Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • My name is Canwen, and I play both the piano and the violin.

    私の名前はカンウェンで、ピアノとバイオリンの両方を弾いています。

  • I aspire to some day be a doctor, and my favorite subject is calculus.

    いつかは医者になりたいと思っていて、好きな科目は微積分です。

  • My mom and dad are tiger parents,

    母と父は虎の親。

  • who won't let me go to sleepovers,

    お泊り会に行かせてくれない人

  • but they make up for it by serving my favorite meal every single day.

    しかし、彼らは毎日私の好きな食事を提供することで、それを補っています。

  • Rice.

    米だ

  • And I'm a really bad driver.

    そして、私は本当に運転が下手なんです。

  • So my question for you now is,

    それで今の質問は

  • "How long did it take you to figure out I was joking?"

    "How long did it take you to figure out I was joking?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • As you've probably guessed, today I am going to talk about race

    あなたはおそらく推測したように、今日私はレースについて話をしようとしています。

  • and I'll start off by sharing with you my story

    そして、私は私の物語を共有することから始めます。

  • of growing up Asian-American.

    アジア系アメリカ人として成長することの

  • I moved to the United States when I was two years old,

    2歳の時に渡米しました。

  • so almost my entire life has been a blend of two cultures.

    私の人生のほとんどは二つの文化が混ざり合っています。

  • I eat pasta with chopsticks.

    箸でパスタを食べています。

  • I'm addicted to orange chicken, and my childhood hero was Yao Ming.

    私はオレンジチキンにはまっていて、子供の頃のヒーローはヤオミンでした。

  • But having grown up in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Idaho,

    しかし、ノースダコタ、サウスダコタ、アイダホで育った。

  • all states with incredible little racial diversity,

    人種の多様性が信じられないほど少ない全州

  • it was difficult to reconcile my so-called exotic Chinese heritage

    吾輩には難儀だった

  • with my mainstream American self.

    主流のアメリカ人の自分と

  • Used to being the only Asian in the room,

    部屋にアジア人が一人しかいないことに慣れている。

  • I was self-conscious at the first thing people noticed about me

    最初に人に気づかれた時に自意識過剰になっていた

  • was, that I wasn't white.

    私は白人ではないということでした。

  • And as a child I quickly began to realize

    そして子供の頃、私はすぐに

  • that I had two options in front of me.

    私の目の前には2つの選択肢があったからです。

  • Conformed to the stereotype that was expected of me,

    私に期待されていた固定観念に合致していた。

  • or conformed to the whiteness that surrounded me.

    あるいは、私を取り囲む白さに適合していた。

  • There was no in between.

    間には何もありませんでした。

  • For me, this meant that I always felt self-conscious about being good at maths,

    私にとっては、数学が得意であることに常に自意識を持っていました。

  • because people would just say it was because I was Asian,

    私がアジア人だからって言われるからよ

  • not because I actually worked hard.

    実際に頑張ったからではありません。

  • It meant that whenever a boy asked me out,

    男の子に誘われた時のことを意味していました。

  • it was because he had the yellow fever,

    黄熱病を患っていたからです。

  • and not because he actually liked me.

    彼が実際に私を好きだったからではなく

  • It meant that for the longest time

    それは、長い間

  • my identity had formed around the fact that I was different.

    私のアイデンティティは、自分が違うという事実を中心に形成されていました。

  • And I thought that being Asian was the only special thing about me.

    アジア人であることだけが特別なんだと思ってた

  • These effects were emphasized by the places where I lived.

    これらの効果は、自分が住んでいた場所が強調されていました。

  • Don't get me wrong.

    誤解しないでください。

  • Only a small percentage of people were actually racist,

    実際に人種差別をしていたのはごく一部の人だけ。

  • or, even borderline racist,

    差別主義者の境界線上にある

  • but the vast majority were just a little bit clueless.

    が、大多数はちょっとしたことを知らないだけで

  • Now, I know you are probably thinking, "What's the difference?"

    今、私はあなたがおそらく考えている知っている、"What's the difference?

  • Well, here is an example.

    さて、ここで一例を紹介します。

  • Not racist can sound like, "I'm white and you're not."

    人種差別主義者ではないと、"I'm white and you're not.&quotのように聞こえることができます。

  • Racist can sound like,

    差別主義者に聞こえるかもしれません。

  • "I'm white, you're not, and that makes me better than you."

