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  • That religion is just absolutely uncalled for.

  • We are just mere things floating on a rock in space.

  • (Neil deGrasse Tyson) We are not only figuratively, but literally stardust.

  • You don't have to go to church on Christmas,

  • and it is about being good,

  • and that's what all religions are about anyway.

  • (Ray Comfort) Are you an atheist?

  • Yeah.

  • - Gonna kill yourself? - Yeah, I'd like to.

  • - So, you're an atheist? - Yes.

  • I need to know what to believe in.

  • (Stephen Colbert) Like, what happens when you die?

  • Yes, I don't want to be a bag of dust.

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  • (Ray Comfort) David, are you an atheist?

  • Yes.

  • (Ray Comfort) When did you become an atheist?

  • Around age 12.

  • Believing in God makes no sense.

  • To me, it's the dumbest thing.

  • It's for people who can't accept the fact that they're going

  • to die and rot in the ground like I'm going to do,

  • and it gives them some relief from that thought,

  • because that's not the nicest thought in the world.

  • (Ray Comfort) Are you an atheist?

  • Yes.

  • - Yes, I am. - Yes.

  • - Yes. - Yes, sir.

  • - Are you an atheist? - I am.

  • - Yeah, I'm an atheist. - Yes, I am.

  • (Ray Comfort) Alex, do you believe in God's existence?

  • No, I do not.

  • (Ray Comfort) How long have you been an atheist?

  • I would say probably since I was about 15 years old.

  • (Ray Comfort) So, you don't believe in the existence of God?

  • No, not really.

  • (Ray Comfort) What happened when you were 15?

  • I started questioning things, and I really just started

  • to think about the logic behind everything.

  • For the most part, we are not shown the evidence

  • for there being a higher power.

  • If we were, I almost guarantee that almost every atheist

  • would immediately agree to there being a higher power.

  • (Ray Comfort) Are you atheists?

  • - Yes. - Yes.

  • (Ray Comfort) Why?

  • Well, I just haven't seen enough evidence I suppose.

  • I grew up in a Christian family

  • and, just over the few years during high school

  • and as I grew up,

  • I just realized that there wasn't a lot of evidence

  • to support that belief system.

  • (Ray Comfort) Are you open to evidence?

  • I think I am open to evidence.

  • It just would have to be extraordinarily compelling,

  • like out of this world compelling.

  • (Ray Comfort) If you could be given evidence, reasonable evidence,

  • would you listen to it?

  • Yeah, I would.

  • (Ray Comfort) You're someone who has no faith or no belief

  • in a higher power or a creator, but if you were shown evidence,

  • you would change your mind, because you're open.

  • Absolutely.

  • (Ray Comfort) Flick through the pages of the book

  • I just put on your lap.

  • Look at the color pictures and I'll ask you a question.

  • Do you believe that book could happen by accident?

  • That nothing produced the color pictures in the book?

  • That red, orange, yellow, green, blue,

  • indigo, violet ink fell from the sky

  • and formed itself into those beautiful pictures,

  • and then black ink fell from the sky, or from nowhere,

  • and formed itself into coherent words,

  • and sentences, capitals, and periods,

  • and commas, making sense?

  • Page numbers fell from the sky, all in order,

  • and then it bound itself and formed itself

  • into a cover without work?

  • And there we have a book.

  • Obviously, intelligent design designed the book.

  • - Wouldn't that be correct? - Yeah.

  • (Ray Comfort) Can you see where I'm going with this?

  • Yeah.

  • (Ray Comfort) Tell me, what is DNA?

  • (female) What is it, Deoxyribonucleic acid?

  • And it's what makes up our bodies, and our cells,

  • and everything that makes us who we are.

  • DNA is like our biological code,

  • kind of like binary zeros and ones.

  • Information about us, who we are, what makes us us,

  • parts of us, how we look, how we're built,

  • everything like that.

  • (Ray Comfort) Your genes instructed your cells how to make your eyes,

  • and what color your eyes should be

  • and your hair and your height and your personality.

  • Scientists call it the instruction book for life.

  • Basically.

  • (Joe Hanson) Everything that you are or ever will be made of

  • starts as a tiny book of instructions

  • found in each and every cell.

  • Every time your body wants to make something,

  • it goes back to the instruction book,

  • looks it up, and puts it together.

  • The book of you would have 46 chapters,

  • 1 for each chromosome.

  • Each of our books' 46 chapters

  • is between 48 and 250 million letters long.

  • That's 3.2 billion letters total.

  • This is the secret language of DNA.

  • This is the book of life.

  • - Instruction book for life. - Yes.

  • - Instruction book for life. - Yes.

  • (Ray Comfort) DNA is made up of genes, and genes give instructions

  • to the cells as to how your body should grow.

  • Did you know that if those instructions,

  • the instruction book of your DNA, just your DNA,

  • was laid out end for end,

  • it would go to the sun and back a number of times.

  • That book of instructions is so comprehensive.

  • DNA is the genetic information encoded in the cell

  • of every living thing that instructs our cells

  • how to grow and how to function.

  • It's our genes that determine

  • whether our skin will be dark or light;

  • have brown or blue eyes, or red, or green, or yellow;

  • have red hair, be brunette, or blonde;

  • be tall or not so tall;

  • or the color of our feathers if we're a bird.

  • Whether we're humans, fish, animals, insects, or plant life,

  • the way our bodies look and operate has all been pre-written

  • in the amazing book of our DNA.

