Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I'd like to invite you to close your eyes.

    翻訳: Kazunori Akashi 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

  • Imagine yourself standing

    みなさん 目を閉じて

  • outside the front door of your home.

    自分の家の

  • I'd like you to notice the color of the door,

    玄関前に立っていると想像してください

  • the material that it's made out of.

    ドアの色や

  • Now visualize a pack of overweight nudists on bicycles.

    素材をよく確かめて

  • They are competing in a naked bicycle race,

    次に思い浮かべるのは 自転車に乗った 太ったヌーディストです

  • and they are headed straight for your front door.

    みんな全裸でレース中です

  • I need you to actually see this.

    あなたの玄関に突進してきます

  • They are pedaling really hard, they're sweaty,

    その映像を思い浮かべてください

  • they're bouncing around a lot.

    懸命にペダルをこいで 汗だらけで

  • And they crash straight into the front door of your home.

    あっちこちにぶつかり

  • Bicycles fly everywhere, wheels roll past you,

    そのまま玄関に突っ込み

  • spokes end up in awkward places.

    自転車が宙を舞い タイヤがあなたをかすめ

  • Step over the threshold of your door

    スポークがヘンなところに着地

  • into your foyer, your hallway, whatever's on the other side,

    ドアに入りましょう

  • and appreciate the quality of the light.

    広間でしょうか ホールでしょうか とにかく入って

  • The light is shining down on Cookie Monster.

    差し込む光を よく見ましょう

  • Cookie Monster is waving at you

    光は クッキーモンスターを照らしています

  • from his perch on top of a tan horse.

    クッキーモンスターは 黄褐色の ―

  • It's a talking horse.

    しゃべる馬にまたがり

  • You can practically feel his blue fur tickling your nose.

    あなたに手を振っています

  • You can smell the oatmeal raisin cookie that he's about to shovel into his mouth.

    青い毛が鼻をくすぐるのを 実際に感じます

  • Walk past him. Walk past him into your living room.

    彼が口に放り込もうとしている オートミールレーズン・クッキーの匂いがします

  • In your living room, in full imaginative broadband,

    横を通って リビングへ行きましょう

  • picture Britney Spears.

    ここでは 目いっぱい想像力を使って

  • She is scantily clad, she's dancing on your coffee table,

    ブリトニー・スピアーズを 思い浮かべてください

  • and she's singing "Hit Me Baby One More Time."

    大胆な露出で テーブルの上で踊りながら

  • And then follow me into your kitchen.

    『ベイビー・ワン・モア・タイム』を 歌っています

  • In your kitchen, the floor has been paved over with a yellow brick road

    次はキッチンです

  • and out of your oven are coming towards you

    床は黄色いレンガの道になっていて

  • Dorothy, the Tin Man,

    オーブンから『オズの魔法使い』の

  • the Scarecrow and the Lion from "The Wizard of Oz,"

    ドロシーと ブリキ男と

  • hand-in-hand skipping straight towards you.

    かかしと ライオンが出てきます

  • Okay. Open your eyes.

    手をつないでスキップしながら まっすぐ向ってきます

  • I want to tell you about a very bizarre contest

    さあ 目を開いて

  • that is held every spring in New York City.

    これからお話しするのは 毎年ニューヨークで開かれる

  • It's called the United States Memory Championship.

    風変りな競技会についてです

  • And I had gone to cover this contest a few years back

    全米記憶選手権といいます

  • as a science journalist

    数年前 科学ライターとして この競技会を取材しました

  • expecting, I guess, that this was going to be

    私はサヴァン症候群患者の

  • like the Superbowl of savants.

    スーパーボウルみたいなものを

  • This was a bunch of guys and a few ladies,

    期待していました

  • widely varying in both age and hygienic upkeep.

    でも実際は 男だらけで 女性数名 ―

  • (Laughter)

    年齢も清潔さも まちまちな集まりでした

  • They were memorizing hundreds of random numbers,

    (笑)

  • looking at them just once.

    参加者は たった一度見ただけで 数百個のランダムな

  • They were memorizing the names of dozens and dozens and dozens of strangers.

