Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I'm a neuroscientist.

    私は神経科学者です

  • And in neuroscience,

    神経科学では

  • we have to deal with many difficult questions about the brain.

    脳に関しての多くの難問に立ち会います

  • But I want to start with the easiest question

    しかし私はその中でも最も簡単で

  • and the question you really should have all asked yourselves at some point in your life,

    だれもが人生の中で一度は問いかけるだろう

  • because it's a fundamental question

    脳の働きに対する理解の基本となる

  • if we want to understand brain function.

    疑問から始めましょう

  • And that is, why do we and other animals

    私たち人間や動物には

  • have brains?

    なぜ脳があるのか

  • Not all species on our planet have brains,

    この地球上の生物全てに脳があるわけではありません

  • so if we want to know what the brain is for,

    脳の存在理由を知るためには

  • let's think about why we evolved one.

    なぜ私たちの脳ができたのか考える必要があります

  • Now you may reason that we have one

    何かを感じたり考えたりするためだと

  • to perceive the world or to think,

    結論付けるかもしれませんが

  • and that's completely wrong.

    それは完全に間違いです

  • If you think about this question for any length of time,

    この質問を少し考えてみれば

  • it's blindingly obvious why we have a brain.

    脳が存在する理由は明らかになります

  • We have a brain for one reason and one reason only,

    脳を持つ理由はただ一つ

  • and that's to produce adaptable and complex movements.

    柔軟で複雑な動きを可能にすることです

  • There is no other reason to have a brain.

    これが脳を持つ唯一の理由です

  • Think about it.

    考えてみてください

  • Movement is the only way you have

    唯一 動作だけが周りの世界に

  • of affecting the world around you.

    働きかけのできる方法なのです

  • Now that's not quite true. There's one other way, and that's through sweating.

    例外は発汗だけです

  • But apart from that,

    それ以外は

  • everything else goes through contractions of muscles.

    すべて筋肉の収縮が伴います

  • So think about communication --

    コミュニケーションを考えてみてください

  • speech, gestures, writing, sign language --

    話し ジェスチャー 筆記 手話

  • they're all mediated through contractions of your muscles.

    すべて筋肉の収縮によって成り立っています

  • So it's really important to remember

    覚えておかなければいけないことは

  • that sensory, memory and cognitive processes are all important,

    感覚や記憶 認知の過程は重要ですが

  • but they're only important

    それらが必要なのは

  • to either drive or suppress future movements.

    将来的に動作に影響を与えるときだけです

  • There can be no evolutionary advantage

    後の動作に影響を与えないのであれば

  • to laying down memories of childhood

    幼少時代の記憶を保持したり

  • or perceiving the color of a rose

    バラの色を感知することには

  • if it doesn't affect the way you're going to move later in life.

    進化的な意義を持ちません

  • Now for those who don't believe this argument,

    この話を信じない人もいるかもしれません

  • we have trees and grass on our planet without the brain,

    木や草などには脳がありませんが

  • but the clinching evidence is this animal here --

    確たる証拠はこの

  • the humble sea squirt.

    地味な動物 ホヤです

  • Rudimentary animal, has a nervous system,

    この原始的な生物は神経系を持っており

  • swims around in the ocean in its juvenile life.

    幼生のときは海を泳ぎまわります

  • And at some point of its life,

    そしてあるときになると

  • it implants on a rock.

    岩にとりつきます

  • And the first thing it does in implanting on that rock, which it never leaves,

    永住の場所とした岩にとりついてはじめてするのは

  • is to digest its own brain and nervous system

    自分の脳と神経系を食物として

  • for food.

    消化することです

  • So once you don't need to move,

    一旦動く必要がなくなると

  • you don't need the luxury of that brain.

    脳のような贅沢品はいらないのです

  • And this animal is often taken

    この動物はよく

  • as an analogy to what happens at universities

    大学で終身雇用された教授の

  • when professors get tenure,

    比喩で持ち出されますが

  • but that's a different subject.