  • (Ray Comfort) What do you think of the mentality of someone

  • who believes a book fell together without a book maker?

  • Well, they would be crazy.

  • (Ray Comfort) Do you think a book could make itself?

  • No, I don't.

  • Of course not.

  • No.

  • - Utterly impossible. - Yes.

  • Anything could happen by accident.

  • (Ray Comfort) I mean, from nothing.

  • Um, wow.

  • - Couldn't happen, could it? - I don't think so.

  • (Ray Comfort) That'd be impossible.

  • It would be like saying an explosion caused everything

  • that makes a 747 airplane

  • to all just come together by accident

  • without some intelligent thought behind it.

  • (Ray Comfort) That's a good point.

  • (Ray Comfort) Do you believe DNA happened by accident?

  • No, I think that it developed over the course of many,

  • many millennia of evolution and development.

  • (Ray Comfort) DNA exists in every living thing.

  • Its origins don't matter.

  • The fact that there is intelligent information

  • tells us there must be an intelligent designer.

  • Is this making you think?

  • It is, and I do think about it from time to time.

  • It's just--yeah, it's complicated, definitely.

  • (Ray Comfort) Well, DNA's complicated,

  • but the point I'm trying to make is very simple.

  • Book, book designer or book maker.

  • DNA, intelligent designer, God.

  • - Does that make sense? - Yes.

  • - Are you an atheist? - I am.

  • (Ray Comfort) What would you think of the mentality of someone

  • who thought a physical book could make itself?

  • I think they'd be silly.

  • Of course it can't make itself.

  • (Ray Comfort) What would you think of the mentality

  • of someone who believed the instruction book for life,

  • DNA, made itself?

  • Well, I think it'd be silly as well.

  • It would need investigation.

  • (Ray Comfort) That's atheism.

  • Absolutely.

  • (Ray Comfort) And what would you think of the intelligence of someone

  • who believed the instruction book for life made itself?

  • Low. Low intelligence level.

  • DNA happened by accident?

  • Probably not too smart.

  • (Ray Comfort) DNA couldn't make itself. It's impossible.

  • - Does that make sense? - Yes.

  • - Is this making you think? - Yes.

  • (Ray Comfort) And what would think of the person who believed that DNA,

  • the instruction book for life, happened by accident?

  • 'Cause we're not just talking about human beings,

  • we're talking about every form of life:

  • fleas, cats, dogs, elephants, cows, horses, trees, plants.

  • Everything has DNA, the instruction book for life,

  • which makes the book in your hand

  • just seem feeble compared to the infinite intelligence that

  • must have put the instruction book for life together.

  • Can you see what I'm saying?

  • Yeah.

  • (Ray Comfort) Do you believe DNA happened by accident?

  • I believe it could.

  • (Ray Comfort) Explain it to me, how a program could make itself

  • out of nothing on how to make a human eye, giraffe's eyes,

  • elephant's eyes, cats, dogs, puppies, flowers, birds, trees.

  • Every living thing has DNA that's so complex,

  • it's mind-boggling.

  • There must have been a genius beyond any human reasoning

  • that put it together.

  • And to say it happened by chance is infinitely sillier

  • than saying a physical book happened by chance.

  • All I'm doing is reasoning with you.

  • I'm not--I don't want to win an argument.

  • I'm just saying I want you to concede something

  • that's absolutely common sense.

  • You're an atheist, so you believe

  • the scientific impossibility that nothing created everything?

  • I mean, it can't be nothing.

  • We all have to start from some point.

  • I wouldn't say nothing created it.

  • There had to be something there in the beginning.

  • (Ray Comfort) You like Richard Dawkins, don't you?

  • Well, I mean, you know, yeah, I like him.

  • (Ray Comfort) Do you believe nothing created everything,

  • a scientific impossibility, which is what he believes?

  • (Ray Comfort) You don't believe in a creator of all things?

  • If he says that, I think it's a very strange thing to say.

  • (Ray Comfort) Well, he says it.

  • It's insane.

  • Nothing can create anything, 'cause it's nothing.

  • There has to be something in the beginning.

  • Nowhere in our history of human reality

  • has something kind of just appeared out of nowhere.

  • (Ray Comfort) Do you believe that nothing created everything?

  • No, because nothing can't perform actions.

  • That makes no sense.

  • (Ray Comfort) It's a default position.

  • If you're saying nothing created everything,

  • then you're agreeing with Richard Dawkins.

  • You're mischaracterizing Richard Dawkins,

  • because Richard Dawkins, I'm sure he didn't say that.

  • That seems ridiculous.

  • (Ray Comfort) Professor Richard Dawkins, arguably the world's

  • most high-profile atheist, believes that in the beginning

  • there was nothing, and that nothing created everything.

  • As he attempts to justify this belief,

  • admitting that it defies common sense,

  • the learned professor calls nothing something.

  • Watch the reaction of his audience.

  • Of course it's counter-intuitive

  • that you can get something from nothing.

  • Of course common sense doesn't allow you

  • to get something from nothing.

  • That's why it's interesting.

  • It's got to be interesting in order to give rise

  • to the universe at all.

  • Something pretty mysterious had to give rise

  • to the origin of the universe.

  • But exactly what's meant by nothing,

  • but whatever it is, it's very, very simple.

  • [audience laughing]

  • (Richard Dawkins) Why is that funny?

  • (George Pell) Well, I think it's a bit funny to be trying to define nothing.

  • Richard Dawkins, I'm sure he didn't say that.