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  • Hi, my name is Emma and today's lesson is a fun lesson on going to

  • the hairdresser's. So, as you've seen in some of my videos if you watch my

  • videos, I have had different haircuts.

  • That's what we're going to be focusing on today.

  • What do you say when you want to change your hair? Okay? So,

  • the first thing I want to teach you is the difference between a barber and

  • a hairdresser, and a barbershop and a hair salon.

  • Okay? So, notice I've written "barber" and "barbershop" in blue.

  • Why do you think I did that? Well,

  • it's because boys and men go to the barber,

  • who is the person who cuts the hair,

  • and the barber works at the barbershop.

  • So the barbershop is the place and the barber is the person.

  • They deal with men only -- boys and men only,

  • so no women. Now, I've written this one in red because I didn't have a

  • pink marker. But we also have hairdressers,

  • so these are people. Where do hairdressers work? At hair salons.

  • Okay, so with hairdressers, unlike with barbers,

  • hairdressers work with both men and women.

  • So they work with both at the hair salon.

  • Okay? So now let's look at some common phrases we may use when we go

  • to the hair salon. If I want to get my hair changed I may say,

  • "I would like to get", or I could say,

  • "I would like to have", so you have a choice.

  • They're both equal. "I would like to have a cut."

  • Okay? This means they just cut your hair.

  • "I would like to have a wash and cut."

  • This means they wash your hair first,

  • and then they cut it.

  • "I would like to get a wash,

  • cut, and dry". In this case,

  • they wash your hair, they cut it,

  • and then they blow-dry it,

  • and maybe they style it a bit.

  • I can also say, "I would like to get a trim".

  • So, what is a trim? A trim is a very little cut.

  • So my hair is getting kind of long.

  • I want it maybe to about here.

  • I'm going to get a trim.

  • How much should I get cut off? Maybe I'll say,

  • "I'd like two inches off."

  • So that's a trim, two inches.

  • Okay? Finally, another expression that you may need,

  • "I would like to get a perm."

  • So what's a perm? A perm stands for permanent,

  • and permanent means something that doesn't change.

  • So maybe I have very straight hair,

  • and I don't like straight hair.

  • Maybe I like curly hair.

  • So I may get a perm,

  • so my hair is always curly.

  • Or, maybe I get a perm so my hair is always straight.

  • So they use chemicals to change your hair so it's either curly or straight.

  • So that's a perm. Now one thing I'd like to draw your attention to is,

  • first of all, this is very polite to say,

  • which is good. "I would like",

  • I can also say - I'll write it here - "I'd like".

  • So both of these are correct.

  • "I would like", "I'd like", "to get",

  • "to have", and what do these five things have in common?

  • They all need an article, because these - a cut is a noun,

  • a wash and cut, a wash,

  • cut, and dry, a trim, a perm.

  • Okay? So they need articles.

  • One other thing I should mention about perms,

  • I said they're permanent, but when we talk about perms they don't last forever.

  • So if you get one perm it's not going to last you the rest of

  • your life. It may last you two months,

  • one month, three months. So even though we say "permanent" it's not forever.

  • It's actually for kind of a short time,

  • just longer than a lot of other hair treatments.

  • Okay. So, now we have another phrase.

  • "I'd", which stands for "I would",

  • so again, you have that choice.

  • "I'd like to get my hair...",

  • okay, so notice, before we had "I'd like to get a cut."

  • Now we're saying "I'd like to get my hair cut."

  • So this is another option.

  • You can say, "I'd like to get a cut.",

  • "I'd like to get my hair cut."

  • Two different ways to say the same thing.

  • "I'd like to get my hair colored."

  • So maybe I want to change the color of my hair.

  • I'd go to the hairdresser and say,

  • "I'd like to get my hair colored".

  • "I'd like to get my hair bleached."

  • So, what is bleached? Well, I have sort of brownish blonde hair.

  • Say if I want my hair to be very,

  • very, very blonde, so very light blonde,

  • that's bleaching your hair. So it's when your hair goes a lot lighter.

  • So I could say, "I'd like to get my hair bleached."

  • I could also say, "I'd like to get my hair dyed."

  • Colored and dyed are very similar things.

  • They both mean you want to change your hair color.

  • So I could say, "I'd like to get my hair dyed pink."

  • Do you guys think this would be a good idea? Or,

  • "I'd like to get my hair dyed black."

  • Okay, we've looked at perm already,

  • but we can add '-ed', because now we're talking about an adjective.

  • "I'd like to get my hair permed".

  • Again, I have straight hair.

  • I want my hair curly.

  • I could ask, "I'd like to get my hair permed."

  • "Streaked", "I'd like to get my hair streaked."

  • What does that mean?

  • Well, here is hair, and maybe I like my hair color,

  • but I also want some stripes in it.

  • So I might actually get black streaks.

  • So, some of my hair now is blonde,

  • and some of my hair is now black.

  • Or I might get blonde streaks,

  • which is just slightly lighter than the hair color I have on brown hair.

  • Okay, so "streaks" is kind of like "stripes",

  • where you have more than one color in your hair.

  • Okay? I could also say, "I'd like to get my hair styled."

  • Okay? So, maybe I'm in high school.

  • It's prom, the big dance, and I want my hair to get styled.

  • Maybe I want the hairdresser to make it curly,

  • but not permanent. I don't want it to stay curly for the next month.

  • I just want it curly tonight.

  • I could get my hair styled.

  • Okay? The next word, "straightened", my hair actually is curly and I straighten it,

  • meaning it goes from curly to straight.