    それはまた別の機会にしましょう

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • So I am a movement chauvinist.

    私は動作至上主義者です

  • I believe movement is the most important function of the brain --

    動作こそが脳のもっとも重要な働きと信じていますし

  • don't let anyone tell you that it's not true.

    それは誰にも否定させたくありません

  • Now if movement is so important,

    動作はそれほど重要ですが

  • how well are we doing

    脳がどのように制御しているのかを

  • understanding how the brain controls movement?

    私たちはどれ位理解しているのでしょうか

  • And the answer is we're doing extremely poorly; it's a very hard problem.

    それはごくわずかであり とても難しい問題です

  • But we can look at how well we're doing

    しかし人間と同じ動作をする

  • by thinking about how well we're doing building machines

    機械を作ることによって いかに

  • which can do what humans can do.

    私たちがうまくやっているかを観察できます

  • Think about the game of chess.

    チェスの試合を例にしましょう

  • How well are we doing determining what piece to move where?

    駒を動かす戦略を私たちはどれほどうまくたてられるでしょうか

  • If you pit Garry Kasparov here, when he's not in jail,

    ゲイリー・カスパロフが収監される前にIBMの

  • against IBM's Deep Blue,

    ディープブルーと対戦したとすると

  • well the answer is IBM's Deep Blue will occasionally win.

    ディープブルーが勝つこともあったでしょう

  • And I think if IBM's Deep Blue played anyone in this room, it would win every time.

    ここにいる誰かが相手なら 絶対に勝つでしょう

  • That problem is solved.

    これが答えです

  • What about the problem

    では 次の質問

  • of picking up a chess piece,

    チェスの駒を取り上げて

  • dexterously manipulating it and putting it back down on the board?

    器用に動かし 盤上に戻すのはどれほどうまくできるでしょうか

  • If you put a five year-old child's dexterity against the best robots of today,

    5歳の子供の器用さと最新のロボットを比べても

  • the answer is simple:

    答えは簡単です

  • the child wins easily.

    子供が容易に勝つでしょう

  • There's no competition at all.

    勝負になりません

  • Now why is that top problem so easy

    なぜ上の問題はそう簡単なのに

  • and the bottom problem so hard?

    下の問題はそんなに難しいのでしょうか

  • One reason is a very smart five year-old

    とても賢い5歳の子供ならば

  • could tell you the algorithm for that top problem --

    上の問題には答えられるかもしれません

  • look at all possible moves to the end of the game

    最終局まで可能な進め方を考え

  • and choose the one that makes you win.

    勝てるものを選び出すこと

  • So it's a very simple algorithm.

    それはとても単純なことです

  • Now of course there are other moves,

    もちろん間違うこともありますが

  • but with vast computers we approximate

    巨大なコンピュータを使えば

  • and come close to the optimal solution.

    正解に近づけることはできます

  • When it comes to being dexterous,

    器用さとなると

  • it's not even clear what the algorithm is you have to solve to be dexterous.

    どんなアルゴリズムを解くのかも はっきりしません

  • And we'll see you have to both perceive and act on the world,

    周りの世界を把握し 働きかけることが必要で

  • which has a lot of problems.

    それが多くの問題をはらんでいます

  • But let me show you cutting-edge robotics.

    最新のロボット工学をご覧ください

  • Now a lot of robotics is very impressive,

    今では多くの驚くべきロボットがあります

  • but manipulation robotics is really just in the dark ages.

    しかし動作ロボット工学はまさに暗黒時代です

  • So this is the end of a Ph.D. project

    最高のロボット工学研究所の一つの

  • from one of the best robotics institutes.

    博士号プロジェクトの結果がこれです

  • And the student has trained this robot

    学生がこのロボットを訓練し

  • to pour this water into a glass.

    グラスに水を注げるようにしました

  • It's a hard problem because the water sloshes about, but it can do it.

