Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I have a confession to make. For years I have been telling people "Stress makes you sick."

    今日は思い切って告白してしまいますが、私は長い間に渡って「ストレスは病気の元だ」と言い続けてきました。

  • But I have changed my mind about stress. I wanna change yours.

    でも、ストレスに関する私の考え方が変わったので、ここで皆さんの考え方も変えられたらと思っています。

  • Let me start with the study that tracked 30,000 adults in the United States for 8 years.

    まず最初に、アメリカで8年間に渡って3万人の成人を対象に実施された研究をご紹介します。

  • And they started by asking people "How much stress have you experienced in the last year?"

    この研究では、被験者に「去年、どれくらいのストレスを感じましたか?」という質問がされました。

  • They also asked "Do you believe that stress is harmful for your health?"

    それから「ストレスは健康に害を及ぼすと思いますか?」とも尋ねています。

  • People who experienced a lot of stress in the previous year had a 43% increased risk of dying,

    前年に多くのストレスを経験した人は死亡リスクが43%上昇しましたが、

  • but that was only true for the people who also believed that stress is harmful for your health.

    それはストレスは健康に害を及ぼすと信じていた人に限ってのことです。

  • People who experienced a lot of stress, but did not view stress as harmful, they had the lowest risk of dying as anyone in the study.

    ストレスを多く経験したものの、ストレス自体に害は無いと考える人は、この研究で最も死亡リスクが低いという結果が出ました。

  • 182,000 Americans died prematurely from the belief that stress is bad for you.

    18万2千人ものアメリカ人が、ストレスは体に悪いと信じたことが原因で若くして亡くなったというわけです。

  • I want you all to pretend you are participants in a study-

    皆さん、自分がある研究の被験者になったつもりになってみてください。

  • you come into the laboratory, you have to give a 5 minute impromptu speech on your personal weaknesses

    研究所にやって来たら、突然自分の弱点について5分間の即興スピーチを

  • to a panel of expert evaluators sitting right in front of you,

    目の前に座っている検査エキスパートのグループに対して披露するよう言われるとします。

  • now if you were actually in this study, you probably be a little stressed out - your heart might be pounding,

    さて、もし自分がこの研究に参加しているとしたら、おそらく少しはストレスを感じるでしょうし、心臓もバクバクするかも知れません。

  • you might be breathing faster, normally we interpret these physical changes as anxiety,

    息遣いも荒くなったりして、こういう身体に起こる変化は通常は不安症状だと考えますが、

  • but what if you viewed them instead, as signs that your body was preparing you to meet this challenge?

    これをむしろ自分が直面している挑戦に対して身体が対応しようとしている、という観点で考えたらどうでしょうか?

  • Now that is exactly what participants were told in a study conducted at Harvard University.

    実は、ハーバード大学で実施されたこの研究では被験者たちにこの事が伝えられたんです。

  • And participants who learned to view the stress response as helpful,

    ストレス反応は良いものだ、という見方を学んだ被験者たちは、

  • while they were less stressed out, less anxious, more confident, their physical stress response changed.

    ストレスの影響や不安も少なく、自信が増していき、身体的なストレス反応も変わっていきました。

  • Now, in a typical stress response, your heart rate goes up, and your blood vessels constrict,

    というのは、典型的なストレス反応においては心拍数が上がり、血管が収縮しますが、

  • but in the study when participants viewed their stress response as helpful,

    被験者たちがストレス反応は良い事だという観点を持った状況下での研究では、

  • their blood vessels stayed relaxed, like this. Their heart was still pounding

    血管がこのようにリラックスした状態を保っていました。心臓はそれでも高鳴っていましたが

  • but this is a much healthier cardiovascular profile- it's a lot like what happens in moments of courage.

    心血管はこちらの方が大幅に健全な状態を示しており、これは勇気が湧いてきた時などによく見られる現象です。

  • We need to talk about a hormone - oxytocin.

    ここでホルモン、つまりオキシトシンについて考えましょう。

  • Oxytocin makes you crave physical contact with your friends and family.

    オキシトシンが分泌されると、友人や家族とボディコンタクトを取りたくてたまらなくなります。

  • It enhances your empathy. Your pituitary gland pumps this stuff out as part of the stress response,

    共感性も増し、 脳下垂体からストレスへ反応の一部としてこのホルモンが送り出されるのですが、

  • and one of its main roles in your body is to protect your cardiovascular system from the effects of stress.

    体内におけるその主な役割としては、心血管系をストレスの影響下から保護するというものがあるのです。

  • Your heart has receptors for this hormone,

    心臓にはこのホルモンの受容器官があって、

  • and oxytocin helps heart cells regenerate from any stress-induced damage.

    オキシトシンは心臓細胞をストレスが誘発するダメージから再生させる助けをします。

  • I wanna finish by telling you about one more study. This study tracked about a 1000 adults in the United States,

    最後にもう1つの研究のお話しをして終わりたいと思います。この研究はアメリカの成人1000人を対象に実施され、

  • and they started the study by asking "How much stress have you experienced in the last year?"

    最初に「去年、どれくらいのストレスを感じましたか?」という質問をし、

  • They also asked "How much time have you spent helping out friends?"

    また「友だちに手助けをするのにどれくらい時間を費やしましたか?」とも質問をしました。

  • People who spent time caring for others, showed absolutely no stress related increase in dying, zero.

    他人を手助けするために時間を費やした人には、ストレス関連の死亡リスク上昇は全く持って示されませんでした。ゼロです。

  • When you choose to view your stress response as helpful, you create the biology of courage.

    ストレス反応が良いものだという観点を選ぶことで、生物学的な勇気を生み出すことになるのです。

  • And when you choose to connect with others under stress, you can create resilience.

    そしてストレス下においてもあえて他者と交わりを持つことで、逆境に立ち向かうことができるのです。

  • Thank you.

    御清聴ありがとうございました。

I have a confession to make. For years I have been telling people "Stress makes you sick."

今日は思い切って告白してしまいますが、私は長い間に渡って「ストレスは病気の元だ」と言い続けてきました。

字幕と単語

B1 中級 日本語 ストレス 研究 被験 死亡リスク オキシトシン 心臓

【TED】ストレスと友達になる方法 Short Ver. (Kelly McGonigal | How to make stress your friend (Condensed Talk))

  • 132099 7470
    Ya-han Chang   に公開 2017 年 02 月 10 日
動画の中の単語

前のバージョンに戻す