Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hi I'm John Green, this is Crash Course Literature and it is a truth universally acknowledged

    こんにちは、ジョン・グリーンです。これはクラッシュコースの文学であり、それは普遍的に認められている真実です。

  • that a video series about world literature must be in want of a Jane Austen episode.

    世界文学に関するビデオシリーズは、ジェーン・オースティンのエピソードが欲しいと思っているに違いないことを。

  • So here it is.

    だから、ここにある。

  • Today, we'll be discussing Pride and Prejudice, Austen's Regency-era novel of life, liberty

    今日は、オースティンのリージェンシー時代の小説「高慢と偏見」について、「人生、自由

  • and bonnets.

    とボンネット。

  • The book was first published in 1813, it's a social satire about a family with five daughters

    1813年に出版されたこの本は、5人の娘を持つ一家を描いた社会風刺です。

  • and quite a lot of economic anxiety.

    とかなりの経済的不安を抱えています。

  • And the novel's characters and themes have remained relevant for centuries now--which

    そして、小説の登場人物やテーマは何世紀にもわたって関連性を持ち続けています。

  • is why there are SO.

    がある理由です。

  • MANY. adaptations of it, from the Keira Knightly movie to an Emmy winning web series co-created

    キーラ・ナイトリーの映画からエミー賞を受賞したウェブシリーズまで、たくさんの作品があります。

  • by my brother.

    弟が

  • Today, we'll talk about the social and historical context in which the book was written

    今日は、この本が書かれた社会的・歴史的背景について

  • , the style that Jane Austen helped invent, and

    ジェーン・オースティンが発明したスタイルと

  • the dilemmas the major characters face.

    主要登場人物が直面するジレンマ。

  • And in the next episode, we'll look more closely at the politics of the book and its

    そして次回は、この本の政治をより詳しく見ていき、その

  • attitudes toward money, class and gender.

    お金、階級、ジェンダーに対する態度。

  • But for now: It's bonnets all the way down.

    でも今のところはボンネットの下にあるのは、ずっとボンネットだ。

  • INTRO So we don't know that much about Jane Austen's

    イントロ 私たちはジェーン・オースティンのことを あまり知らないのですね

  • life because after her death her sister burned most of her letters.

    彼女の死後、彼女の妹は彼女の手紙のほとんどを燃やしてしまったからです。

  • Just a friendly note, by the way, to any future literary executors out there, maybe don't

    友好的なメモだが 未来の文学界の幹部には-

  • burn so much stuff?

    そんなに燃やすの?

  • Even if you're told to.

    と言われても

  • Wait, unless your MY literary executor.

    待って、あなたの文学的な執行人でなければ。

  • Then burn everything.

    ならば全てを燃やしてしまえ

  • But, here's what we do know: Jane Austen was born in 1775 to an Anglican clergyman

    でも分かっていることがありますジェーン・オースティンは1775年に聖職者の間に生まれた

  • and his wife; Jane was the second youngest of eight children.

    ジェーンは8人の子供の2番目の末っ子でした。

  • And her father farmed and took in students to makes ends meet.

    彼女の父親は農業をしていて、学生を引き取って生活費を稼いでいました。

  • Jane was mostly taught at home and sometimes she wasn't taught at all, although she and

    ジェーンはほとんど家で教えてもらっていましたが、全く教えてもらえないこともありました。

  • her sister did go to a year or two of boarding school.

    姉は1、2年全寮制の学校に行っていました。

  • When she was eleven, Jane started writing plays and novels, mostly social satires and

    11歳の時、ジェーンは演劇や小説を書き始めました。

  • parodies ofnovels of sensibility,” a literary genre in which women like, cry and

    女性が好きで泣く文学ジャンル「感性小説」のパロディ

  • sigh and faint a lot.

    ため息をついて、気絶することが多い。

  • Many of these early works were in the style of the epistolary novel, which is a story

    これらの初期の作品の多くは、エピストル小説のスタイルをとっていた。

  • composed of letters, and we see echoes of that form in Pride and Prejudice.

    文字で構成されており、『高慢と偏見』ではその形のエコーを見ることができます。

  • We also see some echoes of Pride and Prejudice in Austen's life.

    また、オースティンの人生の中にも『高慢と偏見』の反響が見られます。

  • She never married, but she did receive at least one proposal that she accepted for a

    彼女は結婚したことはありませんでしたが、少なくとも1回はプロポーズを受け、それを受け入れたことはありました。

  • few hours.

