll look at whether it's an endorsement of materialism or a rejection of it.

    今日はそれが唯物論の支持なのか拒絶なのかを見ていきましょう。

  • We'll also consider the novel's politics--whether it's liberal or conservative in its outlook.

    小説の政治についても考えてみましょう リベラルなのか保守的なのか?

  • And we'll enjoy some sexy, sexy landscape description.

    セクシーな風景描写も楽しもう

  • But first let's consider the epistemological problems of the novel.

    しかし、まずは小説の認識論的問題を考えてみましょう。

  • Because here at Crash Course we know how to party.

    ここクラッシュコースでは、パーティーの仕方を知っているからです。

  • And also we just learned the meaning of the word epistemological.

    また、認識論的という言葉の意味を学んだところです。

  • Let's go.

    行くぞ

  • INTRO So, epistomology is the study of knowledge--it's

    イントロ つまり、エピストモロジーとは、知識の研究です。

  • knowing how we know, and what it means to know.

    知ることの意味を知ることで

  • And knowledge is a real problem in Pride and Prejudice--much of the plot hinges on what

    そして、知識は、『高慢と偏見』の本当の問題である - プロットの大部分は、何に依存しているかにかかっています。

  • people know and when they know it, and how they can be sure of knowledge.

    人は知っていて、知っているときにはどうやって知識を確認するのか。

  • Remember this is Regency England.

    ここはリージェンシー時代のイギリスだということを忘れないでください。

  • If you like someone you can't immediately Google them or snapchat them or, I have no idea what

    好きな人がいたら、すぐにググったり、スナップチャットしたりすることはできませんし、私は何も考えていません。

  • people do.

    人々はそうしています。

  • Compared to today's young people, I basically grew up in Regency England.

    今の若者に比べれば、私は基本的にイギリスのリージェンシー時代に育ちました。

  • At the beginning of the novel, Jane and Mr. Bingley meet, Jane has no way to let him

    小説の冒頭では、ジェーンとビングリー氏が出会い、ジェーンは彼を聞かせる方法がありません。

  • know that she likes him.

    彼女が彼を好きなのを知っている

  • She can't just swipe right, or left--I really, I don't know.

    彼女は右にも左にも スワイプできないんだ 本当に分からない

  • I don't know any of this stuff..

    こんなの知らないよ...。

  • I'm trying to sound young, and hip, and relatable, and I should just give up because

    私は若くてヒップで親近感を持てるようにしようとしていますが、私はあきらめるべきなのです。

  • I'm one year younger than Jane Austen was when she DIED.

    ジェーン・オースティンが死んだ時より1歳若かった

  • I'm sorry, what were we talking about?

    すみません、何の話をしていたんですか?

  • Right.

    そうだな

  • Jane has no way of discovering just how available he is.

    ジェーンは彼がどれだけ利用できるかを知る術がない。

  • Characters have to rely on gossip, subtle

    キャラクターはゴシップに頼らざるを得ない、微妙な

  • inquiries sometimes in the form of letters, and what they can see with their own eyes.

    時には手紙の形で問い合わせをしたり、自分の目で見てわかることをしたり。

  • But Austen is skeptical about whether or not you can trust the evidence of your own eyes.

    しかし、オースティンは、自分の目で見た証拠を信じていいのかどうか、懐疑的です。

  • When Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy see each other they hate each other.

    エリザベスとダーシーさんが会うと憎しみ合います。

  • And months go by before they learn enough

    何ヶ月も経つと、彼らは十分に学ぶ前に

  • about each other to readjust those initial impressions.

    最初の印象を再調整するために、お互いのことを考えてみましょう。

  • Mr. Darcy's pride flourishes because he doesn't know or understand the people around

    周りの人を知らないからこそ、ダーシーさんのプライドが高まる

  • him.

    彼のことだ

  • The same goes for Elizabeth's prejudice.

    エリザベスの偏見も同様です。

  • In addition to constantly reminding us how little we know about other people, Austen

    常に私たちが他の人について知っていることはほとんどないことを思い出させることに加えて、オースティンは

  • also questions how little we know of ourselves.

    また、私たちがどれだけ自分自身を知らないかを問うています。

  • Elizabeth is the character that most of us will identify with in this novel.

    エリザベスは、この小説ではほとんどの人が共感するであろうキャラクターです。

  • Austen wrote in a letter, “I think her as delightful a character as ever appeared in

    オースティンは手紙にこう書いています。

  • print, and how I shall be able to tolerate those who do not like her at least, I do not

    刷り込みをして、少なくとも彼女が嫌いな人をどうやって許容したらいいのか、私にはわかりません。

  • know.”