    数字を記憶し

  • They were memorizing entire poems in just a few minutes.

    ものすごい数の 初対面の人の名前を覚え

  • They were competing to see who could memorize

    わずか数分で 詩を丸ごと暗記し

  • the order of a shuffled pack of playing cards the fastest.

    シャッフルしたカードの順番を

  • I was like, this is unbelievable.

    記憶する速さを競うのです

  • These people must be freaks of nature.

    信じられませんでした

  • And I started talking to a few of the competitors.

    彼らは自然が生んだ怪物に違いない

  • This is a guy called Ed Cook

    そこで参加者に話を聞きました

  • who had come over from England

    彼はエド・クック

  • where he had one of the best trained memories.

    イングランドでも最高の

  • And I said to him, "Ed, when did you realize

    記憶力の持ち主です

  • that you were a savant?"

    彼に こうたずねました 「エド 自分がサヴァンだと

  • And Ed was like, "I'm not a savant.

    気付いたのは いつ?」

  • In fact, I have just an average memory.

    するとエドは こう言いました 「僕はサヴァンじゃない

  • Everybody who competes in this contest

    記憶力は普通だよ

  • will tell you that they have just an average memory.

    競技会の参加者は みんな

  • We've all trained ourselves

    記憶力は人並みだって言うはずだよ

  • to perform these utterly miraculous feats of memory

    みんな訓練を積んで

  • using a set of ancient techniques,

    驚異的な記憶の離れ業をやっているのさ

  • techniques invented 2,500 years ago in Greece,

    ギリシャで2500年前に

  • the same techniques that Cicero had used

    発明された 古代のテクニックを使うんだ

  • to memorize his speeches,

    キケロが演説を覚え

  • that medieval scholars had used to memorize entire books."

    中世の学者たちが

  • And I was like, "Whoa. How come I never heard of this before?"

    本を丸ごと暗記するために 使ったのと同じテクニックだよ」

  • And we were standing outside the competition hall,

    僕の反応は 「なんで今まで知らなかったんだろう?」

  • and Ed, who is a wonderful, brilliant,

    僕たちは競技会場の外にいました

  • but somewhat eccentric English guy,

    エドはすごく優秀だけど

  • says to me, "Josh, you're an American journalist.

    少し変わったイングランド人です

  • Do you know Britney Spears?"

    彼が言うのです 「君はアメリカのジャーナリストだろう

  • I'm like, "What? No. Why?"

    ブリトニー・スピアーズは知り合いかい?」

  • "Because I really want to teach Britney Spears

    「何? ― いいや どうして?」

  • how to memorize the order of a shuffled pack of playing cards

    「ブリトニーに シャッフルしたカードの順番を

  • on U.S. national television.

    記憶する方法を教えたいんだ

  • It will prove to the world that anybody can do this."

    それもアメリカのテレビでね

  • (Laughter)

    ブリトニーにできるなら 誰でもできるという証明になる」

  • I was like, "Well I'm not Britney Spears,

    (笑)

  • but maybe you could teach me.

    だから僕は言いました 「ブリトニーじゃないけど

  • I mean, you've got to start somewhere, right?"

    僕に教えてみないか

  • And that was the beginning of a very strange journey for me.

    まず始めてみるべきだろう?」

  • I ended up spending the better part of the next year

    これが風変りな旅のはじまりでした

  • not only training my memory,

    翌年 多くの時間を割いて

  • but also investigating it,

    自分の記憶力を鍛えながら

  • trying to understand how it works,

    記憶について調べ どう機能しているか

  • why it sometimes doesn't work

    時々 機能しないのはなぜか

  • and what its potential might be.

    どのくらい可能性を秘めているかを

  • I met a host of really interesting people.

    理解しようとしました

  • This is a guy called E.P.

    たくさん面白い人に会いました

  • He's an amnesic who had, very possibly,

    この人は E.P.

  • the very worst memory in the world.