    数時間。

  • And after her father's death in 1805, her financial position and the positions of her

    そして1805年の父の死後、彼女の経済的な地位や

  • mother and her sister became increasingly insecure.

    母親と妹はますます不安になっていった。

  • By 1816, four of her books had been published.

    1816年までに、彼女の本は4冊出版されていた。

  • And she was working on a new novel, called Sanditon, when she died in 1817, at the age

    彼女は新しい小説「サンディトン」を書いていた 1817年に死去した

  • of just 41.

    わずか41人の。

  • Two more of her works, Persuasion and Northanger

    説得」と「ノーザンガー」の2つの作品を追加しました。

  • Abbey, were published after her death.

    アビーは彼女の死後に出版されました。

  • They're all good--but to me at least Pride and Prejudice is the most perfect of them--there's

    彼らはすべて良いです - しかし、私にとって少なくとも高慢と偏見は、それらの中で最も完璧なものです - そこにある。

  • a precision to it.

    それに合わせた精度を持っています。

  • Like Gatsby or Sula, Pride and Prejudice is a novel in which every single word feels genuinely

    ギャツビーやスーラのように、「高慢と偏見」は、言葉の一つ一つが純粋に感じられる小説です。

  • essential.

    欠かせない。

  • So what happens in Pride and Prejudice?

    では、『高慢と偏見』ではどうなるのか?

  • well, let's go to the Thoughtbubble: Mr. and Mrs. Bennet live in rural England

    では、思考回路を見に行きましょう。ベネット夫妻はイギリスの田舎に住んでいます。

  • with their five daughters: pretty Jane, lively Elizabeth, horrible Mary, airhead Kitty, and

    可愛いジェーン、生き生きとしたエリザベス、恐ろしいメアリー、気まぐれなキティ、そして5人の娘たちと。

  • boy obsessed Lydia.

    リディアに取り憑かれた少年

  • When Mr. Bennet dies the estate will go to a male cousin, so the daughters have to find

    ベネットさんが亡くなると財産はいとこの男性に渡るので、娘たちはいとこを見つけなければなりません。

  • rich husbands.

    金持ちの夫

  • Or else.

    それとも他にも

  • Or else live in poverty or become governesses, and if you've read Jane Eyre, you know how

    貧困の中で生きるか 家庭教師になるか ジェーン・エアーを読んだことがあるなら どうするか知ってるだろう

  • great that gig is.

    そのギグは素晴らしい

  • Mr. Bingley, an eligible bachelor, arrives on the scene, and he and Jane fall in love.

    独身の資格を持ったビングリー氏が現れ、彼とジェーンは恋に落ちる。

  • Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy, Mr. Bingley's best friend, definitely don't.

    エリザベスとビングリーさんの親友のダーシーさんは絶対にいない。

  • In fact, Elizabeth sorts of hate him.

    実際、エリザベスは彼を憎んでいる。

  • Elizabeth gets a proposal of marriage from Mr. Collins, the cousin who's going to inherit

    エリザベスは相続することになったいとこのコリンズ氏から結婚の提案を受ける。

  • the estate.

    遺産のことだ

  • And marrying him would save her sisters from poverty, but Mr. Collins is awful and Elizabeth

    彼と結婚すれば姉妹は救われますが コリンズ氏はひどくてエリザベスは...

  • declines.

    衰退します。

  • So her best friend, Charlotte, ends up snagging him.

    親友のシャーロットは 彼を捕まえてしまう

  • Meanwhile, Elizabeth starts to fall for Wickham, a soldier in the militia.

    一方、エリザベスは民兵の兵士ウィッカムに恋心を抱き始める。

  • He hates Mr. Darcy, too.

    彼もダーシーさんを嫌っています。

  • Suddenly Mr. Bingley moves away and Jane is heartbroken.

    突然ビングリーさんが離れていき、ジェーンは心を痛めます。

  • Elizabeth goes to visit Charlotte and is introduced to Lady Catherine, Mr. Darcy's ultra-snob

    エリザベスはシャーロットを訪ね、ダーシー氏の超俗物のキャサリン夫人を紹介される。

  • aunt.

    おばさん

  • She sees Mr. Darcy there and he also proposes marriage but in a very insulting way.

    彼女はそこにダーシー氏を見て、彼もまた結婚を提案しますが、非常に侮辱的な方法で。

  • She insults him right back.

    彼女はすぐに彼を侮辱した

  • But some months later, Elizabeth is on a trip with her aunt and uncle.

