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  • Hi there.

  • Good evening, it's very nice to be here...that sort of thing.

  • I..I'm sorry.

  • Who are you?

  • I'm here to do the received pronunciation, the RP posh accent.

  • I believe you must be mistaken, I'm here to do the RP accent.

  • Oh, certainly we can work together.

  • I don't mind.

  • If...if it's okay with you.

  • Very well, if we must...

  • Okay!

  • Well, I suppose I'll represent the more modern RP,

  • basically people who wish to show a level of intelligence or class in their speech

  • will generally speak as I do.

  • And I suppose you represent the more archaic, old-fashioned RP?

  • Old-fashioned!? I shall wash your mouth up with soap and water!

  • Yes...well...

  • Perhaps you should begin by telling them what RP is and is not.

  • Okay, well, RP goes by many different names:

  • Standard English

  • Oxford English

  • The Queen's English

  • BBC English

  • Well, it is true, in the past,

  • BBC news reporters were expected to speak in a similiar style to the Queen.

  • They'd speak very upper class.

  • For example:

  • Good evening!

  • We interrupt this program to bring you a special news bulletin.

  • The Germans have bombarded British shores from the air.

  • Our American allies are here to lend a helping hand.

  • Lovely.

  • Thank you.

  • Whereas today's BBC represents a more realistic range of British accents.

  • Today, modern RP isn't exactly a very specific way of speaking.

  • Think of Tom Hiddleston,

  • Hugh Grant,

  • Keira Knightley,

  • Emma Watson,

  • Stephen Fry.

  • They're all on the spectrum of RP but the way they speak isn't exactly identical to one another.

  • The main idea of RP today is using good enunciation,

  • a wide range of vocabulary,

  • and just generally using the correct grammar.

  • Unlike those bloody Kardashians who really leave a great deal to be desired in that department,

  • they may have rather splendid rear ends...

  • - But

  • Bottom of the barrel, I say.

  • Yes, I mean...

  • I...I...I...I

  • I bet they sat at the rear of the class.

  • In fact, I bet they were kept behind after school, ay?

  • I should say.

  • Yes, indeed.

  • Are you finished?

  • Sorry, yes.

  • Indeed! Let's begin with the sounds.

  • We'll show you the differences between the more modern RP and the older-fashioned upper RP.

  • Modern RP is more just about proper enunciation,

  • good full articulation of consonants,

  • good pronunciation of consonants,

  • especially Ts, for example.

  • Try not use glottal T wherever possible.

  • For example,

  • "water", not "wa'er";

  • "better", not be'er.

  • However, when there's a T sound at the end of the word,

  • sometimes we don't say it.

  • For example,

  • absolutely,

  • definitely,

  • United States.

  • In regular RP, we use something called "R linking" or "R joining."

  • In a sentence such as this:

  • "India and China"

  • India ends with an "A" sound, the next word begins with an "A" sound,

  • so in regular RP we join them with an "R."

  • For example:

  • "India (r) and China"

  • Whereas in upper RP,

  • you wouldn't do that.

  • "India and China"

  • One important thing to note is RP is non-rhotic,

  • which means we don't pronunce the "R" sound.

  • For example, in this word,

  • Americans might pronounce it "hard", with an "R" sound.

  • But in RP we don't.

  • We pronounce it /ha:d/.

  • One important thing to remember is in these words that "A" is pronounced as an /a:/.

  • Class, task, ask, grass.

  • Whereas in these words, the "A" sound is pronounced like an /æ/.

  • Man, can, hand, maths.

  • The sounds in more common English accents come in more further back in the mouth,

  • as Jason Statham pointed out in his video.

  • Whereas in RP and upper RP, the sounds come from further forward in the mouth.

  • The rule is this:

  • the higher level the RP, the posher the accent,

  • the further forward in the mouth is where the sound would come from.

  • In upper RP, the jaw will move as little as possible.

  • think Keira Knightley!

  • She speaks with a very good posh accent,

  • but she looks like a ventriloquist dummy when she speaks because her mouth barely moves.

  • And that all lands to make a sound posher.

  • So I think that's probably...

  • Oh we have time for it, isn't it? You probably have to be somewhere?

  • Yes, I gotta be going.

  • Ehh, I'm a bit in a rush.

  • So...what time is now?

  • Click here to view the next class.

  • Goodbye!

Hi there.

字幕と単語

B1 中級

How to sound posh - Part one

  • 10805 201
    Sabrina Hsu   に公開 2017 年 03 月 18 日
重要英単語

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