    記憶障害があって

  • His memory was so bad

    おそらく世界でいちばん 記憶力のない人です

  • that he didn't even remember he had a memory problem,

    そのため

  • which is amazing.

    自分に記憶障害があることすら 思い出せません

  • And he was this incredibly tragic figure,

    これはすごいことです

  • but he was a window into the extent

    とても悲劇的な人物ですが

  • to which our memories make us who we are.

    どの程度 記憶が

  • The other end of the spectrum: I met this guy.

    我々を形作っているかを知る 手がかりとなる存在です

  • This is Kim Peek.

    その対極にいるのが この人

  • He was the basis for Dustin Hoffman's character in the movie "Rain Man."

    キム・ピークです

  • We spent an afternoon together

    映画『レインマン』で ダスティン・ホフマンが演じた人物のモデルです

  • in the Salt Lake City Public Library memorizing phone books,

    ある日の午後 ソルトレイクシティーの公立図書館で

  • which was scintillating.

    一緒に電話帳を暗記して過ごしました

  • (Laughter)

    とても面白かった

  • And I went back and I read a whole host of memory treatises,

    (笑)

  • treatises written 2,000-plus years ago

    帰ってから記憶に関する文献を 読みあさりました

  • in Latin in Antiquity

    2000年以上前の古典古代や

  • and then later in the Middle Ages.

    その後 中世に

  • And I learned a whole bunch of really interesting stuff.

    ラテン語で書かれた文献です

  • One of the really interesting things that I learned

    いろいろ興味深いことを学びました

  • is that once upon a time,

    なかでも面白かったのは

  • this idea of having a trained, disciplined, cultivated memory

    かつては記憶力を

  • was not nearly so alien as it would seem to us to be today.

    訓練し 鍛え 高めることが

  • Once upon a time, people invested in their memories,

    今ほど奇妙な事ではなかったということです

  • in laboriously furnishing their minds.

    かつて人々は記憶 すなわち

  • Over the last few millennia

    心を強化することに 精力を注ぎました

  • we've invented a series of technologies --

    数千年にわたり 我々は

  • from the alphabet to the scroll

    様々な技術を発明してきました

  • to the codex, the printing press, photography,

    文字にはじまり 巻物 ―

  • the computer, the smartphone --

    写本 印刷機 写真 コンピュータや

  • that have made it progressively easier and easier

    スマートフォンにいたるまでです

  • for us to externalize our memories,

    これらによって 記憶を外在化し

  • for us to essentially outsource

    記憶という

  • this fundamental human capacity.

    人間の基盤となる能力を

  • These technologies have made our modern world possible,

    外部に委ねることが 次第に簡単になってきました

  • but they've also changed us.

    技術は現代社会を支える一方で

  • They've changed us culturally,

    我々自身にも変化をもたらしました

  • and I would argue that they've changed us cognitively.

    我々は文化的にも

  • Having little need to remember anymore,

    おそらく 認知的にも変わりました

  • it sometimes seems like we've forgotten how.

    覚える必要がなくなり

  • One of the last places on Earth

    記憶する方法を忘れてしまったようです

  • where you still find people passionate about this idea

    記憶力を鍛え 高めるという考えに

  • of a trained, disciplined, cultivated memory

    熱心な人々に会える ―

  • is at this totally singular memory contest.

    地上でほとんど最後の場所が

  • It's actually not that singular,

    このユニークな記憶コンテストなのです

  • there are contests held all over the world.

    ただ珍しいものではありません

  • And I was fascinated, I wanted to know how do these guys do it.

    世界中で開かれていますから

  • A few years back a group of researchers at University College London

    私は興味がわいて 彼らのやり方を 知りたくなりました

  • brought a bunch of memory champions into the lab.

    数年前にロンドン大学の研究者が

  • They wanted to know:

    記憶チャンピオンを研究対象に選びました

  • Do these guys have brains

    研究テーマは

  • that are somehow structurally, anatomically different from the rest of ours?

    彼らの脳が

  • The answer was no.

    構造的 解剖学的に普通の脳とちがうのか?

  • Are they smarter than the rest of us?