    "I'm white, you're not, and that makes me better than you.&quot.

  • But clueless sounds like,

    しかし、無知な音がする。

  • "I'm white, you're not, and I don't know how to deal with that."

    私は白人ですが、あなたは白人ではありません、そして私はそれに対処する方法を知りません。

  • Now, I don't doubt for a second

    疑うことはありません

  • that these clueless people are still nice individuals

    こういう無知な人たちはまだいい人たちだと

  • with great intentions.

    意思を持って

  • But they do ask some questions that become pretty annoying after a while.

    しかし、彼らはしばらくするとかなり迷惑になるような質問をしてきます。

  • Here are a few examples.

    いくつかの例をご紹介します。

  • "You're Chinese, oh my goodness, I have a Chinese friend, do you know him?"

    "You're Chinese, oh my goodness, I have Chinese friend, do you know him?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • "No.

    "No.

  • I don't know him.

    彼のことは知らない。

  • Because contrary to your unrealistic expectations,

    あなたの非現実的な期待に反して

  • I do not know every single one of the 1.35 billion Chinese people

    13.5億人の中国人を一人残らず知らない

  • who live on Planet Earth."

    惑星earth.&quotに住んでいる人。

  • People also tend to ask,

    人にも聞かれる傾向があります。

  • "Where does your name come from?",

    "あなたの名前はどこから来ているのですか?

  • and I really don't know how to answer that,

    それにどう答えたらいいのか本当にわからない。

  • so I usually stick with the truth.

    だから私はいつも真実にこだわる

  • "My parents gave it to me.

    "My parents gave it to me.

  • Where does your name come from?"

    あなたの名前はどこから来ていますか?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Don't even get me started

    Don't get me started

  • on how many times people have confused me with a different Asian person.

    何度も別のアジア人と混同されていることについて

  • One time someone came up to me and said,

    ある時、誰かが近寄ってきて言った。

  • "Angie, I love your art work!"

    "アンジー、私はあなたの芸術作品が大好きです! &quot.

  • And I was super confused,

    そして、私は超混乱していました。

  • so I just thanked them and walked away.

    だから、お礼を言って立ち去った。

  • But, out of all the questions

    しかし、すべての質問の中で

  • my favorite one is still the classic, "Where are you from?",

    私のお気に入りは、まだ古典的な、"Where are you from?

  • because I've lived in quite a few places,

    なぜなら、私はかなりの数の場所に住んでいたからです。

  • so this is how the conversation usually goes.

    ということで、普段はこんな感じで会話が進んでいます。

  • "Where are you from?"

    "あなたはどこから来たのですか?

  • "Oh, I am from Boise, Idaho."

    "Oh, I'm from Boise, Idaho.&quot.

  • "I see, but where are you really from?"

    "I see, but where are you really from?

  • "I mean, I lived in South Dakota for a while."

    "I mean, I lived in South Dakota for while.&quot.

  • "Okay, what about before that?"

    "Okay, what about about before that?

  • "I mean, I lived in North Dakota."

    "I mean, I lived in North Dakota.&quot.

  • "Okay, I'm just going to cut straight to the chase here,

    さて、本題に入りたいと思います。

  • I guess what I'm saying is,

    私が言いたいことは

  • have you ever lived anywhere far away from here,

    ここから遠く離れた場所に住んでいたことはありますか?

  • where people talk a little differently?"

    人々は少し違った話をするところ?

  • "Oh, I know where you talking about, yes I have, I used to live in Texas."

    "Oh, I know where you talking about, yes I have, I used to live in Texas.&quot.

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • By then, they usually have just given up and wonder to themselves

    それまでに、彼らは通常、単にあきらめて、自分自身に疑問を持っています。

  • why I'm not one of the cool Asians like Jeremy Lin or Jackie Chan,

    なぜ私はジェレミー・リンやジャッキー・チェンのようなクールなアジア人の一人ではないのか。

  • or they skip the needless banter and go straight for the,

    くだらない雑談は省いて、そのまま

  • "Where is your family from?"

    "あなたの家族はどこから来たのですか?

  • So, just an FYI for all of you out there, that is the safest strategy.

