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  • We've already brought you a sensational set of fan theories that could change how you

  • view your favorite movies, and now we're back for the sequel! Due to popular demand, we've

  • brought you five more crazy-but-kinda-plausible movie theories. This time, theyre picked

  • by you, straight from the YouTube comments of our last film theories video.

  • The Shining is Kubrick's apology for staging the Lunar Landing

  • Break out the tin foil hats for this one. In 1969, the United States sent some guys

  • to the moon. It was a pretty big deal, and it was broadcast on TV, live, around the world.

  • The whole thing was a feat of technology and science the likes of which the world had never

  • seen.

  • Or was it?

  • A certain group of people believe that it never happened, and that director Stanley

  • Kubrick staged the whole thing using cinema magic. And all of this hinges upon The Shining,

  • and young Danny Torrance's discovery of Room 237—supposedly the most evil and heavily

  • haunted room in the Overlook Hotel.

  • At one point, Danny is seen playing with his toys in a hallway with a unique carpet design,

  • not seen anywhere else in the Overlook. According to the theory, this pattern reflects the shape

  • of an aerial view of a NASA shuttle launch site. Danny then rises to his feet, symbolizing

  • the Apollo 11 rocket on his sweater lifting off.

  • He proceeds to Room 237, which was originally Room 217 in the original Stephen King novel.

  • Why the change? During the time of the movie's filming, the Earth was believed to be approximately

  • 237,000 miles from the moon. This distance regularly fluctuates due to orbit and actually

  • averages out to 238,855 miles, but who cares? It's a 1980 horror movie.

  • There's also a scene showing Danny and his mother watching a TV that is visibly not hooked

  • into anything. Allegedly, this illustrates that what people watched on the television

  • during Armstrong's famous leap was all fake. When Danny's father, Jack Torrance, investigates

  • Room 237 after Danny is spooked, he finds a beautiful naked woman and embraces her.

  • To Jack's dismay, the woman transforms into a decaying older woman. Is Kubrick admitting

  • that he was happy to take a well-paying job to stage the lunar landing until he realized

  • what a deceptive thing it really was?

  • Or...maybe people just need to get out more.

  • There's an entire documentary dedicated to breaking down a lot of Kubrick's subliminal

  • messages hidden throughout The Shining. The documentary's name? Room 237.

  • Signs was about demons

  • Remember the whole alien invasion thing that made up most of the plot of Signs? Well, what

  • if they weren't really aliens? What if they were demons? According to a theory first published

  • on Reddit, it could be the case.

  • First, the "alien invasion" results in hundreds of thousands of people fleeing to temples,

  • churches, and other religious buildings for safety. Are these proper shelters, or a safe

  • place to hide with demons roaming around?

  • Second, we barely see any alien technology, except for a few lights in the sky. Third,

  • if these "aliens" can travel through space, it stands to reason they'd be smart enough

  • to realize they were allergic to water. Especially on a planet whose surface is covered with

  • it.

  • The alienwe mean demon at the end of the movie isn't hurt by H2O alone, but because

  • the water is blessed. Throughout the movie, Mel Gibson's daughter would regularly get

  • a full glass of water, sip it, put it down, and get a new glass. Half-full glasses litter

  • the house. When Gibson speaks of the day she was born, he describes her birth as holy,

  • even saying that everyone who saw her that day thought she was an angel. This divine

  • description transfers to her blessing every half-filled cup left throughout the house,

  • effectively leaving holy water all over the place. It's not like the rest of the world

  • chased off an alien invasion with a bunch of Super Soakers.

  • Mad Max is Death

  • Redditor EldarCorsair posted an awesome breakdown of Mad Max: Fury Road, which argues that each

  • of the three major warlords in the movie represent one of the Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Warlord

  • Immortan Joe is Pestilence. His people are sick due to the nuclear fallout throughout

  • the land. Joe rules the population by offering them small amounts of water, as if he has

  • the key to healing them.

  • The second Horseman, War, would be another warlord, the Bullet Farmer. You know, the

  • guy firing wildly into the dark when the tanker was stuck in the mud. The third Horseman,

  • Famine, would be the warlord known as the People Eater, since he's huge and represents

  • the gluttony of the rich. These guys trade food, drink, and weaponry among one another

  • in order to ensure their rule on this apocalyptic wasteland.

