Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I am a palliative care physician

    私は緩和ケア専門の医師です

  • and I would like to talk to you today about health care.

    今日は医療について お話ししたいと思います

  • I'd like to talk to you about the health and care

    お話ししたいのは我が国で もっとも弱い立場にある人々の

  • of the most vulnerable population in our country --

    健康と医療についてです

  • those people dealing with the most complex serious health issues.

    最も複雑で深刻な健康問題を 抱えている人々のことです

  • I'd like to talk to you about economics as well.

    経済の面も お話したいと思います

  • And the intersection of these two should scare the hell out of you --

    これら二つが絡み合うのは 非常に恐ろしいことでしょう

  • it scares the hell out of me.

    私にも非常に恐ろしいことです

  • I'd also like to talk to you about palliative medicine:

    緩和医療についても お話したいと思います

  • a paradigm of care for this population, grounded in what they value.

    それは人々の価値感に根差した ケアの枠組みについてです

  • Patient-centric care based on their values

    患者中心の医療とは 彼らの価値感に基づくものです

  • that helps this population live better and longer.

    人々がより良く より長く 生きる手助けをするものです

  • It's a care model that tells the truth

    このケアモデルは 真実を語るものであり

  • and engages one-on-one

    1対1で関わり合って

  • and meets people where they're at.

    彼らの生活する状態に合わせるものです

  • I'd like to start by telling the story of my very first patient.

    私がまさに初めて受け持った 患者さんの話から始めます

  • It was my first day as a physician,

    長い白衣を着た

  • with the long white coat ...

    医師としての初日でした

  • I stumbled into the hospital

    私が病院に出勤すると

  • and right away there's a gentleman, Harold, 68 years old,

    すぐにハロルドという 救急外来を訪れた 68才の男性に

  • came to the emergency department.

    お会いすることになりました

  • He had had headaches for about six weeks

    彼の頭痛は6週間続き

  • that got worse and worse and worse and worse.

    それは日に日に 悪化していました

  • Evaluation revealed he had cancer that had spread to his brain.

    検査の結果 彼の脳には がんが広がっていました

  • The attending physician directed me to go share with Harold and his family

    担当医が私に ハロルドと彼の家族の所に行って

  • the diagnosis, the prognosis and options of care.

    診断結果、予後とケアの選択肢を 伝えるように指示しました

  • Five hours into my new career,

    新しく仕事に就いて5時間後

  • I did the only thing I knew how.

    私は知っていた わずかな事を実行しました

  • I walked in,

    部屋に入って

  • sat down,

    腰を下ろして

  • took Harold's hand,

    ハロルドの手を取り

  • took his wife's hand

    彼の妻の手を取り

  • and just breathed.

    ただ息を吸い込みました

  • He said, "It's not good news is it, sonny?"

    「坊や 良い知らせではないね?」 と彼が言いました

  • I said, "No."

    「良くありません」と答えました

  • And so we talked and we listened and we shared.

    そして私たちは語り 聞き 分かち合いました

  • And after a while I said,

    しばらくして私は言いました

  • "Harold, what is it that has meaning to you?

    「ハロルド あなたにとって 意味あるものは何ですか?

  • What is it that you hold sacred?"

    あなたの大切な事は 何ですか?」と

  • And he said,

    彼は言いました

  • "My family."

    「家族です」

  • I said, "What do you want to do?"

    「何かしたいことは?」 と聞きました

  • He slapped me on the knee and said, "I want to go fishing."

    彼は私の膝を叩いて 「釣りに行きたい」と言いました

  • I said, "That, I know how to do."

    「じゃあ それ 行きましょう」と私

  • Harold went fishing the next day.

    ハロルドは翌日釣りに行き

  • He died a week later.

    一週間後に亡くなりました

  • As I've gone through my training in my career,

    臨床研修を受けている時に

  • I think back to Harold.

    ハロルドのことを振り返りました

  • And I think that this is a conversation

    こんなエピソードが

  • that happens far too infrequently.