    だから、そこにいるすべてのあなたのための参考までに、それが最も安全な戦略です。

  • But, as amusing as these interactions were,

    しかし、これらの相互作用は面白かった。

  • oftentimes they made me want to reject my own culture,

    自分の文化を拒絶したくなることもしばしばありました。

  • because I thought it helped me conform.

    私はそれが私の適合を助けると思ったからです。

  • I distanced myself from the Asian stereotype

    アジアのステレオタイプから距離を置いた

  • as much as possible, by degrading my own race,

    できるだけ自分の人種を落とすことで

  • and pretending I hated math.

    と数学が嫌いなふりをしていました。

  • And the worse part was, it worked.

    もっと悪いのは、それが効いたことだ。

  • The more I rejected my Chinese identity, the more popular I became.

    中国人であることを否定すればするほど、人気者になっていった。

  • My peers liked me more, because I was more similar to them.

    同級生の方が私のことを好きだったのは、私の方が似ていたからです。

  • I became more confident, because I knew I was more similar to them.

    自分の方が似ていることを知って、自信が持てるようになった。

  • But as I became more Americanized,

    しかし、アメリカナイズされていくうちに

  • I also began to lose bits and pieces of myself,

    また、自分自身の欠片も失い始めました。

  • parts of me that I can never get back,

    取り返しのつかない部分があります。

  • and no matter how much I tried to pretend

    どんなにふりをしようとしても

  • that I was the same as my American classmates,

    アメリカ人の同級生と同じであることを

  • I wasn't.

    していませんでした。

  • Because for people who have lived in the places where I lived,

    なぜなら、自分が住んでいた場所に住んでいた人にとっては

  • white is the norm, and for me, white became the norm too.

    白が当たり前、私にとっても白が当たり前になった。

  • For my fourteenth birthday, I received the video game The Sims 3,

    14歳の誕生日には、ビデオゲーム「ザ・シムズ3」を受け取りました。

  • which lets you create your own characters and control their lives.

    自分でキャラクターを作成して、その人の人生をコントロールすることができます。

  • My fourteen-year-old self created the perfect little mainstream family,

    14歳の自分が、完璧な小さな主流家庭を作った。

  • complete with a huge mansion and an enormous swimming pool.

    巨大な邸宅と巨大なプールが完備されています。

  • I binge-played the game for about three months,

    3ヶ月くらいゲームをビンゴしてました。

  • then put it away and never really thought about it again,

    その後、それを片付けて、二度と考えたことはありませんでした。

  • until a few weeks ago,

    数週間前までは

  • when I came to a sudden realization.

    ふと気がついた時に

  • The family, that I had custom-designed, was white.

    カスタムしていた家族は白でした。

  • The character that I had designed for myself, was white.

    自分でデザインしたキャラが白かった。

  • Everyone I had designed was white.

    私がデザインした人はみんな白人でした。

  • And the worst part was,

    そして最悪だったのは

  • this was by no means a conscious decision that I had made.

    これは決して意識して決めたことではありません。

  • Never once did I think to myself

    一度も思ったことはない

  • that I could actually make the characters look like me.

    実際に自分のようなキャラクターにすることができたこと。

  • Without even thinking, white had become my norm too.

    何も考えずに、白も自分の規範になっていた。

  • The truth is,

    真実は

  • Asian Americans play a strange role in the American melting pot.

    アジア系アメリカ人は、アメリカのるつぼの中で奇妙な役割を果たしている。

  • We are the model minority.

    私たちはモデルのマイノリティです。

  • Society uses our success to pit us against other people of color

    社会は人の成功を利用して有色人種を貶める

  • as justification that racism doesn't exist.

    人種差別が存在しないことを正当化するために

  • But was does that mean for us, Asian Americans?

    しかし、それは私たちアジア系アメリカ人にとって意味があったのでしょうか?

  • It means that we are not quite similar enough to be accepted,

    受け入れられるほど似ていないということです。

  • but we aren't different enough to be loathed.

    しかし、私たちは嫌われるほどの違いではありません。

  • We are in a perpetually grey zone,

    私たちは永遠にグレーゾーンにいる。

  • and society isn't quite sure what to do with us.

    そして社会は私たちと何をすべきなのかよくわかっていません。

  • So they group us by the color of our skin.