  • So I could say, "I'd like to get my hair straightened.",

  • "I'd like to get my hair curled.",

  • which is the opposite, and finally,

  • "I'd like to get my hair layered."

  • So, I don't know if you know who Jennifer Aniston is,

  • but back in the 90s her hair was layered.

  • It's a very famous haircut, where her hair had multiple levels.

  • So, it wasn't straight across.

  • There was some hair that was cut to here,

  • some of it lower, some of it lower,

  • and some of it lower.

  • So those are layers. So what do all of these words have in common? If

  • we say, "I'd like to get my hair...",

  • except for "cut", these other ones,

  • they all have '-ed'. So, make a note about that.

  • So, I'd like to introduce you to my friend,

  • Mary. This is Mary. Right now she has no hair.

  • So, we're going to give her some different hair styles,

  • and also teach you some of this vocabulary.

  • The first hair style I'd like to put on Mary is an updo.

  • It's a small "u". Again, Mary can say,

  • "I'd like an updo". So what am I going to do? Well,

  • I'm going to put her hair up.

  • So maybe, in some sort of beautiful way,

  • there. So there are different types of updos.

  • Okay? Maybe I could have...

  • I don't know what hairstyle that is.

  • I've just created it. You can call this "the Emma",

  • but it's an updo. So, an updo is when your hair goes up.

  • It's not down. It's not relaxed.

  • Usually they have to spray a lot of hairspray in your hair to keep it

  • this way. So anytime your hair is up...

  • Usually we do this for weddings,

  • you get an updo, for prom,

  • for any type of formal event you may get an updo.

  • So now what should we give to Mary? Maybe we should give her some braids.

  • I'm just going to erase what we currently have.

  • So, I hope those of you watching can make out what these are.

  • I've given her two braids.

  • But braids are when you take a bunch of hair and you separate it into

  • three different parts, and you weave it together.

  • So some people have just one braid.

  • Maybe like, if you've seen the movie "Tomb Raider" with Angelina Jolie,

  • as Lara Croft, she has one braid in the back.

  • Some people have many, many, many braids.

  • Other times you get people like,

  • there's a book called "Heidi".

  • She has two braids. So these are braids.

  • Sometimes we have very nice braids,

  • where it's just one and it's in the back,

  • and we call that a French braid.

  • So these are different types of braids.

  • Okay, so now let's give Mary some pigtails.

  • Mary may be a little bit old for pigtails.

  • Usually we give children pigtails.

  • My little niece wears pigtails all the time.

  • But Mary, for some reason, she says,

  • "I'd like pigtails." Okay. So pigtails is when you have two ponytails,

  • which we'll get to in a second.

  • So these are pigtails. Now Mary wants a ponytail.

  • Okay, so there's Mary's ponytail.

  • I've done it to the side of the head.

  • Ponytails are often just to the back.

  • Unfortunately, I have quite short hair,

  • so I don't know how well you can see that,

  • but that would be a ponytail.

  • Just as a reminder, an updo,

  • so she can say, "I'd like an updo".

  • She could have braids, so no article there.

  • No article for pigtails. But here we have "a ponytail".

  • So what other styles can we do to Mary?

  • Well, what about dreads? So, dreads are similar to what - well,

  • they are what Bob Marley had.

  • I don't know if you guys listen to reggae,

  • but Bob Marley was a famous reggae musician.

  • It's pretty much when your hair -- how do I explain this? It's not soft

  • like this. It becomes kind of rough.

  • Just think Bob Marley. Or if you know what a Rastafarian is,

  • Rastafarian hair. So these would all be dark.

  • If you think of Jamaica, there are a lot of Jamaicans who have dreads.

  • So, there's Mary with her dreads.

  • Uh-oh. So now Mary wants to become different.

  • She doesn't want to live a normal life anymore.

  • She's decided she wants to go against the system.

  • So what does Mary do? She shaves her head.

  • So we get rid of all her hair.

  • She no longer has dreads.

  • So, there's Mary with a shaved head.

  • So, no more hair, she's shaved it all off.

  • But I don't know. I don't think Mary's going to get a lot of dates

  • this way. So what can we do to fix it? Well maybe she grows back

  • her hair, and maybe she has a very hot date.

  • I don't know how all this looks,

  • but... So we decide to give her a bun.

  • So what's a bun? A bun is usually seen at the back of the hair,

  • and it's kind of like a circle.

  • When you put your hair tightly in a circle at the back.

  • So in a lot of traditional Asian haircuts you would see a bun.

  • Now Mary wants to add something to the bun.

  • She likes the bun, but she wants something more.

  • So maybe she leaves out a little bit of hair,

  • and she curls it a little bit.

  • These are called ringlets. So Mary has a bun with ringlets.

  • Now Mary decides her hair is too short.

  • She wants long hair. Her hair is too short; maybe this is how long her

  • hair is. So what does she do? She gets hair extensions.

  • So this makes her hair longer.

  • So this part of her hair is not real; it's been woven into the short

  • hair she has. So hair extensions makes her hair longer.

  • So, here are some other words we can use when we're talking about Mary.

  • Maybe Mary wants to shorten her bangs.

  • So maybe these are her bangs,

  • so it's the part of your hair on your forehead.

  • I don't have bangs, but Mary has bangs,

  • and maybe she wants to get them cut.

  • She could ask the hairstylist, in this case me,

  • "Could you cut my bangs?" There,

  • I've cut her bangs. I'