    知っている

  • But even clever Elizabeth has to admit that she has been mistaken in most of her beliefs,

    しかし、賢いエリザベスでさえ、自分の信念のほとんどが間違っていたことを認めざるを得ない。

  • particularly ones about herself.

    特に自分自身のことについて。

  • Once she learns the truth of the bad feelings

    悪い感情の真相を知った途端に

  • between Darcy and Wickham, she has to acknowledge her own prejudices and even says, “Till

    ダーシーとウィッカムの間では、彼女は自分の偏見を認めざるを得ず、さらには、「それまでは

  • this moment, I never knew myself.”

    "この瞬間、私は自分自身を知らなかった"

  • One of the most fascinating things Austen does in this book is to put the reader into

    オースティンがこの本の中で最も魅力的なことの一つは、読者をその中に入れることです。

  • the place of not knowing.

    知らないところでは

  • Take the scene in which Elizabeth watches Wickham, whom she likes, and Mr. Darcy, whom

    エリザベスが好きなウィッカムとダーシーを見ているシーンを撮る。

  • she hates, run into each other.

    彼女は嫌っていて ぶつかり合っている

  • At this point, she believes that Mr. Darcy

    この時点で彼女はダーシーさんが

  • has cheated Wickham of his inheritance, but when she sees them, she doesn't know what

    がウィッカムを騙して遺産を手に入れたが、それを見た彼女は何も知らず

  • to believe: “Elizabeth happening to see the countenance

    信じるために"顔を見たエリザベスは

  • of both as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting.

    互いの顔を見合わせたときの両者の表情は、その効果に驚くばかりだった。

  • Both changed colour, one looked white, the other red.

    どちらも色が変わり、片方は白っぽく、もう片方は赤っぽく見えました。

  • Mr. Wickham after a few moments, touched his hat -- a salutation which Mr. Darcy just deigned

  • to return.

    を返してください。

  • What could be the meaning of it?”

    何か意味があるのでしょうか?"

  • Not only do we not know why one turned white and one turned red, we don't even know who

    一人が白になって一人が赤になった理由がわからないだけでなく、誰が誰なのかもわからない。

  • turned which color.

    がどの色になったか。

  • Elizabeth presumably knows that, of course, but by calling attention to what we as readers

    エリザベスはおそらくそれを知っていますが、もちろん、しかし、私たちが読者として注意を喚起することによって

  • don't know, Austen is also reminding us of all that Elizabeth doesn't know--just

    オースティンはまた、エリザベスが知らないことを思い出させてくれている。

  • how often she has to wonder, What could be the meaning of it?.

    何か意味があるのだろうかと 疑問に思うことがあります

  • Speaking of meaning, Pride and Prejudice spends a lot of time examining the meaning of money.

    意味といえば、高慢と偏見はお金の意味を吟味することに多くの時間を費やします。

  • Austen lets us know how much everyone has, where it comes from, how much they stand to

    オースティンは、誰もがどれだけ持っているか、どこから来ているか、どれだけ立っているかを知ることができます。

  • inherit, and so on.

    を継承するなどしています。

  • Let's check everyone's accounts in the Thoughtbubble.

    思考バブルでみんなのアカウントをチェックしてみよう。

  • Mr. Bennet has 2,000 pounds per year, which just about puts him into the upper middle

    ベネット氏の年間体重は2,000ポンド(約1,000kg)ですから、中堅以上の体重になります。

  • class.

    クラスを使用しています。

  • But because his estate is entailed and will be inherited by the nearest male relative

    しかし、彼の財産は近親者である男性に相続されるため、彼の財産は、近親者である男性に相続されます。

  • when he and his wife die, his daughters will only have a share of what their mother brought

    お袋の取り分はお袋が持ってくる

  • into the marriage.

    結婚に向けて

  • Each daughter will get about forty pounds

    一人の娘が約40ポンドを取得します。

  • a year.

    一年。

  • It's hard to estimate how much this is in today's money; it could mean as little as

    これが今日のお金でいくらになるのか見積もるのは難しいです。

  • a few thousand dollars though, so definitely not enough to live comfortably.

    数千ドルとはいえ、快適に暮らすには十分ではありません。

  • Mr. Bingley has at least 5,000 pounds per year, which is very nice.

    ビングリーさんは最低でも年間50000ポンドは持っているとのことで、とてもいいですね。

  • But Darcy has at least double that every year from rents on his land.

    でも ダーシーは 自分の土地の家賃から毎年少なくともその2倍はもらっている

  • He might make even more on the interest from his investments, so it's safe to think of

    投資で得た利息でさらに儲かるかもしれないので、安心して

  • him as kind of a multimillionaire.