    肌の色でグループ分けされているんですね。

  • They tell us that we must reject our own heritages,

    自分たちの遺産を拒否しなければならないと教えてくれています。

  • so we can fit in with the crowd.

    群衆の中に溶け込めるように

  • They tell us that our foreignness

    彼らは私たちの外国人性を教えてくれます

  • is the only identifying characteristic of us.

    は、私たちの唯一の識別特性です。

  • They strip away our identities one by one,

    彼らは私たちのアイデンティティを一つ一つ剥ぎ取っていく。

  • until we are foreign, but not quite foreign,

    私たちが外国人ではなく、外国人になるまで

  • American but not quite American,

    アメリカ人だけど、アメリカ人とは思えない。

  • individual,

    個人の方。

  • but only when there are no other people from our native country around.

    周りに祖国の人がいない場合に限ります。

  • I wish that I had always had the courage to speak out about these issues.

    このような問題について、常に勇気を持って発言していたらいいなと思いました。

  • But coming from one culture that avoids confrontation,

    しかし、対立を避ける一つの文化から来ている。

  • and another that is divided over race,

    そして、人種をめぐって分断されている別のもの。

  • how do I overcome the pressure to keep the peace,

    平和を守るためのプレッシャーにどうやって打ち勝つか。

  • while also staying true to who I am?

    私が何者であるかに忠実でありながら

  • And as much as I hate to admit it, often times I don't speak out,

    そして、私はそれを認めるのが嫌なのですが、多くの場合、私は発言しないことがあります。

  • because, if I do,

    なぜなら、もしそうなら

  • it's at the the risk of being told that I am too sensitive,

    それは私が敏感すぎると言われる危険性があるからです。

  • or that I get offended too easily,

    とか、すぐに怒られてしまうとか。

  • or that it's just not worth it.

    または、それはそれだけの価値がないということです。

  • But I would point, are people willing to admit that?

    しかし、私が指摘するのは、人々はそれを認めることを望んでいるのか?

  • Yes, race issues are controversial.

    そう、人種問題は物議を醸している。

  • But that's precisely the reason why we need to talk about them.

    しかし、だからこそ、私たちはそれらについて話をする必要があるのです。

  • I just turned eighteen,

    私は18歳になったばかり。

  • and there are still so many things that I don't know about the world.

    と、まだまだ知らないことがたくさんあります。

  • But what I do know is that it's hard to admit

    しかし、私が知っているのは、それを認めるのは難しいということです。

  • that you might be part of the problem,

    あなたが問題の一端を担っているかもしれないと

  • that, all of us might be part of the problem.

    私たち全員が問題の一部なのかもしれません。

  • So, instead of giving you a step-by-step guide

    ということで、ステップバイステップの案内をするのではなく

  • on how to not be racist towards Asians,

    アジア人に対して人種差別的にならない方法について。

  • I will let you decide what to take from this talk.

    このトークから何を取るかは、あなたにお任せします。

  • All I can do,

    私にできることは

  • is share my story.

    は私の物語を共有しています。

  • My name is Canwen, my favorite color is purple.

    私の名前はカンウェン、好きな色は紫です。

  • And I play the piano, but not so much the violin.

    そして、私はピアノを弾きますが、バイオリンはあまり弾きません。

  • I have two incredibly supportive, hardworking parents,

    私には、信じられないほど応援してくれる、頑張り屋の両親が二人います。

  • and one very awesome ten-year-old brother.

    と、とてもすごい10歳のお兄さんが一人。

  • I love calculus more than anything,

    私は何よりも微積分が大好きです。

  • despise eating rice, and I'm a horrendous driver.

    ご飯を食べるのを軽蔑しているし、運転も下手くそなんです。

  • But most of all, I am proud of who I am.

    でも、何よりも自分のことを誇りに思っています。

  • A little bit American,

    ちょっとアメリカンな感じ。

  • a little bit Chinese,

    中国人が少し

  • and a whole lot of both.

    と、両方の全体的な

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

My name is Canwen, and I play both the piano and the violin.

私の名前はカンウェンで、ピアノとバイオリンの両方を弾いています。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 アジア 人種 差別 アメリカ 白人 認める

TEDx】私はあなたのアジア人ではありません|カンウェン・シュー|TEDxBoise

  • 3442 196
    林靜如 に公開 2017 年 04 月 07 日
動画の中の単語