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  • I'm sure we've all, at one point in our lives,

  • watched or read an anime or manga

  • that we've really felt we had a connection with.

  • Something that spoke to us on a deeper level

  • for whatever reason that may be.

  • Perhaps it reminded us of an experience we had in our lives

  • or conveyed a message where you really understood

  • or had some characters you could totally empathize with.

  • Because of it, we ended up growing a deep attachment

  • to the point where no matter what flaws the thing might actually have,

  • we could easily overlook it because...

  • well, it didn't matter.

  • It didn't affect our experience or why we got so attached to it.

  • And even if others did find flaws with it,

  • we didn't care.

  • As, they didn't have the same experience that you did.

  • To us, it was perfect.

  • Even if, objectively speaking,

  • The perfect anime, the perfect game, the perfect movie

  • cannot exist.

  • Recently, I was lucky enough to be able to see

  • the record-breaking

  • and it absolutely blew me away.

  • So much so, I had to watch it, not twice,

  • but 3 times before getting close to satisfied.

  • And it was after I walked out of the theater for the third time

  • that I knew I'd found my new perfect anime.

  • Except, I know that, critically speaking,

  • if I called this "perfect," or "a masterpiece,"

  • or any other overly superlative adjective,

  • there would be those of us who would argue the semantics of describing it such a way

  • 'cause, at the end of the day, it's an opinion that's subjective.

  • And I don't know why this word is so looked down upon

  • when we're talking critically about something.

  • Of course I know if a film isn't perfect.

  • The characters aren't the deepest, moments of it can play off melodrama,

  • and I'm sure if I thought deeply about it,

  • I can find plot holes because the film

  • speaks to the heart rather than to the mind.

  • Though, none of that actually matters to me

  • because I felt it achieved everything it need to,

  • and there's so much I love about this film

  • that I wouldn't change a single thing about it.

  • I can't remember the last time I saw something with so much charm and beauty to it

  • and there's just not one, single thing I can point at

  • to say why I love this movie.

  • The beautiful dichotomy of two star-crossed lovers

  • learning vicariously about one another.

  • capturing the care-free nature of adolescence

  • like that melancholic feeling of watching a long summer's day passing by.

  • That dreamlike quality of longing for something

  • that seems preordained yet lost

  • while mixing in themes like fantasy, long-distance relationships,

  • and natural disaster somehow weaving all this into a compelling narrative.

  • There are so many elements blending together

  • to create a piece of work that spoke to me on so many levels

  • that went beyond just breaking down

  • characters, animation, writing, and music.

  • I walked out of the theater with that same bittersweet joy

  • of meeting a lost friend you won't see again for a long time

  • with a reignited passion for this medium I love so much,

  • and that's not one thing you can just put on a 1-to-10 review scale.

  • To me, it was a masterpiece.

  • And no amount of plot holes, character writing, or melodrama

  • could take that away from me.

  • But I know that not everyone will share the same experience I did

  • or come to the same conclusion.

  • There will be people it didn't appeal to.

  • Some will have gotten too caught up in the hype,

  • or simply couldn't connect to it as much for whatever reason,

  • and that's fine.

  • No one will ever create a piece of work

  • that would appeal to absolutely everybody,

  • so why is it that we pretend a good review

  • is something that can objectively break down

  • what makes a piece of media good or not?

  • Many self-proclaimed critics I've seen

  • always harp back to the writing and characters

  • as the absolute backbone of what makes something good.

  • As if there's only one specific formula to making a great show.

  • Which is something I totally disagree with.

  • Sure there is a guidebook and theories

  • to what makes good film making and story telling,

  • which applies to the majority, but we shouldn't forget what they are.

  • A guide. Not an absolute.

  • And there are exceptions to every rule.

  • Every anime sets out to achieve something different

  • and part of the charm of certain movies or shows

  • is the way they are able to impress you even if it clearly has flaws.

  • Or sometimes even embracing them.

  • We say show, don't tell. Then along comes the Monogatari series

  • showing us that we can craft an interesting story

  • almost entirely through dialogue.