    しかし、数ヶ月後、エリザベスは叔母と叔父と一緒に旅行に出かけることになる。

  • They visit Mr. Darcy's lavish estate and Elizabeth softens toward him.

    ダーシー氏の豪邸を訪れた二人は、エリザベスの方が彼に優しくなる。

  • Then she gets word that Lydia has run off with Wickham.

    リディアがウィッカムと逃げたと聞いて

  • Mr. Darcy saves Lydia's reputation by brokering

    ダーシーさんはリディアの評判を救う

  • a marriage.

    結婚だ

  • Then it's happy endings all around: Lydia gets married; Jane and Mr. Bingley get

    ハッピーエンドよリディアは結婚し、ジェーンとビングリー氏は

  • married, Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy get married, Kitty learns to be a little bit less of an

    結婚して、エリザベスとダーシーさんが結婚して、キティは少しだけ

  • airhead and Mary is presumably still horrible.

    エアヘッドとメアリーは推定的にまだ恐ろしいです。

  • Thanks, Thought Bubble.

    ありがとう、思考の泡。

  • So let's talk life and letters in Regency England.

    ということで、リージェンシー期のイギリスでの生活や手紙の話をしましょう。

  • By the way, Regency England refers to a period from about 1800-1820 when King George III

    ちなみにリージェンシー・イングランドとは、1800年~1820年頃のキングジョージ3世の時代を指します。

  • became mentally ill and unfit to rule.

    精神的に病んでしまい、支配することができなくなってしまった。

  • In England, this was a time of political uncertainty and a lot of economic volatility.

    イギリスでは、政治的な不安と経済的な変動が激しい時期でした。

  • There was a rising middle class, a burgeoning consumer culture, and a move from an agrarian

    中産階級の台頭、消費文化の急成長、農耕民族からの移行などがありました。

  • economy to an industrial one.

    経済から工業化へ。

  • And that meant less overall poverty, but it also meant a lot of social instability.

    それは全体的な貧困を減らすことを意味しますが、それは多くの社会的な不安定さを意味します。

  • And It was also a time when people in England were beginning to talk about the rights of

    また、イギリスの人々が権利について語り始めた時期でもあった。

  • women.

    女性の方。

  • Like, Mary Wollstonecraft publishedVindication of the Rights of Womenseven years after

    例えば、メアリー・ウォルストンクラフトが「女性の権利の正当化」を発表したのは、その7年後のことでした。

  • Austen was born, though it's important to remember that at this place and time women

    オースティンは生まれましたが、この場所と時代には女性が生まれていたことを忘れてはいけません。

  • didn't really have many rights--they couldn't vote, and in Pride and Prejudice, the whole

    選挙権がなかったし、『高慢と偏見』の中では

  • plot begins because all of Bennet's five children are daughters,

    ベネットの5人の子供が全員娘であることからプロットが始まる。

  • This means that legally, Bennet's estate has to go to a male cousin.

    つまり、法的にはベネットの財産はいとこの男性に渡ることになる。

  • But there was a growing belief that hey, maybe women should have rights.

    しかし、女性には権利があるべきだという考えが広まっていました。

  • Abroad, the American Revolution and the French Revolution had recently unsettled established

    海外では、アメリカ革命とフランス革命は、最近確立された

  • social and political orders.

    社会秩序と政治秩序。

  • Everywhere there were increasing discussions about rights and responsibilities, liberties

    どこでも権利と責任、自由についての議論が増えていました。

  • and duties.

    と職務。

  • You can even hear this in the famous first sentence of Pride and Prejudice: “It is

    高慢と偏見」の有名な冒頭の一文にもこの言葉が出てきますね。"それは

  • a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be

    一人の男は一財産を持っていなければならない

  • in want of a wife.”

    "妻がいない"

  • It has an echo of the American Declaration of Independence: “We find these truths to

    アメリカの独立宣言の響きがあります。"我々はこれらの真実を見つけるために

  • be self-evident…”

    決まっている

  • But the comic deflation in the second half of the sentence is pure Austen.

    しかし、文の後半のコミカルなデフレは純粋にオースティンです。

  • Some people are initially put off by Pride and Prejudice because they view it as a sort

    一部の人々は、彼らはそれが一種のようなものとして表示されるため、最初は高慢と偏見によって消極的にされています。

  • of literaryfied romance novel.