    水がはねるので難しい課題でしたが 行うことは可能です

  • But it doesn't do it with anything like the agility of a human.

    しかし人間のような機敏さはまったくありません

  • Now if you want this robot to do a different task,

    違う動作をさせたいと考えるとすると

  • that's another three-year Ph.D. program.

    それはまた3年間の博士号プロジェクトが必要です

  • There is no generalization at all

    ここには一つのタスクから他につながるような

  • from one task to another in robotics.

    一般化はまったくありません

  • Now we can compare this

    ではこの例と 人間の中でも

  • to cutting-edge human performance.

    もっともすばらしいパフォーマンスとを比べてみましょう

  • So what I'm going to show you is Emily Fox

    このエミリー・フォックスさんはカップ・スタッキングの

  • winning the world record for cup stacking.

    世界記録保持者です

  • Now the Americans in the audience will know all about cup stacking.

    アメリカ人の方はこの競技をご存知と思いますが

  • It's a high school sport

    高校のスポーツで

  • where you have 12 cups you have to stack and unstack

    12個のカップを決まった順序でなるべく早く

  • against the clock in a prescribed order.

    積み重ねたり並べたりします

  • And this is her getting the world record in real time.

    これは彼女が世界記録をとったときの実速度の映像です

  • (Laughter)

    (拍手)

  • (Applause)

    とてもうれしそうです

  • And she's pretty happy.

    頭の中で起こっていることはわかりませんが

  • We have no idea what is going on inside her brain when she does that,

    それこそが知りたいことなのです

  • and that's what we'd like to know.

    そこで私のチームは

  • So in my group, what we try to do

    ヒトがどのように動作を制御するか リバースエンジニアすることに挑戦しました

  • is reverse engineer how humans control movement.

    簡単なことに思えるかもしれません

  • And it sounds like an easy problem.

    指令を送って それに対応して筋肉が収縮し

  • You send a command down, it causes muscles to contract.

    腕や身体が動き

  • Your arm or body moves,

    視覚 皮ふや筋肉などからのフィードバックがある

  • and you get sensory feedback from vision, from skin, from muscles and so on.

    問題は

  • The trouble is

    それらが望むようなきれいな信号ではないことです

  • these signals are not the beautiful signals you want them to be.

    動作を制御するときに難しいことのひとつが

  • So one thing that makes controlling movement difficult

    フィードバックがノイズだらけということです

  • is, for example, sensory feedback is extremely noisy.

    ノイズといっても音ではなく

  • Now by noise, I do not mean sound.

    工学や神経科学の世界で 信号を破損させる

  • We use it in the engineering and neuroscience sense

    ランダム・ノイズという意味で使っています

  • meaning a random noise corrupting a signal.

    昔 デジタルラジオが出る前の古いラジオで選局するときに

  • So the old days before digital radio when you were tuning in your radio

    聞こえるガガガという音

  • and you heard "crrcckkk" on the station you wanted to hear,

    それがノイズです

  • that was the noise.

    もっと一般的に言うと信号を破損させるものです

  • But more generally, this noise is something that corrupts the signal.

    例を挙げると 机の下に手を置いて

  • So for example, if you put your hand under a table

    反対の手で位置を当てようとすると

  • and try to localize it with your other hand,

    数センチの誤差がでるでしょう

  • you can be off by several centimeters

    それは感覚にノイズが発生したからです

  • due to the noise in sensory feedback.

    それと同様に 運動の表す信号に作動の信号を重ねると

  • Similarly, when you put motor output on movement output,

    雑音だらけになってしまいます

  • it's extremely noisy.

    ダートゲームで標的の中心を狙わずに

  • Forget about trying to hit the bull's eye in darts,

    同じところを何度も狙ってみましょう

  • just aim for the same spot over and over again.

    動作には大きな振れ幅があり矢は大きくばらつきます

  • You have a huge spread due to movement variability.

