Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • - [Instructor] So some historians have actually said

    - 何人かの生徒が 歴史家は実際に言っている

  • that The Market Revolution is more revolutionary

    市場革命が の方が革命的

  • than The American Revolution.

    アメリカ革命よりも

  • Actually, this is a very classic AP-US-history question.

    実は、これは非常に 古典的なAP-US史の問題。

  • Which was more revolutionary:

    どっちが革命的だったのか

  • The American Revolution or The Market Revolution?

    アメリカ革命 それとも市場革命?

  • But how could something actually be more revolutionary

    しかし、どのようにして 革命的になる

  • than The American Revolution?

    アメリカ革命よりも?

  • It's because The Market Revolution

    それは、「市場革命」が

  • was a confluence of inventions,

    は発明の合流点でした。

  • changes in the way that the American people did business,

    が変わってきます。 アメリカ人はビジネスをしていた。

  • and changes in the way that people got goods to market

    と変化していきます。 衆人

  • that happened in this period from about 1790 to 1850.

    此の頃 1790年頃から1850年頃まで

  • So this is kind of a large period of history,

    だから、これは一種の 歴史の大きな時代。

  • and I don't think it's really important for you

    とは思いませんし お大事に

  • to have a laundry list of dates of exactly when

    洗い物をする 正確にいつ頃の日付の

  • what thing was invented, but just kind of take in the idea

    何が生まれたかというと かんがえにふける

  • that in the first half or so of the early 19th Century

    それが前半か後半に 斯くして19世紀初頭

  • there were many new inventions in both factory work

    沢山の新発明があった 工場での作業の両方で

  • and in transportation and communication,

    と交通や通信の分野で

  • and that how people did business changed a lot.

    如何にして ビジネスが大きく変わりました。

  • So I wanna take some time to look into

    だから時間をかけて調べたい

  • all three of these revolutions:

    この3つの革命のすべて

  • The Industrial Revolution,

    産業革命。

  • The Revolution in Transportation and Communication,

    交通機関の革命 とコミュニケーション。

  • and just the broader Market Revolution.

    と、より広範な市場革命だけである。

  • So I know this is a subset of itself, but I'll get to that.

    のサブセットであることを知っています。 それ自体はともかく、その話は後回しにします。

  • And in this video I wanna start out by talking

    このビデオでは 言い出す

  • about The Industrial Revolution.

    産業革命について。

  • OK, so what was The Industrial Revolution?

    産業革命とは何だったのか?

  • This was, broadly speaking,

    これは、大まかに言うと

  • a revolution in the kinds of machinery

    機械一新

  • that people used to make finished goods.

    人々が完成品を作るために使用していた

  • Now, if you think about the early republic

    さて、初期の共和国について考えてみると

  • in the United States you often think

    アメリカでは

  • of kind of an agrarian society;

    ある種の農耕社会のようなものです。

  • and that was how Thomas Jefferson,

    とトーマス・ジェファーソンが言っていました。

  • the author of The Declaration of Independence,

    の著者である 独立宣言。

  • really imagined the United States,

    アメリカを本気で想像していました。

  • as a nation of small farmers.

    小規模農家の国として

  • But Thomas Jefferson didn't necessarily see

    しかし、トーマス・ジェファーソン みないとも限らない

  • all of these revolutions in industry coming.

    一挙両得 業界では来ています。

  • He couldn't anticipate that;

    彼はそれを予想できなかった

  • and so, in the 1790s, early 1800s,

    ということで、1790年代、1800年代初頭には

  • a bunch of new inventions came to the United States

    一挙両得 渡米

  • that completely revolutionized how things were made.

    革命を起こした 物事がどのように作られたか

  • So in this time period the United States

    だから、この時代にアメリカは

  • kinda slowly begins its transformation

    遅々として変貌を遂げようとしている

  • from being a nation of farmers

    農民国家から

  • to a nation of people who worked for wages,

    民衆の国に 賃金のために働いていた人

  • by the hour,

    時間ごとに

  • and then used the money that they made

    で、その稼いだお金を使って

  • from that hourly labor to buy the things that they need.

    その時間労働から 彼らが必要とするものを

  • So how did this happen?

    で、どうしてこうなったの?