    そのこたえは「ノー」でした

  • They gave them a bunch of cognitive tests,

    では我々より頭がいいのか?

  • and the answer was not really.

    認知テストの結果 ―

  • There was however one really interesting and telling difference

    それほどでもないとわかりました

  • between the brains of the memory champions

    ただ 記憶チャンピオンの脳と

  • and the control subjects that they were comparing them to.

    普通の人の脳との間には

  • When they put these guys in an fMRI machine,

    明らかな違いがありました

  • scanned their brains

    チャンピオンの脳を

  • while they were memorizing numbers and people's faces and pictures of snowflakes,

    fMRIでスキャンし その間に

  • they found that the memory champions

    数字や顔や雪の結晶を 記憶してもらいました

  • were lighting up different parts of the brain

    すると普通の人と比較して

  • than everyone else.

    彼らは 脳の違う部分を

  • Of note, they were using, or they seemed to be using,

    使っていたのです

  • a part of the brain that's involved in spatial memory and navigation.

    特に 彼らが使う部分は

  • Why? And is there something the rest of us can learn from this?

    空間記憶とナビゲーションに 関わる部分のようです

  • The sport of competitive memorizing

    なぜでしょう? ここから何がわかるでしょう?

  • is driven by a kind of arms race

    スポーツとしての競技記憶は

  • where every year somebody comes up

    まるで軍拡競争のようです

  • with a new way to remember more stuff more quickly,

    毎年より多く より速く覚えるために

  • and then the rest of the field has to play catchup.

    新しい方法を思いつく人があらわれ

  • This is my friend Ben Pridmore,

    みんながそれに追いつこうとします

  • three-time world memory champion.

    友人のベン・プリドモアは

  • On his desk in front of him

    3度 世界チャンピオンになっています

  • are 36 shuffled packs of playing cards

    机の上には

  • that he is about to try to memorize in one hour,

    シャッフルされたカードが36組あります

  • using a technique that he invented and he alone has mastered.

    ベン自身が開発し 彼だけがマスターした技を使い

  • He used a similar technique

    1時間で暗記しようとしています

  • to memorize the precise order

    彼は同様のテクニックで

  • of 4,140 random binary digits

    4,140個のランダムな2進数の

  • in half an hour.

    正確な順序を

  • Yeah.

    30分で覚えました

  • And while there are a whole host of ways

    すごいでしょう

  • of remembering stuff in these competitions,

    競技会では

  • everything, all of the techniques that are being used,

    様々な記憶法が見られますが

  • ultimately come down to a concept

    そのテクニックはすべて

  • that psychologists refer to as elaborative encoding.

    心理学者が精緻な符号化と呼ぶ

  • And it's well illustrated by a nifty paradox

    概念に集約されます

  • known as the Baker/baker paradox,

    この概念を見事に具体化しているのが

  • which goes like this:

    Baker/bakerパラドクスです

  • If I tell two people to remember the same word,

    お見せしましょう

  • if I say to you,

    2人に同じ言葉を覚えてもらいます

  • "Remember that there is a guy named Baker."

    あなたは

  • That's his name.

    ベイカーという名前を覚えてください

  • And I say to you, "Remember that there is a guy who is a baker."

    人の名前です

  • And I come back to you at some point later on,

    あなたは baker つまり パン屋がいる場面を覚えてください

  • and I say, "Do you remember that word

    しばらく経ってから お二人にこうたずねます

  • that I told you a while back?

    「さっきの あの言葉 覚えていますか?

  • Do you remember what it was?"

    「さっきの あの言葉 覚えていますか?

  • The person who was told his name is Baker

    何でした?」

  • is less likely to remember the same word

    ベイカーという名前を教えられた人は

  • than the person was told his job is that he is a baker.

    パン屋という職業を聞いた人に比べて

  • Same word, different amount of remembering; that's weird.

    その言葉を思い出しにくかったのです

  • What's going on here?

    言葉は同じなのに記憶量が違う・・・ 変ですね

  • Well the name Baker doesn't actually mean anything to you.