    まったく少なすぎるのだと思います

  • And it's a conversation that had led us to crisis,

    危機的状況 すなわち 今日のアメリカ式生活に対する最大の脅威に

  • to the biggest threat to the American way of life today,

    繋がる話です

  • which is health care expenditures.

    それは医療費についてです

  • So what do we know?

    では分っている事は?

  • We know that this population, the most ill,

    もっとも重い病気にかかっている病人は

  • takes up 15 percent of the gross domestic product --

    国内総生産の 15%を使っている事が分かっています

  • nearly 2.3 trillion dollars.

    約234兆円です

  • So the sickest 15 percent take up 15 percent of the GDP.

    最も重病の15%が 国内総生産の15%を使っているのです

  • If we extrapolate this out over the next two decades

    これから20年の間に

  • with the growth of baby boomers,

    ベビーブーム世代の 高齢化と共に

  • at this rate it is 60 percent of the GDP.

    この割合はGDPの 60%になると推定されます

  • Sixty percent of the gross domestic product

    アメリカ合衆国の

  • of the United States of America --

    国内総生産の60%です

  • it has very little to do with health care at that point.

    その時点で 医療だけの問題ではなくなっています

  • It has to do with a gallon of milk,

    これは1ガロンのミルクや

  • with college tuition.

    大学の授業料に関係します

  • It has to do with every thing that we value

    私たちが価値を置く全ての事と

  • and every thing that we know presently.

    今知っている全ての事に 影響があります

  • It has at stake the free-market economy and capitalism

    アメリカ合衆国の 自由市場経済と資本主義が

  • of the United States of America.

    危機に瀕しているのです

  • Let's forget all the statistics for a minute, forget the numbers.

    さて 少しの間 統計の事は忘れましょう 数字は忘れて下さい

  • Let's talk about the value we get for all these dollars we spend.

    私たちが使うお金で得られる 価値のお話をしましょう

  • Well, the Dartmouth Atlas, about six years ago,

    約6年前に ダートマス・アトラスは

  • looked at every dollar spent by Medicare --

    メディケアが重篤な患者にかける

  • generally this population.

    全ての費用を調査しました

  • We found that those patients who have the highest per capita expenditures

    一人当たりの支出が 最も高い患者達では

  • had the highest suffering, pain, depression.

    苦痛、痛み、うつの症状が 最も多いという事が分りました

  • And, more often than not, they die sooner.

    そして 大抵の場合 死期が近いのです

  • How can this be?

    なぜこうなったのでしょうか?

  • We live in the United States,

    私たちは合衆国に住んでいます

  • it has the greatest health care system on the planet.

    ここには地球上 最も良い 医療制度があります

  • We spend 10 times more on these patients

    私たちはこうした患者に

  • than the second-leading country in the world.

    世界第2位の国と比べて10倍の 医療費を費やしています

  • That doesn't make sense.

    つじつまが合いません

  • But what we know is,

    でも 分っているのは

  • out of the top 50 countries on the planet

    組織化された医療制度のある

  • with organized health care systems,

    世界の上位50か国中では

  • we rank 37th.

    37位ということです

  • Former Eastern Bloc countries and sub-Saharan African countries

    かつての東側諸国と サハラ以南のアフリカ諸国は

  • rank higher than us as far as quality and value.

    質と価値では 我が国より 上位に格付けされています

  • Something I experience every day in my practice,

    病院で私は毎日経験しますが

  • and I'm sure, something many of you on your own journeys have experienced:

    皆さんも人生の中で 経験があるはずです

  • more is not more.

    多ければ良いというものではないのです

  • Those individuals who had more tests,

    沢山の検査を受けて

  • more bells, more whistles,

    沢山のあれこれ

  • more chemotherapy, more surgery, more whatever --

    沢山の化学療法と手術 何でも沢山

  • the more that we do to someone,

    患者に対して 沢山の事を行うと

  • it decreases the quality of their life.