  • One event that historians often point to is the introduction

    歴史家がよくやるイベントの一つに みどころは導入

  • of the textile mill to the United States.

    の繊維工場をアメリカに

  • So this fellow here, his name is Samuel Slater,

    それで、この男は、彼の 名前はサミュエル・スレーター

  • and Samuel Slater was an Englishman

    とサミュエル・スレーターはイギリス人

  • who worked in a textile mill.

    織物工場で働いていた

  • And remember that the United Kingdom was

    そして忘れてはいけないのが、イギリスは

  • the world's capital of textile production in this time.

    世界の繊維の都 今回の制作。

  • And they were so jealous of their position

    そして、彼らは自分たちの立場に嫉妬していました。

  • as the world's leading textile producer

    世界有数の繊維メーカーとして

  • that they even made it illegal

    違法化しているというのに

  • to export the plans for a textile mill.

    織物工場の計画を輸出するために

  • Samuel Slater decided that even if it was illegal

    サミュエル・スレーターは 違法でも

  • to export actual plans,

    を使用して、実際の計画をエクスポートします。

  • it wasn't necessarily illegal to export his brain,

    とは限らない 彼の脳を輸出するのは違法だ

  • so he decided to memorize

    覚えることにしました。

  • how these textile looms worked;

    これらの織物織機がどのように機能していたか

  • and this is powered by a water wheel.

    そして、これは水車を動力源としています。

  • And then he actually got in disguise,

    そして、実際に変装した。

  • put himself on a ship, and came to Rhode Island

    船に乗り込んだ とロードアイランドに来て

  • to set up a textile mill.

    織物工場を設立するために

  • In fact, people were so angry that he did this that

    実際、人々は 是が非でも

  • in his home town he's actually known as Slater the Traitor.

    故郷では 裏切り者スレーターとして知られる

  • So what was new about this?

    で、何が新しかったの?

  • Well, I think the water-wheel aspect

    まあ、水車の側面は

  • is really one of the key innovations here.

    は本当にここでの重要なイノベーションの一つです。

  • So instead of being powered by humans

    だから、人間の力ではなく

  • or perhaps being powered by animals,

    あるいは、動物の力を借りているのかもしれません。

  • now American machinery can be powered by an outside source:

    今やアメリカの機械は 外部電源を使用しています。

  • so water or steam; and that means that these mills

    そう水か蒸気。 ということは、これらの工場は

  • and factories later are going to kinda congregate

    と工場は後から 擦り寄り

  • around sources of power, like rivers for example.

    力の源を中心に。 例えば川のように。

  • So if you've ever wondered why so many American cities

    だから、もしあなたが今までに疑問に思ったことがあるなら なぜアメリカの多くの都市は

  • are next to rivers, it's usually because

    が川の隣にあるのは、たいていの場合

  • they needed them to power mills.

    工場の動力源として必要だった

  • So starting in the 1790s,

    1790年代からですね。

  • and really into the early 19th Century,

    と本当に19世紀初頭に。

  • there's this slow transformation toward factory labor.

    遅変 工場労働に向けて

  • And you can see in this image here that a lot

    そして、この中には ちらほら

  • of the people actually laboring in these factories

    実際には、その人たちの こうじょうろうどう

  • were women because young men kind of had a pretty good path

    が女だったのは、若い男が 筋が通っていた

  • forward in life at this time period.

    この時期に人生を歩む

  • They could be farmers, like their fathers;

    父親のように農民になれるかもしれない。

  • maybe they could learn a trade.

    彼らは貿易を学ぶことができるかもしれない

  • But for young women there wasn't necessarily

    しかし、若い女性にとっては とは限らない

  • a form of income outside the house,

    家の外での収入の形。

  • and so a man named Charles Lowell

    それでチャールズ・ローウェルという男が

  • decided to set up a whole series

    シリーズ化することにしました。

  • of textile mills in what will be called

    と呼ばれるようになる織物工場の

  • Lowell, Massachusetts.

    マサチューセッツ州ローウェル

  • It's just outside of Boston.

    ボストンの郊外だ

  • And then he primarily employed young women

    主に若い女性を雇っていた

  • to work in these textile mills.