  • And the fourth Horseman, Death? That's Max. Think about it: Max brings death wherever

  • he goes across the wasteland, and he's haunted by the deaths of everyone he wasn't able to

  • save. In his first scene, he brings death to a lizard-like creature by eating it. Death

  • was on Furiosa's side, and her mission was ultimately a success. Remember when Max walks

  • off into the darkness to take on the Bullet Farmer's heavily armed vehicle? He destroys

  • the whole thing by himself off-screen, kills all the men on board, and hauls away all their

  • stuff. You don't even see what happens, you just assume that Max killed them all, like

  • he always does. It proves Max/Death is a constant, inexorable force of nature.

  • Jar Jar Binks is a Sith Lord

  • Out of all the movie theories mentioned in response to our previous video, Darth Jar

  • Jar was the most frequently requested by far. As crazy as it sounds, lots of people believe

  • that the bumbling Gungan we met on Naboo back in The Phantom Menace is actually the most

  • powerful Sith Lord in the universe.

  • Think about this: young Anakin Skywalker was able to escape just about every event unscathed

  • due to his natural aptitude for the Force. Jar Jar was also unharmed during the battle

  • between the Gungans and the Trade Federation. Don't let his goofy demeanor trick you. Remember,

  • Yoda was originally introduced as just a silly, swamp-dwelling creature on Dagobah before

  • turning out to be an old Jedi Master.

  • Jar Jar can also be seen using a "wave motion" that usually accompanies the Jedi mind trick

  • during various parts of Episode I when speaking to important characters. He apparently uses

  • this while persuading the entire Senate to grant full control and emergency power to

  • Supreme Chancellor Palpatine...and it works. This action puts Palpatine in the perfect

  • position to control everything and rise to power as Emperor. Even when Qui-Gon Jinn mentions

  • using the Force to guide him underneath the waters of Naboo, Jar Jar scoffs at the concept.

  • Don't forget, Palpatine and Jar Jar Binks are both from Naboo and they could have met

  • each other decades earlier. At Qui-Gon's funeral at the end of The Phantom Menace, Jar Jar

  • is standing right beside Palpatine, which starts a recurring theme of them being seen

  • together. In the beginning of Episode III, you can see Jar Jar and Palpatine walking

  • close to one another.

  • Binks also senses Anakin and Obi-Wan's arrival at the beginning of Episode II. He approaches

  • the elevator for no reason and doesn't attempt to open the door. He just waits a second or

  • two, knowing that they are coming, but still acts surprised to see them once the door opens

  • in order to maintain his cover. Maybe Jar Jar's almost too-obvious clumsiness wasn't

  • why he was banned from the underwater Gungan city, and why they treated him like a threat

  • when he arrived. Maybe Supreme Leader Snoke is a front and Jar Jar Binks still continues

  • to pull the strings of the Dark Side.

  • And now, for one more long-time theory that was actually proven to be true...

  • Deckard is a Replicant

  • Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi neo-noir classic Blade Runner is all about androids. These

  • androids, also known as replicants, look and think like humans, and possess self-awareness.

  • All that, and they're mainly used for dangerous grunt work on off-planet colonies. Some of

  • them try to abandon their hazardous work and hide on Earth. These escapees are tracked

  • by Blade Runners, a group of special police operatives who find and execute errant replicants.

  • Blade Runner Rick Deckard, played by Harrison Ford, is responsible for eliminating a group

  • of rogue replicants. It’s a quest that leaves him questioning his duties as he struggles

  • with the idea that many of these replicants just want to live. One replicant he meets

  • during his investigation even believes she is actually human.

  • The idea that Deckard himself is a replicant has been debated for years. Harrison Ford

  • claims that he was playing a human character. According to BBC News, Ford mentioned that

  • he and the director had talks about Deckard being a replicant, and that they both agreed

  • he was human during filming. But in subsequent interviews over the years, Ridley Scott has

  • said otherwise:

  • "He's a replicant."

  • Perhaps Scott lied to Ford to make his performance much more convincing.

  • Thanks for watching! Subscribe to our YouTube channel to watch more videos like the one

  • you just saw. And leave us a comment to let us know if there are any more fan theories

  • you’d like to see explored...

We've already brought you a sensational set of fan theories that could change how you

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5 More Film Theories That Change Everything

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    titan112   に公開 2017 年 04 月 03 日
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