    生活の質を落とし

  • And it shortens it, most often.

    ほとんどの場合 寿命を縮めてしまいます

  • So what are we going to do about this?

    では どうすれば 良いのでしょうか?

  • What are we doing about this?

    私たちは 何をしているのでしょうか?

  • And why is this so?

    なぜこうなるのでしょうか?

  • The grim reality, ladies and gentlemen,

    皆さん 厳しい現実として

  • is that we, the health care industry -- long white-coat physicians --

    医療業界や白衣の医師が 皆さんから奪い取っているのです

  • are stealing from you.

    医療業界や白衣の医師が 皆さんから奪い取っているのです

  • Stealing from you the opportunity

    いかにして あなたの人生を生きるかという

  • to choose how you want to live your lives

    選択の機会を 奪い取っているのです

  • in the context of whatever disease it is.

    それがどんな病気であってでもです

  • We focus on disease and pathology and surgery

    私たちは病気、病理学 手術、薬理学など

  • and pharmacology.

    個々の専門領域を重要視しています

  • We miss the human being.

    私たちは人間全体を見ていないのです

  • How can we treat this

    人間全体を理解することなく

  • without understanding this?

    どうやって 治療できるのでしょうか?

  • We do things to this;

    専門領域に焦点を当てますが

  • we need to do things for this.

    人間全体に対して行う必要があるのです

  • The triple aim of healthcare:

    医療の3つの目的は

  • one, improve patient experience.

    第一に 患者の日々の経験が向上すること

  • Two, improve the population health.

    第二に国民の健康

  • Three, decrease per capita expenditure across a continuum.

    第三に 一人当たりの 支出を全体的に削減すること

  • Our group, palliative care,

    私たち緩和ケアのグループは

  • in 2012, working with the sickest of the sick --

    2012年に 最も重篤な患者たちを担当しました

  • cancer,

    がん、心臓病、肺疾患 腎疾患、認知症です

  • heart disease, lung disease,

    患者の日々の経験を向上するために 何をしたのか

  • renal disease,

    「先生 家に帰りたいです」

  • dementia --

    「では往診をしましょう」

  • how did we improve patient experience?

    生活の質が改善されました

  • "I want to be at home, Doc."

    人について考えるのです

  • "OK, we'll bring the care to you."

    第二に 国民の健康

  • Quality of life, enhanced.

    どのように国民への見方を変えて

  • Think about the human being.

    異なるレベルで より深く関わり合い

  • Two: population health.

    自分自身よりも 広い意味で人間の根本に 結びつけたのでしょうか?

  • How did we look at this population differently,

    私たちの診察する外来患者の94%は

  • and engage with them at a different level, a deeper level,

    2012年には 通院の必要が無くなりました

  • and connect to a broader sense of the human condition than my own?

    どうして こんなことが出来たのでしょうか?

  • How do we manage this group,

    通院できなかったのではなく

  • so that of our outpatient population,

    通院の必要がなかったのです

  • 94 percent, in 2012, never had to go to the hospital?

    私たちが医療を届けたからです

  • Not because they couldn't.

    彼らの価値観と 生活の質を保ちました

  • But they didn't have to.

    第三に一人当たりの支出です

  • We brought the care to them.

    この患者群に対して

  • We maintained their value, their quality.

    現時点では約234兆円 20年でGDPの60%になるのです

  • Number three: per capita expenditures.

    私たちは医療支出を 70%近く削減しました

  • For this population,

    患者たちは 自らの価値に沿って 望むものは受け取り

  • that today is 2.3 trillion dollars and in 20 years is 60 percent of the GDP,

    よりよく生きて 長生きするのです

  • we reduced health care expenditures by nearly 70 percent.

    1/3の支出でです

  • They got more of what they wanted based on their values,

    ハロルドの余命は 限られていましたが

  • lived better and are living longer,

    緩和ケアには 時限がありません

  • for two-thirds less money.

    緩和ケアは診断から 最期の時までの枠組みです

  • While Harold's time was limited,

    数時間

  • palliative care's is not.