    どうなっているのでしょうか?

  • It is entirely untethered

    実はベイカーという名前は あまり意味をもっていません

  • from all of the other memories floating around in your skull.

    この名前は頭の中にある他の記憶と

  • But the common noun baker,

    まったくつながりがないのです

  • we know bakers.

    パン屋のbakerはどうでしょう

  • Bakers wear funny white hats.

    みんなパン屋を知っています

  • Bakers have flour on their hands.

    面白い形の白帽をかぶり

  • Bakers smell good when they come home from work.

    手には小麦粉 ―

  • Maybe we even know a baker.

    仕事から帰ると いい匂いがします

  • And when we first hear that word,

    知り合いにパン屋がいるかもしれません

  • we start putting these associational hooks into it

    この言葉を聞いた瞬間に

  • that make it easier to fish it back out at some later date.

    連想する手がかりと結びつくので

  • The entire art of what is going on

    言葉を再び取り出すことが容易になります

  • in these memory contests

    記憶コンテストで使われる技術 ―

  • and the entire art of remembering stuff better in everyday life

    そして 日常生活で

  • is figuring out ways to transform capital B Bakers

    よりよく覚えるための こつは

  • into lower-case B bakers --

    ベイカーという名前を パン屋のbakerに変換する方法を

  • to take information that is lacking in context,

    知ることにほかなりません

  • in significance, in meaning

    文脈や意義や内容をもたない情報を

  • and transform it in some way

    取り上げて

  • so that it becomes meaningful

    頭の中にある

  • in the light of all the other things that you have in your mind.

    物事との関連から

  • One of the more elaborate techniques for doing this

    意味あるものへと 変換する方法を知ることなのです

  • dates back 2,500 years to Ancient Greece.

    これをさらに複雑にしたテクニックが

  • It came to be known as the memory palace.

    2500年前の古代ギリシャにありました

  • The story behind its creation goes like this:

    「記憶の宮殿」という名で知られます

  • There was a poet called Simonides

    この技の誕生にまつわる話があります

  • who was attending a banquet.

    詩人のシモニデスは

  • He was actually the hired entertainment,

    祝宴に参加していました

  • because back then if you wanted to throw a really slamming party,

    お雇い詩人だったのです

  • you didn't hire a D.J., you hired a poet.

    当時 最高のパーティをやろうと思ったら

  • And he stands up, delivers his poem from memory, walks out the door,

    DJじゃなく 詩人を雇ったのです

  • and at the moment he does, the banquet hall collapses,

    シモニデスは 詩を暗唱した後 部屋を出ます

  • kills everybody inside.

    その瞬間 宴会場が崩壊して

  • It doesn't just kill everybody,

    中にいた全員が死にます

  • it mangles the bodies beyond all recognition.

    それだけではなく

  • Nobody can say who was inside,

    損傷がひどくて誰が誰だか分かりません

  • nobody can say where they were sitting.

    誰が中にいて

  • The bodies can't be properly buried.

    どこに座っていたかもわからない

  • It's one tragedy compounding another.

    これではきちんと埋葬できない

  • Simonides, standing outside,

    悲劇が悲劇を呼びます

  • the sole survivor amid the wreckage,

    戸外にいたシモニデスは

  • closes his eyes and has this realization,

    惨事の唯一の生き残りです

  • which is that in his mind's eye,

    彼は目を閉じると あることに気づきます

  • he can see where each of the guests at the banquet had been sitting.

    心の目で

  • And he takes the relatives by the hand

    客がそれぞれ どこに座っていたかが見えるのです

  • and guides them each to their loved ones amid the wreckage.

    彼は犠牲者の親類の手をとり

  • What Simonides figured out at that moment

    がれきの中 最愛の人の元へと導きます

  • is something that I think we all kind of intuitively know,

    この時シモニデスが気づいたことは

  • which is that, as bad as we are

    誰もがおそらく 直感的にわかっていることです

  • at remembering names and phone numbers

    つまり我々は

  • and word-for-word instructions from our colleagues,

    名前や電話番号や同僚からの指示を