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  • (Music)

  • Eight to be great: The eight traits successful people have in common.

  • Number two: work.

  • When I was interviewing all these successful people,

  • they kept telling me how hard they worked.

  • And I remember standing there thinking, "Ah, jeez, another comment about work?

  • Why don't they tell me the real secret to their success?"

  • Then finally I realized, hard work is a real secret to their success.

  • All successful people work very hard.

  • Martha Stewart said to me, "I'm a real hard worker.

  • I work and work and work all the time."

  • Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch said, "It's all hard work.

  • Nothing comes easily. But I have a lot of fun."

  • Did he say fun? Yes. Successful people have fun working.

  • That's why I say they're not really workaholics.

  • They're workafrolics.

  • Jim Pattison, chairman of the Jim Pattison Group, is a workafrolic.

  • He says, "Business is my recreation.

  • I'd rather go to our factories and meet with our people

  • than go to the beach, I can tell you that."

  • Dave Lavery, the NASA whiz who builds those robots for Mars,

  • said to me, "We work our fingers to the bone.

  • But it doesn't seem like work. It's fun.

  • It's what we want to do. We don't want to put things down and go home."

  • Bill Gates is a workafrolic. Even after he was a multimillionaire,

  • he worked most nights until 10 p.m., and only took two weeks off

  • in seven years. And he probably spent them on his computer.

  • Oprah is a workafrolic.

  • She says, "I never see daylight. I'd come into work at 5:30 in the morning

  • when it was dark, and leave at 7 or 8 when it was dark."

  • I'm a workafrolic.

  • And over the years, I've gone through many days and even weeks without much sleep,

  • just because I was having so much fun.

  • And I gotta admit, at times like that you say to yourself,

  • "Am I the only one working this hard?"

  • Because there's a myth it comes easy to some people.

  • You turn on the TV, nobody's working that hard.

  • A guy like Chris Rock stands up on stage,

  • tells a few jokes. What's hard about that?

  • But even Chris says, "I wasn't the funniest guy growing up,

  • but I was the guy who worked on being funny the hardest."

  • Trust me. I've interviewed over 500 successful people,

  • not one of them said it came easy,

  • even though they were doing what they loved.

  • We tend to underestimate work and overestimate talent.

  • But in the end, work tops talent.

  • Arthur Benjamin, America's best math whiz,

  • said to me, "I think numbers and I have always gotten along.

  • But I'm sure my 'talent' is just due to the time and hours and work

  • that I've put into it."

  • Many talented people don't achieve as much success as they could,

  • unfortunately, because they sit back on their talent

  • and never learn to work hard.

  • That's what happened to Michael Jordan when he first started playing basketball.

  • He had the talent, but he wasn't putting in the work,

  • and the coach actually cut him from the high school basketball team.

  • Boy, that was a wake-up call. He says, "I was very disappointed.

  • I started working on my game the day after I was cut."

  • And he soon became the hardest working player in basketball,

  • who made fun of the other players who weren't working hard.

  • And that hard work is what made him the greatest basketball player of all time.

  • So I'd say the real gift isn't talent,

  • it's the ability to work hard.

  • And we tend to underestimate work and overestimate smarts.

  • But in the end, work wins over smarts.

  • In fact, many successful people aren't the smartest, they just work the hardest.

  • Francois Parenteau, who Business Week called the top independent analyst on Wall Street,

  • said to me, "I'm certainly not that smart.

  • I can't even remember my own zip code."

  • But he also says, "Work is a big part of my life.

  • I think about investments pretty much 24 hours a day,

  • seven days a week."

  • Nez Hallett III is CEO of Smart Wireless,

  • and I thought, that's ironic because he told me he's not that smart.

  • He says, "I graduated from high school with a C average,

  • and college with a C-minus average."

  • But now the smart PhD's are reporting to him.

  • How did he do it?

  • He said, "If you're going to be successful at anything,

  • the key thing is to work hard."

  • I'm not smart.

  • As proof, here's my actual 12th grade report card.

  • It was the only one my parents ever kept.

  • Don't ask me why they kept it; it's nothing to brag about.

  • As you can see, I was a C student, not an A student.

  • I don't think I'd even make it into college these days.

  • So how did I achieve some success and wealth?

  • I just worked hard, many 60- to 80-hour weeks.

  • And now I know I'm not alone.

  • Thomas Stanley studied hundreds of millionaires,

  • and he discovered most millionaires weren't A students,

  • didn't score high on tests and teachers didn't think they'd ever succeed.

  • But they did succeed, because they worked hard.

  • So the good news is if you're not the smartest,

  • if you're a C student, not an A student,

  • the really good news is you can still succeed.

  • Because the word "success" has two C's and no A's.

  • (Laughter)

  • You can still succeed as long as you work hard.

  • And what if you are smart?

  • Well, I'm sorry, there's absolutely no hope for you.

  • Because many smart people don't achieve as much success as they could, unfortunately,

  • because they rest on their smarts and never learn to work hard.

  • Jeong Kim, president of Lucent Technologies, says,

  • "People who are the smartest sometimes don't realize their full potential,

  • because things get too easy, so they don't push themselves hard."

  • After a talk I gave at one of the world's top 10 business schools,

  • a man came up to me and said,

  • "You know, when I got my MBA here a few years ago,

  • I was one of the smartest people in the class.

  • I thought I had it made. So after I graduated,

  • I sat back and I didn't work hard.

  • And I went downhill.

  • And now, at this point in my life, I've gone nowhere.

  • I haven't achieved any success at all."

  • He said, "Thanks for the wake-up call. Now I know what I need to do.

  • I need to work."

  • So the bottom line is, whether you're smart or not,

  • whether you're talented or not, just keep working.

  • (Applause)

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TED-ED】Why it pays to work hard - Richard St. (【TED-Ed】Why it pays to work hard - Richard St. John)

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    mapuer に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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