    これらの繊維工場で働くために

  • Think partly because young women

    若い女性だからというのもありますが

  • were associated with working with fabric;

    は、布を使った作業に関連していました。

  • women frequently did the spinning

    くるくる回る

  • and the sewing in the household;

    と家庭内での裁縫。

  • but also because women you could probably pay

    しかし、女性のためにも 払ってもいいかもしれない

  • a little bit less than young men for the same kind of labor.

    若さに比べれば少し物足りない 同じような労働のために男を雇う。

  • So this is kind of a very slow revolution

    だから、これは非常にゆっくりとした革命のようなものです。

  • toward individual work.

    個人の仕事に向かって

  • Because as a nation of farmers,

    農民の国として

  • most people would have worked in a family unit.

    たいていの人は 家族単位で働いていました。

  • And even some of the very earliest factories

    さらには、一部の 黎明期の工場

  • in the United States would hire family units.

    米国内 家族単位で雇うことになります。

  • It was known as the Rhode Island System.

    ロードアイランドシステムとして知られていました。

  • By this time, by Lowell's mills,

    この頃にはローウェルのミルズで

  • he started hiring individual workers for individual wages.

    彼は個人を雇い始めた 個人の賃金のための労働者

  • And the working conditions were pretty brutal.

    また、労働条件も かなり残忍だった

  • Most women at the Lowell mills worked

    ローウェル工場では、ほとんどの女性が働いていました。

  • 12-hour days with no air conditioning,

    エアコンのない12時間の日。

  • remember, this is long before there's air conditioning,

    忘るべからず エアコンがある

  • for pretty low wages.

    かなりの低賃金で

  • I'd say probably about three dollars a week.

    おそらく 週に3ドル

  • But despite the pretty harsh conditions,

    しかし、かなり厳しい条件にもかかわらず

  • for many of them this was a really good opportunity

    多くの人にとっては 縁起がいい

  • 'cause this was the first time in their lives

    なぜなら、これは 生まれて初めて

  • they'd ever had any chance to make money of their own,

    機会があったかどうか 自分たちでお金を稼ぐために

  • to be away from their families.

    家族から離れるために

  • It's kind of expected that if you were a young woman

    予想されていたことですが おんなだったら

  • in Massachusetts you wanted to go work in the Lowell mills.

    マサチューセッツでは ローウェル工場で働け

  • You could go there for a few years of your life,

    あなたはそこに行くことができます。 人生の数年

  • make a little bit of money,

    ちょっとしたお金を稼ぐ

  • and then go back to your hometown, meet someone,

    に戻って 故郷、出会い

  • get married, start a family of your own.

    結婚して自分の家庭を築く

  • So if kinda makes work for women

    女性のために仕事をするなら

  • outside the home respectable.

    家の外では立派な

  • And textile production is going to continue

    そして、繊維製品の生産 が続きます

  • to ramp up in the United States.

    アメリカで暴れまわっています。

  • In the late 1840s

    1840年代後半には

  • a man named Elias Howe

    イライアス・ハウという男

  • invents a really excellent sewing machine.

    本当に優れたミシンを発明する。

  • He's not the first man ever to invent a sewing machine.

    彼は初めての男ではない ミシンを発明するために

  • There were versions of them stretching back

    のバージョンがありました。 背筋が伸びる

  • to think even the 1750s,

    1750年代のことまで考えると

  • but Howe's sewing machine brought together

    しかし、ハウのミシンは一緒に持ってきた

  • a lot of different capacities that made it

    それを作った多くの異なった容量

  • kinda the best sewing machine.

    ミシンの中では一番いいんじゃないかな

  • And it will be even further refined by Isaac Singer,

    そして、それはさらに アイザック・シンガーによって洗練された

  • who we associate today with the Singer Sewing Machine.

    今をときめく人 シンガーミシンの

  • And so these massive textile mills

    そして、これらの巨大な繊維工場は

  • really become the backbone of New England commerce.

    肝を据える ニューイングランド商業の

  • But, they never would have gotten started

    しかし、彼らは決して始めなかっただろう

  • without another invention, which was the cotton gin.

    別の発明がなければ と言っていたのが、コットンジンでした。

  • And the cotton gin was invented by Eli Whitney in 1793.

