Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This is kind of nice.

  • Because it is incredibly difficult to contain what you want to say

  • in 18 minutes, but it's for me anyway.

  • So we kind of showed you earlier on what goes wrong under pressure.

  • The human brain is constantly getting a signal from all the bodily systems,

  • but particularly the heart, the vagus nerve,

  • which, as we showed you is sort of erratic and under pressure,

  • super chaos causes that DIY lobotomy.

  • You're all built that way, and you've all had the experience

  • when somebody kind of puts a challenge to you

  • and it doesn't really matter as you saw how small that challenge is.

  • It can be any type of challenge.

  • A challenge to your point of view, a challenge to your ego,

  • a challenge to your relationships,

  • any type of challenge causes the physiology to go chaotic,

  • causes the frontal lobe to be inhibited, and you become suboptimal straight away.

  • What's kind of interesting about that is when the brain is inhibited;

  • it also inhibits your perceptual awareness,

  • so you don't realize it's happened.

  • So you can come out of a meeting and think, "Oh, that went well."

  • And everyone,s going, "What do you mean it went well? You were rubbish."

  • Because your awareness is inhibited, you don't realize how rubbish you were.

  • So it's a bit of a catch-22.

  • This is the phenomena that underpins lots of different things

  • that you've seen and experienced yourself or seen on telly:

  • Stage-fright, people get stage fright and can't remember their words;

  • Kids go blank in an exam.

  • It's the same phenomena.

  • Or my personal favorite - Family Fortunes, if you've ever watched that show -

  • the two people sit at the front.

  • We've asked 100 people on the street

  • to name something you put in a jacket potato.

  • (Bzz) "Jam!"

  • (Laughter)

  • It's hysterical.

  • When your frontal lobe's inhibited you say anything, and it's really funny.

  • Anne Robinson, The Weakest Link,

  • she throws you a simple question, then stares at you.

  • You blurt out any all sort of rubbish.

  • So when you're up with your boss, he might be the nicest boss in the world.

  • If you're feeling a little under pressure,

  • you suddenly discover you're talking rubbish.

  • Sometimes you even have that awareness.

  • You almost see yourself coming out with the most ridiculous nonsense.

  • You think, "Why is this happening?" It's because you're built that way.

  • The human system is built that way is that under pressure,

  • physiological chaos, the brain shuts down.

  • You're designed that way.

  • You think, "Why are we designed that way?"

  • And the only reason you have anything in your physiology is survival.

  • There are survival advantages to having brain shut down,

  • and it goes back 200,000 years.

  • So when you were wandering across the prairie,

  • and a big grizzly bear comes out from behind the rocks and says,

  • "Oh, human being! There's my lunch."

  • You don't need clever thinking.

  • In fact, if you stood going to be clever,

  • "Is that the brown bear, or the lesser-spotted gray bear?"

  • (Laughter)

  • He will eat you, right?

  • So you need brain shut down.

  • Your thinking has to become very unsophisticated,

  • in fact, it has to become binary.

  • So you either have fight-flight or play dead. Two choices.

  • You either just drop to the ground in a faint,

  • or you're prepared to slug it out or run.

  • It's binary.

  • Anything more sophisticated you don't need, it will kill you.

  • So here we are, 200,000 years later,

  • we still have the same biological mechanism.

  • We've basically got a 200,000-year-old software,

  • and we've never had the upgrade, right?

  • We don't meet a bear today; we meet each other.

  • But in meeting each other, the same phenomenon goes on.

  • We showed you how that chaos

  • can cause somebody who's even good at math, like Neil is,

  • "Uh ... 200 ... Uh ... Shut up, you're putting me off! 200 ... Uh ..."

  • It becomes impossible, a simple task like that.

  • I can tell you, I did this in the office of the chief exec,

  • one of the leading retailers in the UK,

  • and his first answer was 298.

  • (Laughter)

  • And, he went, "Oh. No, that's wrong!"

  • He was so embarrassed that he got the first one wrong,

  • he couldn't think of the second one.

  • It literally sounds like, "Ah ..." a rabbit in the headlights.

  • He just couldn't come up with anything.

  • So as I said, you're all at the mercy of that.

  • The point being, until you've got control of this physiology,

  • anybody can make you look like an idiot.

  • And what's worse?

  • You're doing it to yourself an awful lot of the time.

  • Your own anxiety about your own performance

  • is actually causing the chaos, so you're lobotomizing yourself.

  • A lot of people around you can trigger you into a lobotomy,

  • but most of the time, you're just lobotomizing yourself.

  • So until you've got control of that absolutely, fundamental basic -

  • you might be brilliant one day, you might be poor,

  • and who knows what's going to show up that day.

  • So right about fundamental, the cleverness of your thinking,

  • or your ability to read the line on a golf putt,

  • or your ability to come up with a great idea,

  • or how to innovate that sales process, or any of that stuff.

  • The quality of your thought, in fact, the very things that you think,

  • and how well you think them is hugely influenced by your biology.

  • I'll give a couple of live examples, then get Neil back up,

  • and we'll show you how to control your physiology.

  • So if you haven't yet clocked

  • that your biology is controlling your brain function.

  • If we held you and locked the doors and filled you up with coffee,

  • what happens is your bladder gets bigger and bigger and bigger.

  • It starts to send alarm messages to your brain,

  • and you're getting one of these pee.

  • "I've got to pee ... I've got to pee."

  • If you've ever had that experience

  • when you can't get out, but your bladder is sending alarm signals,

  • and all of that - you haven't got Pampers on -

  • (Laughter)

  • what you'll discover is you go deaf.