    文学的な恋愛小説の

  • And, it is a book primarily interested in human relationships, especially romantic ones--but

    そして、それは主に人間関係、特にロマンチックなものに興味を持っている本です。

  • I'd challenge the idea that such novels can't be great.

    こういう小説は偉大なものではないという考えに挑戦してみたいと思います。

  • Nobody ever argues that picaresque novels,

    ピカレスク小説に異論を唱える人はいない。

  • or bildungsromans, are merely genre novels--even though they are also genres.

    やビルドゥングスロマンは、ジャンル小説に過ぎない--ジャンルであるにもかかわらず。

  • But the wordromanceis too often and too quickly dismissed.

    しかし、「恋愛」という言葉はあまりにも頻繁に、そしてあまりにもすぐに却下されてしまいます。

  • By the way, Austen has this completely unearned reputation for being genteel and conservative.

    ところで、オースティンは、このように全く不釣り合いなほどに上品で保守的であるという評価を受けています。

  • The reality is that her work is very funny and mean and super smart about human behavior.

    彼女の作品は、人間の行動について、とても面白くて意地悪で超頭がいいというのが現実です。

  • You can hear that in the letters that survive,

    生き残った手紙にも聞こえてきます。

  • like when she writes to her sister, “I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it

    彼女は彼女の妹に書いたときのように "私は人々がそれがあるように、非常に好意的であることを望んでいない

  • saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”

    "好きになる手間が省ける"

  • But also while this book involves lower-case r romance, it is very aggressively not capital-r

    しかし、また、この本は小文字のrのロマンスを含むが、それは非常に積極的に大文字のrではありません。

  • Romantic, in the Byron Wordsworth Shelley sense that feelings are so overwhelming that

    ロマンチックな、バイロンワーズワースシェリーの感覚では、感情はそのように圧倒されていることを

  • they supersede logic.

    彼らは論理よりも優先されます。

  • I mean, Wordsworth can write a hillside for thirty-seven stanzas, but if you read Austen

    ワーズワースは三十七節で丘を書けるけど、オースティンを読めば

  • closely, you'll find that there's a striking absence of physical description.

    よく見ると、物理的な描写がないことに気づくでしょう。

  • We don't know what the dresses look like.

    ドレスがどのようなものかはわかりません。

  • We don't know what the people look like.

    人がどんな顔をしているのかはわかりません。

  • When there is a physical description, like the description of Mr. Darcy's estate or

    ダーシー氏の財産の記述のように物理的な記述がある場合や

  • Elizabeth's petticoat, it means that something really important is happening.

    エリザベスのペチコート、それは何か本当に重要なことが起きていることを意味しています。

  • And even then these descriptions are very brief.

    そして、その時でさえ、これらの記述は非常に簡潔です。

  • If we're being honest, there isn't even all that much in here about bonnets.

    正直に言うと、ここにはボンネットのことはあまり書かれていません。

  • In fact, Austen is suspicious of overwhelming emotion.

    実際、オースティンは圧倒的な感情を疑っている。

  • Remember how I mentioned the novel of sensibility and Austen's early satires?

    感性の小説とオースティンの初期の風刺画の話をしたのを覚えていますか?

  • She's skeptical of feeling too much, of getting so carried away by emotion that it

    彼女は感情を感じすぎることに懐疑的で、感情に夢中になることに懐疑的です。

  • prevents you from thinking clearly.

    は、あなたが明確に考えることを妨げます。

  • This is exemplified by Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy's relationship.

    これは、エリザベスとダーシー氏の関係に例示されています。

  • They don't fall in love at first sight.

    一目惚れはしない。

  • Actually, it's the opposite.

    実は逆なんです。

  • At a ball, she overhears him telling his friend that her sister is the only hot girl in the

    舞踏会で、彼女は彼が彼の友人に彼女の妹が唯一のホットな女の子であることを話しているのを耳にした。

  • room and that Elizabeth is merelytolerable.”

    エリザベスは "大目に見てくれる "と言った

  • Given that Elizabeth and Darcy are end up together, this is a novel that's suspicious

    エリザベスとダーシーが一緒に終わることを考えると、これは怪しい小説です。

  • of romantic love, especially romantic love based on instant physical attraction

    惚れ惚れ

  • and when characters do get carried away by their emotions, they're either fooling themselves,

    登場人物が感情移入してしまうと、自分を騙しているか、自分自身を騙しているかのどちらかになってしまいます。

  • like Mr. Collins, or doing something really wrong, like Lydia.