    彼は億万長者のようなものだ

  • His sister Georgiana has an inheritance of 30,000, so even assuming a conservative investment,

    妹のジョージアナには3万の相続財産があるので、保守的な投資を想定しても

  • she'll be fine.

    彼女は大丈夫だ

  • Wickham inherited 1,000 pounds from Mr. Darcy's father and then Mr. Darcy gave him 3,000 more

    ウィッカムはダーシー氏の父から1000ポンドを相続し、ダーシー氏はさらに3000ポンドを彼に与えました。

  • when Wickham decided to quit the clergy.

    ウィッカムが聖職者を辞めると決めた時に

  • But he spent it all, so he'll need to marry rich.

    でも全部使ったんだから、金持ちと結婚しないとダメだろうな。

  • Obviously Lydia isn't rich, but between paying his debts and buying his commission,

    明らかにリディアは金持ちではないが、借金の支払いと手数料の購入の間に

  • Mr. Darcy gives Wickham another 1,500 pounds.

    ダーシー氏はウィッカムに1500ポンドを渡す

  • Plus, he may even have given him 10,000 more in order to convince him to marry Lydia and

    さらに、彼はリディアと結婚するように彼を説得するために、彼に1万ドル以上を与えたかもしれません。

  • avoid scandal.

    スキャンダルを避ける

  • Thanks, Thoughtbubble.

    ありがとう、Thoughtbubble。

  • Whether the amount of money someone indicates moral worth?

    誰かの金額が道徳的価値を示すかどうか?

  • Which may seem like a answer question in 21 century investment banker America.

    これは21世紀の投資銀行家アメリカの答えの質問のように見えるかもしれません。

  • But in 19 century England things were a little different.

    しかし、19世紀のイギリスでは少し違っていました。

  • For instance, Darcy is certainly richer than Wickham, and morally superior.

    例えば、ダーシーはウィッカムよりも確かに金持ちで、道徳的にも優れている。

  • But in a couple of places the novel seems to make the point that money isn't everything.

    しかし、いくつかの場所で、この小説は、お金がすべてではないことをポイントにしているように見えます。

  • Mr. Darcy's aunt, Lady Catherine has plenty of money, but that doesn't stop her from

    ダーシーさんの叔母のキャサリン妃はお金をたくさん持っていますが、それは彼女を止めることはできません。

  • being portrayed as a killjoy and a snob.

    殺戮者と俗物として描かれています。

  • Austen satirizes her materialism, like the way Lady Catherine pays attention to how nice

    オースティンは彼女の唯物論を風刺し、キャサリン妃がどのように素敵な注意を払う方法のように

  • people's carriages are or how Mr. Collins fawns over Lady Catherine and her daughter

    人の馬車もコリンズ氏もキャサリン妃と娘を溺愛する

  • just because they're rich.

    金持ちだからといって

  • But Austen satirizes materialism in people

    しかし、オースティンは人々の中の唯物論を風刺しています。

  • who have less money, too, like Wickham with his debts.

    ウィッカムのように借金をして金を持っていない人もいる。

  • The book is also pretty hard on Lydia who can't afford to buy lunch for her sisters

    本はまた、彼女の姉妹のために昼食を購入する余裕がないリディアにかなりハードである

  • because she's spent all her money on a disgusting hat, saying, “Look here, I have bought this

    と言って、嫌な帽子にお金をかけてしまったからです。

  • bonnet.

    帽子。

  • I do not think it is very pretty; but I thought I might as well buy it as not.”

    あまりきれいとは思わないけど、買わないほうがいいかなと思って」。

  • Here, Austen seems to be suggesting that how

    ここで、オースティンは、どのように

  • you spend money probably matters as much or more than how much of it you have.

    お金を使うということは、どれだけ持っているかということと同じくらい、あるいはそれ以上に重要なのかもしれません。

  • Quick side note: The growing industrialization

    クイックサイドノート:成長する産業化

  • of England meant that more artifacts were available to the average person.

    イギリスでは、より多くの人工物が一般の人にも手に入ることを意味していました。

  • And when I say artifacts, I mean everything from, you know, pots and pans to clothing.

    人工物と言ったら、鍋やフライパンから衣類まで全部だ。

  • Even a generation or two before, the middle class had been vastly smaller, and there weren't

    一世代か二世代前でさえ、中産階級は大幅に減少していた。

  • as many, like, materials to be materialistic about.

    多くの、のような、物質的なものについての材料として

  • So almost all people, almost all of the time would have been buying lunch, rather than

    ということは、ほとんどの人が、ほとんどの人が、お弁当を買っていたであろう、というよりも

  • buying bonnets.