    それ以上に 外の世界 仕事は

  • And more than that, the outside world, or task,

    不定でかつ多様です

  • is both ambiguous and variable.

    ティーポットは満杯や空のときがあり

  • The teapot could be full, it could be empty.

    時とともに変化します

  • It changes over time.

    私たちはそうしたノイズだらけの中で動いているわけです

  • So we work in a whole sensory movement task soup of noise.

    このノイズはとてもひどいので

  • Now this noise is so great

    この影響を少なくできる人には 社会の中で

  • that society places a huge premium

    大きな賞賛が与えられます

  • on those of us who can reduce the consequences of noise.

    もしあなたが金属の棒で小さな白球(ゴルフボール)を

  • So if you're lucky enough to be able to knock a small white ball

    数百メートル先の穴に入れることができたなら

  • into a hole several hundred yards away using a long metal stick,

    この社会は何億ドルの賞金で

  • our society will be willing to reward you

    あなたを賞賛するでしょう

  • with hundreds of millions of dollars.

    ここで私が皆さんに納得していただきたいことは

  • Now what I want to convince you of

    脳もこうしたノイズや変動が及ぼす影響を

  • is the brain also goes through a lot of effort

    減らすために 多くの努力を

  • to reduce the negative consequences

    しているということです

  • of this sort of noise and variability.

    ここで ある概念を紹介しましょう

  • And to do that, I'm going to tell you about a framework

    統計学や機械学習の分野ではこの50年とても一般的なもので

  • which is very popular in statistics and machine learning of the last 50 years

    ベイズ決定理論と呼ばれています

  • called Bayesian decision theory.

    この考えは最近になって

  • And it's more recently a unifying way

    脳の不確定要素に対する扱いを考える時の方法として支持されてきています

  • to think about how the brain deals with uncertainty.

    基本的には推測の後に行動を開始するという考え方です

  • And the fundamental idea is you want to make inferences and then take actions.

    推測について考えましょう

  • So let's think about the inference.

    周囲の世界に対して信念を形成する必要があります

  • You want to generate beliefs about the world.

    ではその信念とは何でしょうか

  • So what are beliefs?

    信念とは次のような 自分の腕がどこにあるのか や

  • Beliefs could be: where are my arms in space?

    自分が見ているのは猫なのか狐なのか といったものです

  • Am I looking at a cat or a fox?

    こういった信念を私たちは確率をもってみています

  • But we're going to represent beliefs with probabilities.

    つまり信念とは

  • So we're going to represent a belief

    0と1の間にあるのです

  • with a number between zero and one --

    0は全く信じていない状態 1は間違いなく確かという状態です

  • zero meaning I don't believe it at all, one means I'm absolutely certain.

    途中の数字は不確定さを表しています

  • And numbers in between give you the gray levels of uncertainty.

    ベイズ推論の鍵となる考え方は

  • And the key idea to Bayesian inference

    推論をするにあたり

  • is you have two sources of information

    2つの情報源があることです

  • from which to make your inference.

    データと

  • You have data,

    神経科学的なデータは感覚入力です

  • and data in neuroscience is sensory input.

    感覚からの入力があるので信念を形成することができます

  • So I have sensory input, which I can take in to make beliefs.

    しかしもうひとつの情報源として事前知識があります

  • But there's another source of information, and that's effectively prior knowledge.

    人は人生の中で記憶として知識を蓄えます

  • You accumulate knowledge throughout your life in memories.

    ベイズ決定理論のポイントは

  • And the point about Bayesian decision theory

    事前知識と感覚からの入力を

  • is it gives you the mathematics

    元に新しい信念を作る際に

  • of the optimal way to combine

    効率的な組み合わせ方に

  • your prior knowledge with your sensory evidence

    数学的な解を与えるところです

  • to generate new beliefs.

    ここに公式をお見せします

  • And I've put the formula up there.