    コリンズさんのように、あるいはリディアのように、本当に悪いことをしている。

  • Pride and Prejudice does have a wish-fulfilling ending.

    高慢と偏見には願いが叶う結末があります。

  • but it's still a sly, and ironic and clear-eyed exploration

    とはいえ、皮肉を込めて、ずるずると明晰な目で探っていく

  • of the individual vs. the collective, happiness vs. security

    集団対個人、幸福対安全保障

  • It's about love, but rather than presuming

    それは愛についてのことですが、仮定の話ではなく

  • that love is only a feeling, Pride and Prejudice explores how thinking and feeling and need

    愛はただの感情であることを、高慢と偏見は、どのように思考と感情と必要性を探る

  • and responsibility intersect to form the experience that we call love.

    と責任が交錯し、愛と呼ばれる経験を形成しています。

  • One might even say that it's a novel about romantic

    恋愛小説と言ってもいいかもしれません。

  • love that deconstructs our idea about romantic love.

    恋愛に対する考え方を脱構築してくれる恋。

  • Austen joked that the scope of her works was narrow, equating her writing with a two-inch

    オースティンは、自分の作品の範囲は狭いと冗談を言って、自分の文章を2インチの大きさのものに例えています。

  • piece of ivoryon which I work with so fine a brush, as produces little effect after

    磨いた象牙の破片

  • much labour.”

    徒労に終わる

  • She also critiqued of Pride and Prejudice, writing to a friend, “The work is rather

    また、彼女は『高慢と偏見』について、友人に「この作品はどちらかというと

  • too light & bright & sparkling; it wants shade.”

    明るすぎて、明るくて、キラキラしていて、日陰を欲している。

  • and yeah, OK, the novel is fun.

    と、うん、OK、小説は楽しい。

  • But reading should be fun sometimes.

    でも、読書はたまには楽しくないとね。

  • I mean, we already read To the Lighthouse.

    というか、すでに「灯台へ」を読んでいます。

  • And in terms of the prose-style itself, Austen was actually pioneering a new style here called

    散文のスタイルそのものという意味では、オースティンは実はここで新しいスタイルを開拓していました。

  • free indirect discourse.

    自由な間接言説。

  • It means that even though the narration is in the third person, the narrative voice takes

    語りが三人称であるにもかかわらず、語り手の声が

  • on the thoughts and feelings of characters.

    登場人物の思考や感情について

  • Like after unexpectedly meeting Darcy at

    ダーシーと不意に会った後のように

  • his estate, the third-person narration captures Elizabeth's embarrassment:

    彼の財産は、三人称のナレーションでエリザベスの恥ずかしさを捉えています。

  • Her coming there was the most unfortunate, the most ill-judged thing in the world!

    "彼女がそこに来たのは 世界で最も不幸で 判断力のないことだった!

  • How strange must it appear to him!

    彼には何と奇妙に見えることでしょう。

  • In what a disgraceful light might it not strike so vain a man!

    何と不名誉なことか...それは見栄っ張りな男を襲うのではないか!

  • It might seem as if she had purposely thrown herself in his way again!”

    "また彼の邪魔をするためにわざと身を投げたように見えるかもしれない!"

  • This narrative approach reflects emotion without stating it--showing instead of telling, as

    この物語的アプローチは、感情を表現することなく、感情を反映しています。

  • the saying goes--and makes us feel not as if we can sympathize with Elizabeth, but instead

    諺にもあるように、私たちはエリザベスに共感できるかどうかではなく、その代わりに

  • as if we ARE Elizabeth,

    まるで私たちがエリザベスであるかのように

  • and to me is one of the most profound and important things a novel can do: Great books

    私にとっては、小説ができることの中で最も奥深く、重要なことの一つです。偉大な本

  • offer you a way out of yourself, and into other peoples' lives.

    自分自身から抜け出して、他の人の生活の中への道を提供してくれます。

  • Next time we'll look more closely at some of the themes, but for now, let's briefly

    次回は、いくつかのテーマについて詳しく見ていきますが、とりあえず、簡単に

  • explore the dilemma facing Elizabeth Bennet and her sisters.

    エリザベス・ベネットとその姉妹が直面するジレンマを探る。

  • Because her parents have been bad with money, she knows she has to marry well or face poverty.

    親の金の使い方が悪いから、うまく結婚しないと貧乏になることを知っている。

  • So when Mr. Collins proposes, that's a fantastic solution.