    ボンネットを買う。

  • Maybe, then money can actually chip away at personal happiness and moral character?

    お金は個人の幸せや道徳的な性格を 削ってしまうのでは?

  • Again, not exactly.

    繰り返しますが、正確ではありません。

  • Austen doesn't come out and say that you should marry for money, but the novel does

    オースティンは「金のために結婚しろ」とは言わないが、この小説では言わない。

  • seem to endorse the idea that the characters who acquire the most money will be the happiest.

    は、最も多くのお金を獲得したキャラクターが最も幸せになるという考えを支持しているようです。

  • Clearly Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy will live happily ever after and so will Jane and Mr.

    エリザベスとダーシーさんは幸せに暮らせるし、ジェーンとダーシーさんも幸せに暮らせる。

  • Bingley.

    ビングリー

  • Charlotte and Mr. Collins are only a little happy, because Mr. Collins is almost as horrible

    シャーロットとコリンズさんは、コリンズさんがほぼ同じくらいひどいので、少しだけ幸せになっています。

  • as Mary, but they'll probably be happier once Mr. Collins inherits.

    メアリーのようにね でもコリンズさんが相続した方が 幸せになれるかもね

  • And it doesn't seem like Lydia and Wickham, who have the least, won't be happy at all.

    そして、一番持っているリディアとウィッカムが幸せになることは全くなさそうだ。

  • They don't even like each other by the time the book ends.

    本が終わる頃にはお互いのことを好きになっているわけではありません。

  • And it's only Mr. Darcy's money that saved Lydia from total disgrace.

    ダーシーさんの金のおかげでリディアは恥をかかずに済んだ

  • And also, we need to remember how and why Elizabeth falls in love with Mr. Darcy.

    あと、エリザベスがダーシーさんと恋に落ちた経緯と理由も忘れてはいけません。

  • Part of it is the letter he sends and part of it has to do with how he rescues her sister,

    その一部は、彼が送った手紙であり、その一部は、彼が彼女の妹をどうやって救うかに関係しています。

  • but a lot of it has to do with his estate, Pemberley.

    彼の財産の多くは ペンバリーに関係している

  • When Elizabeth first sees Pemberley, we get a rare passage of description in the book:

    エリザベスが初めてペンバリーを見た時、本の中では珍しい描写の一節が出てきます。

  • It was a large, handsome, stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed

    "それは大きくてハンサムな石造りの建物で、立ち上がりの良い場所に立っていました。

  • by a ridge of high woody hills;—and in front, a stream of some natural importance was swelled

    前方には、自然の重要な小川が増水していました。

  • into greater, but without any artificial appearanceand at that moment she felt that to be mistress

    その瞬間、彼女は愛人であることを感じました。

  • of Pemberley might be something!”

    "ペンバリーの何かかもしれない!"

  • Now, obviously this is a stand-in for Mr. Darcy himself, who is also large and handsome

    これは明らかにダーシー氏の代役です彼もまた大柄でハンサムです

  • and not artificial.

    であり、人工的なものではありません。

  • But it's the revelation of his beautiful estate that really wins Elizabeth's heart,

    しかし、本当にエリザベスの心を掴んだのは、彼の美しい財産の啓示なのです。

  • which suggests that even Pemberley isn't just a metaphor for Darcy; Darcy is also a

    これは、ペンバリーでさえもダーシーの単なるメタファーではないことを示唆している。

  • metaphor for Pemberley.

    ペンバリーの比喩。

  • Now, it's easy to argue that this is a conservative book.

    さて、これが保守的な本だと主張するのは簡単です。

  • Everyone gets married in the end.

    結局みんな結婚するんだよね。

  • Elizabeth gets to be both happy and rich.

    エリザベスは幸せにもお金持ちにもなれる

  • Mr. Darcy, an authoritarian figure who holds power over a lot of people, turns out to be

    多くの人々に権力を握る権威主義者のダーシー氏は、次のように判明します。

  • the hero.

    英雄だ

  • And Wickham, the upstart who comes from the servant class, is the villain.

    そして、使用人階級から出てきた新進気鋭のウィッカムが悪役です。

  • So the established social hierarchy gets reaffirmed in terms of class, and also in terms of gender.

    そのため、確立された社会階層は、階級の面でも、またジェンダーの面でも再確認されることになります。

  • Elizabeth seemed so free-thinking and independent-minded, but her reward is to subjugate herself to

    エリザベスはとても自由な発想で独立心が強いように見えたが、彼女の報酬は自分自身を従属させることだ

  • the wealthy aristocrat who said that her looks were tolerable.