  • You ever notice that? You can't hear people.

  • You're so internally focused, "My bladder is going to burst..."

  • You go deaf.

  • You can see people's mouths moving, but you can't hear what they're saying.

  • Then beads of sweat start to break out,

  • you're trying to pee urine out through your forehead.

  • (Laughter)

  • Literally, your consciousness is completely eradicated.

  • So that's the biology disrupting your consciousness.

  • Well, I was in a meeting recently with an eight-month-pregnant woman.

  • We were chatting away,

  • and you saw the baby visibly ripple across, went like that,

  • and you could see the ripple go across her abdomen,

  • and she was chatting, then ..."Ooh ..."

  • For about 20 seconds she was gone, completely kind of left the room, "Oh ..."

  • and then she went, "Oh, hello!"

  • (Laughter)

  • Back in the room again.

  • It was like her consciousness disappeared for 20 seconds.

  • So these are live examples.

  • You think you just think, right?

  • But what do you think, and why do you think it?

  • I was talking to a senior exec, he was from a government think tank.

  • I said, "Oh, government think tank, that's interesting!

  • You probably sit around with loads of clever people

  • debating the issues of the day

  • and trying to come up with some clever answers."

  • He said, "Yes, pretty much what we do."

  • I said, "Have you ever thought

  • about why those answers are not these other answers?

  • Have you ever thought about your own thinking?"

  • He said, "I never thought about that."

  • "Spotted it! You're a think-tank; you've never thought about thinking.

  • What's that about?"

  • So we just think,

  • but we don't realize that what we think and how well we think it,

  • is actually influenced by something else.

  • Thought is really an emergent property within your system.

  • The very things that you think,

  • you will think different things if you're happy than if you're depressed.

  • And how well you think them will depend a lot on the biology.

  • So if you want to step-change thinking,

  • if you want to really double or treble the quality of your thinking,

  • you can't do it by thinking about it.

  • Wouldn't that be nice if I said,

  • "Look, I've spotted the problem for you in your life,

  • you're not thinking smart enough.

  • So I want you to go away over the weekend,

  • come back 25 percent smarter on Monday morning, alright?"

  • That will be nice, wouldn't it?

  • "Oh, I haven't thought to do that,

  • I'll go away, and I'll think about my thinking over the weekend,

  • 25 percent better on Monday, here I am!"

  • It doesn't work that way.

  • That's what Einstein said, "We can not solve our problems

  • with the same level of thinking that created them."

  • You don't get a new level of thinking just by thinking about it.

  • You've got to change the context in which thoughts emerge.

  • It's the context, in human terms, is the biology.

  • What is the biological context from which thought emerges?

  • What is the emotional state from which thought emerges?

  • You change that context, the biological and emotional context,

  • and you can change the quality of the thought,

  • and the actual thought itself.

  • That is the source.

  • I suggest we get Chris back up

  • and I'll show you how Chris can learn with no training before,

  • how to control his physiology.

  • You do not need to be - sorry, Neil - a yogic master.

  • (Laughter)

  • Neil: What happens to short term memory?

  • (Laughter)

  • Here we go.

  • Which ear are we on? Neil: This one.

  • If you just hold that, change chair around a bit if you like.

  • Turn your chair around, so you can see the screen more easily.

  • So exactly as before, is he still alive? Yeah.

  • So we'll start recording.

  • So again, just picking up each heartbeat,

  • the software is measuring the distance between each heart beat

  • and calculating his heart rate.

  • Because he walked up the stage out of the audience,

  • he's going about 90 miles an hour.

  • Just the excitement about being the front here.

  • So if you want to control your physiology,

  • this isn't years and years and months and months of practice.

  • You don't have to be a yogic master to control your physiology.

  • You just have to know exactly what to do, right?

  • So we're now going to show Chris, sorry, Neil exactly what to do.

  • (Laughter)

  • Mental block.

  • Over here is a breath pacer,

  • so when that goes up, I want you to breathe in ... (Inhales)

  • when that goes down, I want you to breathe out. (Exhales)

  • At the bottom, there's a hold. So wait for it. Don't go too soon, ready?

  • (Inhales)

  • And a long, slow ... (Exhales) Okay?

  • Wait for it.

  • (Inhales) A long, slow ... (Exhales)

  • You can follow this in the room, if you want,

  • just breathe in this rhythmic fashion.

  • It's a nice rhythmic breathing.

  • So a long breath in, and a long, slow breath out.

  • I'll leave Neil to do that, and I'll carry on talking to you guys.

  • So of all the things that you can do to get your physiology under control,

  • there are many things.

  • But the start point is to do something that you can get conscious control over,

  • and you can get conscious control over your breathing.

  • Now, there are 12 different aspects of your breath that you can regulate.

  • 12 different aspects.

  • So when you go to classes,

  • whether it's singing, sports, fighter pilots, all sorts of things,

  • they'll talk to you about breathing and breath practice.

  • Yoga, you know.

  • But what are they teaching you?

  • For example, there's a yogic practice

  • where they teach you alternate nostril breathing.

  • That's kind of interesting,

  • but in my view, that's number nine on the list of priorities, of the 12.

  • The single most important thing is rhythm, which is what this is training.

  • So we've seen that this measures the level of coherence in Neil's system.

  • When he's in complete chaos, he's down here in the red.

  • And just with a bit of guidance, in less than or about a minute,

  • he's up and into the coherent green.

  • He is the yogic master.