    そして、コットンジンが発明されました。 1793年にイーライ・ホイットニーによって

  • And what's important about the cotton gin,

    そして、コットンジンの大切なこと。

  • so here's the gin, and basically it's kind of a box

    これがジンで 基本的には箱のようなもの

  • with some spikes on it that allows you to take

    棘のある とれる

  • these balls of cotton and separate them from the seeds.

    これらの綿球と を種から切り離します。

  • And separating cotton from the seeds

    綿と種を分けることも

  • was an extremely labor-intensive process.

    は非常に手間のかかる作業でした。

  • If you've never held a ball of cotton,

    コットンのボールを握ったことがなければ

  • it's extremely sticky, so you kinda have to wade through

    非常にベタベタしているので あちこちをうろうろしなければならない

  • the little bits of cotton, pull out these seeds.

    綿の小っちゃい部分を これらの種を引き出します。

  • It takes forever.

    永遠にかかります。

  • And so an average day's work would not produce

    だから、平均的な一日の 仕事にならない

  • all that much cotton that was ready for market.

    わたをまくって は市場に出回る準備ができていた。

  • Well, Whitney completely revolutionizes this

    まあ、ホイットニーは完全に これを革新する

  • with the cotton gin.

    コットンジンと一緒に

  • These little spikes help separate

    これらの小さなスパイクは、分離するのに役立ちます。

  • the cotton seeds from the cotton ball,

    から綿の種を取り出します。

  • and revolutionizes how much cotton can be produced

    の方法に革命を起こします。 わたはだか

  • by a single person in a single day.

    一日に一人の人間によって

  • Whitney's cotton gin made it possible for a single person

    ホイットニーのコットンジンが作った 一人でも可能

  • to process 50 pounds of cotton in a single day,

    50ポンドを処理するために コットンを一日で

  • which is just an order of magnitude more

    一桁違い

  • than they were able to do beforehand.

    事前にできたことよりも

  • This is really interesting 'cause it had

    これは本当に面白いですね。

  • kind of a massive human cost in the form

    莫大な人的コストをかけて

  • of really bolstering the institution of slavery

    を本当に強化するために 奴隷制度

  • in the American South because when farming cotton

    南米 というのも、綿花を栽培していると

  • was so labor-intensive it really wasn't very profitable;

    手間がかかる 本当に儲からなかった

  • and so the institution of slavery was actually

    ということで、制度 奴隷制度の

  • starting to die out a little bit.

    少し枯れ始めた

  • Before the 1790s people were saying:

    1790年代以前の人々は言っていた。

  • "Eh, I don't know if it's actually worth it to keep slaves."

    "えっ、どうかな? "奴隷を維持する価値がある"

  • So if it weren't for the cotton gin,

    もしコットンジンがなかったら

  • the United States might actually have outlawed slavery

    アメリカは 奴隷制を廃止する

  • considerably earlier than it ended up doing in the 1860s.

    随分前から 1860年代にやっていた

  • So it's interesting to note that even though these

    ということで、面白いのが これらのことに注意してください。

  • inventions really changed the fabric of American society,

    発明が本当に変えたのは アメリカ社会のファブリック。

  • allowed some people to earn money

    一部の人が稼げるようになった

  • who had never been able to earn money before,

    縁のない 前にお金を稼ぐために

  • it also meant that the institution of slavery

    という意味でもありました。 奴隷制度

  • was really entrenched in the United States

    がアメリカに定着していた

  • and would only continue to expand until the 1860s.

    しか続きません。 1860年代まで拡大していきます。

  • So that's a little bit of a peak into

    ということで、ちょっとしたピークで

  • the human cost of The Industrial Revolution.

    の人的コストは 産業革命だ

  • And we'll get more into what some of those costs were

    そして、私たちはより多くのことを知っています。 そのうちのいくつかは

  • and what some of the benefits were in the next video.

    とどのような利点のいくつか が次の動画に出ていました。

- [Instructor] So some historians have actually said

- 何人かの生徒が 歴史家は実際に言っている

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 革命 ミシン アメリカ 織物 繊維 発明

市場革命

  • 20 3
    Amy.Lin に公開 2017 年 10 月 21 日
動画の中の単語