  • If characters and writing were all that mattered,

  • then we wouldn't get things like the mind-blowing visual

  • extravaganza that was Redline.

  • Gurren Lagann came to celebrate the cheesy heroic tropes

  • we all thought we were tired of.

  • And the ending of Evangelion was such a raw, unfiltered outcry of emotion

  • that love it or hate it - has remained a topic of discussion

  • and a resonating moment for many people to this day.

  • So what is it that really makes the show mean something to us?

  • The conclusion I've come to is that there is no single

  • technique that portrays this

  • but there is a common driving force I have felt from all these shows:

  • Passion and communication.

  • At the end of the day, anime is a form of art.

  • A way for the creators to communicate to the audience in some way.

  • Whether it be an idea, a feeling, an experience or something else.

  • And my favorite shows are the ones where this communication really resonated with me.

  • Maybe was a hype scene, a beautiful moment a genius piece of writing.

  • And I'm sure you all have your own personal examples.

  • Which is why I feel like the best critics are people who can break down why a movie or anime appeals to them,

  • and what aspect of it would appeal to an individual audience member.

  • Rather than a blanket statement of why it's objectively good.

  • Nothing about this is objective. So instead of condemning subjectivity, why aren't we embracing it?

  • Most of my favorite ever shows had nothing to do with ticking off some predetermined categories,

  • But some aspects of feeling that I really liked about it.

  • Recently I've seen an increase in people embracing the critical analysis of anime, which is great you know.

  • There's nothing wrong with promoting a smarter way of looking at a medium.

  • But I think in doing so, I feel we've created a community that upholds

  • having a higher knowledge and appreciation of the inner workings behind your favorite shows more than

  • just having fun.

  • It is possible to embrace critical thinking while acknowledging the subjectivity of it.

  • So we may a joke about it but there's certainly no such thing as a bad taste in anime.

  • In fact I think the worst thing you can do is either keep a closed mind or alter your taste so it's more respectable.

  • I've seen far too many people try to hide their actual taste

  • because they think it's too mainstream or two trashy or something that isn't critically acclaimed.

  • There's nothing wrong with your favorite anime,

  • even if it doesn't take all the boxes and characters or writing or cinematography

  • or if you just like it for some really stupid reason.

  • And it's definitely nothing wrong with thinking some critically acclaimed shows are just boring as hell.

  • if you can unashamedly say, hey i just really like this trashy show because it was trashy.

  • all the more power to you.

  • I unashamedly hold "love hina" close to me because

  • it reminds me of a time when, my adolescence romanticize the concept of just finding a partner who would accept me.

  • And every so often another show comes along it just appeals to that side of me

  • even if I know it's absolutely trashy.

  • Your taste reflect who you are as a person, your interests are shaped by your experiences,

  • and upbringing that made you the individual you are today.

  • So why the hell shouldn't you be proud of that?

  • It shouldn't be about having superior taste, it shouldn't be about showing off how much knowledge you have.

  • And it definitely shouldn't be about showing how much smarter you are than other people.

  • It should be about keeping an open mind, embracing individuality,

  • and most of all having fun!

  • I'm the type of guy who can be groping at the complex narrative presentation seen in Satoshi Kon's work,

  • and then arguing over which Monogatari girl has the most appealing bust in the same conversation.

  • In fact those were some of the most interesting conversations I've ever had.

  • With some of the most interesting people I've ever had the pleasure of meeting.

  • Whatever shows hold a special place in your heart, are special because that's the person you are.

  • so don't forget that.

  • and I guess all I really wanted to say through all this mindless rambling without any real point I was trying to make was that

  • I saw an anime the other day

  • and I liked it a lot. It was pretty great.

  • No...

  • In fact, it was perfect.

  • [Beautiful music plays]

  • [The End]

I'm sure we've all, at one point in our lives,

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B1 中級

パーフェクトアニメ (The Perfect Anime)

  • 197 10
    神速 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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