    数週間、数か月間、数年間

  • Palliative care is a paradigm from diagnosis through the end of life.

    ずっと続くのです

  • The hours,

    治療をしても しなくても

  • weeks, months, years,

    クリスティンです

  • across a continuum --

    ステージIIIの子宮頸がんを 患っていて

  • with treatment, without treatment.

    転移性のがんが 子宮頸部から始まり

  • Meet Christine.

    体全体に広がっています

  • Stage III cervical cancer,

    彼女は50代でご存命です

  • so, metastatic cancer that started in her cervix,

    これは人生の終わりではなく

  • spread throughout her body.

    人生についてです

  • She's in her 50s and she is living.

    老人だけの事ではなく

  • This is not about end of life,

    全ての人についてです

  • this is about life.

    リチャードです

  • This is not just about the elderly,

    末期の肺疾患を患っています

  • this is about people.

    「リチャード 大切な事は何ですか?」

  • This is Richard.

    「子供、妻、ハーレー」

  • End-stage lung disease.

    (笑)

  • "Richard, what is it that you hold sacred?"

    「良いですね!

  • "My kids, my wife and my Harley."

    私は自転車を漕ぐのがやっとだから あなたをハーレーに乗せて走れないけれど

  • (Laughter)

    できる事を考えましょう」

  • "Alright!

    私の所に来た時

  • I can't drive you around on it because I can barely pedal a bicycle,

    リチャードは悪い状態でした

  • but let's see what we can do."

    天からの小さな声が

  • Richard came to me,

    多分 余命は数週間か 数か月だと言っていました

  • and he was in rough shape.

    それから私たちは話しました

  • He had this little voice telling him

    じっくり話を聞くと

  • that maybe his time was weeks to months.

    大きな違いが現れます

  • And then we just talked.

    口だけでなく耳も使うのです

  • And I listened and tried to hear --

    「一日一日を大切にしましょう」 と私は言いました

  • big difference.

    私たちが 人生の各章で言うように

  • Use these in proportion to this.

    リチャードが日々過ごす場所で 診察をしました

  • I said, "Alright, let's take it one day at a time,"

    週に1、2回の電話なのですが

  • like we do in every other chapter of our life.

    末期の肺疾患の中で うまくやっています

  • And we have met Richard where Richard's at day-to-day.

    今や緩和医療は 高齢者だけでなく

  • And it's a phone call or two a week,

    中年だけでもなく

  • but he's thriving in the context of end-stage lung disease.

    皆の為にあります

  • Now, palliative medicine is not just for the elderly,

    私の友人のジョナサンです

  • it is not just for the middle-aged.

    光栄で喜ばしいことに

  • It is for everyone.

    ジョナサンとお父さんが 今日 来て下さいました

  • Meet my friend Jonathan.

    ジョナサンは20代で 数年前に知り合いました

  • We have the honor and pleasure

    転移性の精巣がんを患っていて

  • of Jonathan and his father joining us here today.

    脳に転移していました

  • Jonathan is in his 20s, and I met him several years ago.

    脳卒中を起こし

  • He was dealing with metastatic testicular cancer,

    脳の手術をし

  • spread to his brain.

    放射線と化学療法を 受けていました

  • He had a stroke,

    彼と家族に会って間もなく

  • he had brain surgery,

    骨髄移植まで 数週間の時期でした

  • radiation, chemotherapy.

    耳を傾け 話しこんでいくと

  • Upon meeting him and his family,

    彼らは言いました 「教えて下さい がんとは何ですか?」

  • he was a couple of weeks away from a bone marrow transplant,

    こんなに治療が進行しているのに

  • and in listening and engaging,

    何が相手なのかも理解していないとは

  • they said, "Help us understand -- what is cancer?"

    なぜ 何が相手なのかを理解させようとせずに

  • How did we get this far

    ここまで進んでしまったのか

  • without understanding what we're dealing with?