    だからコリンズさんが提案すると、それは素晴らしい解決策なんです。

  • Except for one thing: She doesn't respect him.

    彼女は彼を尊敬していない

  • Mr. Collins is pompous and foolish and the very things that make Elizabeth terrific

    コリンズさんは尊大で愚かで、エリザベスを素晴らしいものにしている。

  • her lively mind and her fresh witmake him nervous.

    彼女の生き生きとした心と機転が彼を神経質にさせた。

  • She tells him, “ You could not make me happy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman

    あなたは私を幸せにすることができなかった、私は私が最後の女性だと確信している "と彼女は彼に告げる

  • in the world who would make you so.”

    "お前をそうさせるような奴はこの世にいない"

  • But the idea that happiness should be privileged over security is pretty radical.

    しかし、幸せは安全よりも特権であるべきだという考えはかなり過激です。

  • Elizabeth is deciding that her personal individual

    エリザベスは自分の個人的な個性を

  • happiness should outweigh the economic problems of her family.

    幸せは彼女の家族の経済的な問題を上回るはずです。

  • She is taking a huge risk when she rejects him.

    彼女は彼を拒絶することで、大きなリスクを背負っている。

  • As Mr. Collins tells her, she's poor so

    コリンズさんが言うように、彼女は貧乏なので

  • she probably won't get another proposal.

    もうプロポーズはないんじゃないかな?

  • He might not have made her happy, but he would have made her and her unmarried sisters financially

    彼は彼女を幸せにはしなかったかもしれないが、彼は彼女と未婚の姉妹を経済的に幸せにしていただろう。

  • secure.

    確保します。

  • And then, Elizabeth takes the same risk or a greater one when she rejects Mr. Darcy's

    そして、エリザベスはダーシー氏を拒絶したときに、同じリスク、あるいはそれ以上のリスクを背負うことになります。

  • insulting first proposal.

    侮辱的な最初の提案

  • She can't make herself marry a man she doesn't like.

    彼女は自分が嫌いな男と結婚させることができない。

  • This was the same dilemma Austen herself faced and her rejection of a suitor made things

    これは、オースティン自身が直面しているのと同じジレンマであり、彼女は求婚者の拒絶が物事を作った

  • hard for herself and for her family.

    自分のためにも家族のためにも

  • But she did it anyway.

    でも、彼女はとにかくやってしまった。

  • Now, thanks to the fairy tale ending, Elizabeth doesn't experience, like, catastrophic consequences

    おとぎ話の結末のおかげで、エリザベスは破滅的な結末を経験していない。

  • as a result of her privileging happiness.

    彼女の特権的な幸せの結果として

  • But as 19th century English readers would

    しかし、19世紀のイギリスの読者には

  • have been very well aware, she could have.

    彼女はよく知っていたかもしれない

  • And so, the novel helped them, and also helps us, explore when we should put our own needs

    そして、小説は彼らを助け、また、私たちを助け、私たち自身のニーズを置くべきときに探索することができます。

  • first, and when the happiness and security of others is more important.

    まず、他人の幸せや安心感の方が大事なとき。

  • Is doing what is best for you always the right

    あなたにとって最善のことをすることが常に正しいことなのでしょうか?

  • thing to do?

    用事

  • Or are there moments when you must sacrifice your happiness for the good of your family

    それとも家族のために幸せを犠牲にしなければならない時があるのでしょうか?

  • or your social order?

    それともあなたの社会秩序?

  • or even yourself? next time we'll discuss whether the politics

    それとも自分自身か? 次回は政治がどうかを議論します

  • of the book are radical or conservative.

    の本は過激派か保守派か。

  • And we'll answer a vexing question: Why does Lydia buy such an ugly bonnet?

    そして、悩ましい疑問にも答えよう。なぜリディアはそんな醜いボンネットを買うのか?

  • Thanks for watching.

    ご覧いただきありがとうございます。

  • Hope it was tolerable.

    大目に見てもらえるといいのですが

  • I'll see you next time.

    また次の機会にお会いしましょう。

Hi I'm John Green, this is Crash Course Literature and it is a truth universally acknowledged

こんにちは、ジョン・グリーンです。これはクラッシュコースの文学であり、それは普遍的に認められている真実です。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 CrashCourse エリザベス オースティン ダーシー 小説 ジェーン

高慢と偏見 その1クラッシュコースの文学 #411

  • 4980 293
    黃齡萱 に公開 2018 年 02 月 10 日
動画の中の単語