    容姿は許容範囲だと言っていた裕福な貴族。

  • On the other hand, you could argue that the book is a lot more radical than that.

    一方で、この本はもっと過激なものだと主張することもできるでしょう。

  • Yes, Mr. Darcy makes Elizabeth happy, but arguing for her own individual happiness is

    ダーシーさんはエリザベスを幸せにしてくれますが、彼女個人の幸せを主張するのは

  • really progressive stance.

    本当に進歩的なスタンス。

  • Like, when Lady Catherine tries to get Elizabeth to say that she will never marry Mr. Darcy,

    キャサリン妃がエリザベスに「ダーシーさんとは結婚しない」と言わせようとした時とか。

  • Elizabeth replies, “I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own

    エリザベスは答えます "私はただ、私自身の中で、そのような方法で行動することを決意しています。

  • opinion, constitute my happiness.''

    "これが私の幸福を構成している

  • My own opinion.

    私自身の意見です。

  • My happiness.

    私の幸せ。

  • Maybe that doesn't sound revolutionary, but it is.

    革命的とは言えないかもしれませんが。

  • This book was written in a time when individual happiness was not privileged over family status

    この本は、個人の幸せが家族の地位よりも優遇されていなかった時代に書かれたものです。

  • and security, And that was especially true for the individual

    そして、それは特に個人に当てはまることでした。

  • happiness of women.

    女性の幸せ

  • So Elizabeth saying that she would only act in a manner that would constitute her happiness

    エリザベスは自分の幸せを構成するような行動しかしないと言っていたのね

  • is a claiming of full personhood, with certain inalienable rights, including liberty

    は、自由を含むある種の不可侵の権利を持つ完全な人間性の主張である。

  • and the pursuit of happiness. She's saying not only that her opinion matters,

    幸せを追求することが大事だと言っているのです彼女は自分の意見だけが重要ではないと言っています。

  • but that she gets to make the final decisionin what she does independent of what

    しかし、彼女は何をするかの最終的な決定をすることができます。

  • her family wants for her, which was another radical idea for women in Regency England.

    彼女の家族が彼女のために望んでいることは、リージェンシー時代のイギリスの女性のためのもう一つの急進的なアイデアでした。

  • The novel also suggests that Elizabeth's vivacity will have a beneficial effect on

    小説では、エリザベスの快活さが

  • Mr. Darcy, hinting that it might be possible to work from within to change some of the

    ダーシー氏は、一部を変えるために内部から働きかけることができるかもしれないとほのめかしています。

  • older, more authoritarian systems.

    より古い、より権威主義的なシステム。

  • She's not wild or flighty or always buying terrible bonnets like Lydia, but she is independent-minded.

    リディアのように野性的で飛んでいるわけでもないし、いつもひどいボンネットを買っているわけでもないが、彼女は自立心が強い。

  • The fact that Mr. Darcy falls for her suggests that maybe he, and men like him, are capable

    ダーシー氏が彼女を好きになったということは彼や彼のような男にも可能性があるということを示唆している

  • of change.

    変化の

  • Now this would be a darker novel or a more radical one if it actually made Elizabeth

    これはもっと暗い小説か、もっと過激なものになるだろう。もし実際にエリザベスが

  • choose between happiness and financial security, instead of presenting all of thatand Pemberley,

    幸せと経済的安全のどちらかを選ぶのではなく、その全てを提示するのではなく、ペンバリーを選んでください。

  • toocourtesy of Mr. Darcy.

    ダーシーさんのご好意で

  • But it is no sin for a book to have a happy ending, and Pride and Prejudice is still a

    しかし、それはハッピーエンドを持っている本のための罪ではありません、プライドと偏見はまだ

  • vindication of Elizabeth's character and temperament and it makes a really persuasive

    エリザベスの性格と気質を証明するものであり、それは本当に説得力があります。

  • argument for personal happiness as a moral category worth celebrating.

    祝うに値する道徳的なカテゴリーとしての個人的な幸福のための議論。

  • So go forth and pursue some happiness yourself.

    だから、自分自身で幸せを追求しに行きましょう。

  • And thanks for watching.

    見てくれてありがとう

Hi I'm John Green, this is Crash Course Literature.

こんにちは、ジョン・グリーンです。クラッシュ・コース文学です。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

B1 中級 日本語 ダーシー エリザベス ウィッカム オースティン 幸せ 小説

自由主義者、保守主義者、高慢と偏見 第2部:クラッシュコース文学 412

  • 2272 258
    黃齡萱   に公開 2018 年 02 月 14 日
重要英単語

前のバージョンに戻す