    それをして良いのか知っているべき 一個の人間を差し置いて

  • How did we get this far without empowering somebody

    さらに次の段階に進めていくとは どういう考えなのか

  • to know what it is they're dealing with,

    神だったら 何でもできることでしょうが

  • and then taking the next step and engaging in who they are as human beings

    神ならぬ我々です

  • to know if that is what we should do?

    鵜呑みにはしないで欲しいですが

  • Lord knows we can do any kind of thing to you.

    今日 緩和ケアを行うと

  • But should we?

    人々がより良く 長く生きることが 証明されています

  • And don't take my word for it.

    2010年の『ニューイングランド・ ジャーナル・オブ・メディスン』に

  • All the evidence that is related to palliative care these days

    画期的な論文が 掲載されました

  • demonstrates with absolute certainty people live better and live longer.

    ハーバードで私の友人であり 同僚が行った研究です

  • There was a seminal article out of the New England Journal of Medicine

    末期の肺がん患者を

  • in 2010.

    緩和ケアを受けるグループと

  • A study done at Harvard by friends of mine, colleagues.

    受けないグループに分けました

  • End-stage lung cancer:

    緩和ケアを受けたグループでは 痛みは少なく

  • one group with palliative care,

    うつも少なかった

  • a similar group without.

    入院の必要も少なく

  • The group with palliative care reported less pain,

    そして 皆さん

  • less depression.

    彼らは3~6か月長生きしました

  • They needed fewer hospitalizations.

    もし緩和ケアががん治療薬だったら

  • And, ladies and gentlemen,

    地球上全てのがん専門医が 処方箋を出すでしょう

  • they lived three to six months longer.

    なぜそうしないのでしょうか?

  • If palliative care were a cancer drug,

    繰り返しますが 私たち 愚かな長い白衣の医師たちは

  • every cancer doctor on the planet would write a prescription for it.

    狭い専門領域の治療を行う訓練を受け そう呪文を唱えます

  • Why don't they?

    人間全体を見る治療ではありません

  • Again, because we goofy, long white-coat physicians

    死の床はいつか私たち全員が 至る場所です

  • are trained and of the mantra of dealing with this,

    しかし今日のこの話は 死ぬ事についてではありません

  • not with this.

    生きる事についてです

  • This is a space that we will all come to at some point.

    私たちの価値観と

  • But this conversation today is not about dying,

    自分の大切な事に基づいて生き

  • it is about living.

    人生のページをどう描きたいか

  • Living based on our values,

    それが最終章かも

  • what we find sacred

    最後の5章かもしません

  • and how we want to write the chapters of our lives,

    分かっていること

  • whether it's the last

    証明されていることは

  • or the last five.

    こうした会話は 今日すべきなのです

  • What we know,

    翌週でなく 翌年でなく

  • what we have proven,

    危機にさらされているのは 今日の私たちの生活や

  • is that this conversation needs to happen today --

    年老いての生活

  • not next week, not next year.

    そして子供や孫の生活なのです

  • What is at stake is our lives today

    病室や

  • and the lives of us as we get older

    自宅のソファの上だけでなく

  • and the lives of our children and our grandchildren.

    全ての場所と目にする物です

  • Not just in that hospital room

    緩和医療がその答えです 人と向き合い

  • or on the couch at home,

    私たち全員が 直面するであろう人生を変え

  • but everywhere we go and everything we see.

    より良いものにするのです

  • Palliative medicine is the answer to engage with human beings,

    同僚へ

  • to change the journey that we will all face,

    患者へ

  • and change it for the better.

    政府へ

  • To my colleagues,

    全ての人たちへ

  • to my patients,

    ともに立ち上がり 声を上げて 可能な限り最高の医療を

  • to my government,

    求めようではありませんか

  • to all human beings,

    そうすれば より良い今日を過ごし

  • I ask that we stand and we shout and we demand

    より良い明日を 確かなものにできるのです

  • the best care possible,

    私たちは 今日を変える必要があります