    これをそのまま説明はしませんが とても美しいのです

  • I'm not going to explain what that formula is, but it's very beautiful.

    美しくかつ説得力もあります

  • And it has real beauty and real explanatory power.

    これが証明するもの 推測されるものは

  • And what it really says, and what you want to estimate,

    感覚からの入力が与えられたときの

  • is the probability of different beliefs

    それぞれの信念の可能性です

  • given your sensory input.

    直観的な例をあげましょう

  • So let me give you an intuitive example.

    テニスを練習しているときに

  • Imagine you're learning to play tennis

    ネットを超えて向かってきたボールがどこで弾むかを

  • and you want to decide where the ball is going to bounce

    推測したいと思います

  • as it comes over the net towards you.

    ベイズ理論によると そこには

  • There are two sources of information

    2つの情報源があります

  • Bayes' rule tells you.

    感覚からの入力は 視覚や聴覚を使うことにより

  • There's sensory evidence -- you can use visual information auditory information,

    ボールがその赤い地点に着地するというでしょう

  • and that might tell you it's going to land in that red spot.

    ただし ご存知のように感覚は完璧ではないので

  • But you know that your senses are not perfect,

    ボールが着地する地点はバラツキがあって

  • and therefore there's some variability of where it's going to land

    赤い雲で示されています

  • shown by that cloud of red,

    0.1から0.5の数字を示しています

  • representing numbers between 0.5 and maybe 0.1.

    この情報は今のショットから得ることができるものですが

  • That information is available in the current shot,

    もうひとつ情報源は

  • but there's another source of information

    このショットからは得ることができません

  • not available on the current shot,

    テニスの試合を何度も経験することによってだけ身に付くことで

  • but only available by repeated experience in the game of tennis,

    試合中のボールの行方はコート全体で

  • and that's that the ball doesn't bounce

    均等ではないということです

  • with equal probability over the court during the match.

    対戦相手がとても強い場合

  • If you're playing against a very good opponent,

    あなたにとっては返しづらい

  • they may distribute it in that green area,

    緑の区域にボールを

  • which is the prior distribution,

    打ってくるでしょう

  • making it hard for you to return.

    これら2つの情報は重要な情報を持っています

  • Now both these sources of information carry important information.

    ベイズ理論によると

  • And what Bayes' rule says

    赤の数字と緑の数字を掛け合わせ

  • is that I should multiply the numbers on the red by the numbers on the green

    楕円型の黄色の数字を導き出す

  • to get the numbers of the yellow, which have the ellipses,

    それが信念なのです

  • and that's my belief.

    これが効率的に情報を組み合わせる方法です

  • So it's the optimal way of combining information.

    数年前でしたらこの話をしなかったと思います

  • Now I wouldn't tell you all this if it wasn't that a few years ago,

    その後これこそがまさしく人が新しい動作を

  • we showed this is exactly what people do

    学習するときの方法だということが分かりました

  • when they learn new movement skills.

    これが意味するところは

  • And what it means

    私たちはまさしくベイズ推論のとおりに動いているということです

  • is we really are Bayesian inference machines.

    生きる中で 周りの確率的な世界から学んだことを基に

  • As we go around, we learn about statistics of the world and lay that down,

    するだけではなく

  • but we also learn

    感覚がいかにノイズだらけなのかも学び

  • about how noisy our own sensory apparatus is,

    それらを実生活の中で

  • and then combine those

    ベイズ式に組み合わせているのです

  • in a real Bayesian way.

    ベイズの中で鍵となるのは公式のこの部分です

  • Now a key part to the Bayesian is this part of the formula.

    この部分というのは

  • And what this part really says

    信念に影響を与える

  • is I have to predict the probability

    感覚からの様々な入力の持つ確率を

  • of different sensory feedbacks

    予測しなければいけないということです

  • given my beliefs.

    これは未来を予期しなくてはいけないということです