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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Discussing donations, fighting fires and parking without people - all that`s coming up.

  • But we start this Tuesday edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS with new developments and two stories we`ve told you about recently.

  • First, the nation of Turkey.

  • Yesterday, we reported on protests there, the largest demonstrations against Turkey`s government in years.

  • Yesterday, they were still going, this started in Istanbul,

  • but the fighting between protesters and police forces has spread to other cities like the capital, Ankara.

  • The big focus of these protests is Turkey`s prime minister,

  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan has run the country`s government for ten years.

  • A local journalist described him as the most powerful and popular politician Turkey has seen in generations,

  • but some Turks disagree with Erdogan`s controlling leadership style.

  • The journalists said he thinks people are protesting because they want their voices heard.

  • For now, the protesters show no signs of backing down and Prime Minister Erdogan shows no signs of giving into their demands.

  • The other story we are following up on is about a virus that first showed up in the Middle East.

  • Now, it`s spread to Italy.

  • It`s called the Middle East respiratory symptom Coronavirus or MERS-CoV for short.

  • The general director of the World Health Organization says it`s a threat to the entire world.

  • So far, 53 known infections have been reported,

  • but of those 53 cases, the patients in 30 of them have died.

  • Over the weekend, three new cases were reported in Italy, it`s first time the virus has shown up in that country.

  • Health officials said all three patients are in stable condition, one thing they all had in common,

  • they had either travel to the Middle East recently or been in contact with someone who had.

  • In fact, that`s been the case for all the reported cases of MERS-CoV so far.

  • That`s one of the few things that health officials do know about this virus.

  • How it spreads, still a mystery.

  • In order to prevent infections, scientists need as much information as they can,

  • and the World Health Organization is asking the entire world to pull its resources together to study this virus.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just the facts:

  • cystic fibrosis is a disease that can affect a person`s lungs and digestive system.

  • Symptoms can appear in newborn babies or may not show up until adulthood.

  • Cystic fibrosis is life threatening.

  • That can be treated, but there is no cure.

  • AZUZ: Sarah Murnaghan was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was a baby.

  • Now, Sarah is ten, and her hope is that she`ll get a new set of lungs.

  • That would have to come from an organ donor.

  • You might have seen a notice about organ donation at the DMV.

  • People can sign up to be an organ donor when they renew or get their license.

  • Some organs can be donated while you`re alive, others like lungs are donated after the donor has died.

  • Every day around 80 Americans get a life-saving organ transplant,

  • and every day nearly 20 Americans die while waiting for an organ donations.

  • Right now there are around 1700 people on the waiting list for lungs.

  • Sarah is at the top of the list for pediatric lungs, adult lungs are a lot more available, but getting those can be challenging for different reasons.

  • Susan Candiotti explains why in this report on Sarah.

  • SUSAN CANDIOTTI, CNN ANCHOR: Sarah Murnaghan`s lungs are getting weaker and weaker.

  • The ten-year old with cystic fibrosis is now in intensive care.

  • Wise beyond her years, Sarah knows she needs a transplant, and is in a battle for her life.

  • SARAH MURNAGHAN, NEEDS LUNG TRANSPLANT: No, I`m never gonna quit! Never! Never!

  • CANDIOTTI: Sarah`s parents also are not quitting.

  • Frustrated because Friday the federal government refused to intervene.

  • JANET MURNAGHAN, SARAH`S MOTHER: Somebody needs to stand up and say, this is right, this is a human issue, this is not politics, this is a human issue.

  • CANDIOTTI: Even though Sarah`s at the top of the child`s transplant list in her region and has been waiting for 18 months,

  • federal guidelines disqualify her for an adult lung until she is 12,

  • unless every other adult on the waiting list turns down a donor lung.

  • In an email obtained by CNN, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told Sarah`s parents, she is not authorized to intervene.

  • But is ordering a transplant policy review, adding "I know this is not the answer you were hoping to receive, my prayers are with you."

  • JANET MURNAGHAN: She`s, I`m so sorry, I know this isn`t what you wanted to hear.

  • It is in her legal authority, we`re going to let your kid die over red tape?

  • CANDIOTTI: It`s a battle Sarah shares with other children, comparing her lungs disease with CF to a boat filling with sand.

  • SARAH MURNAGHAN: "You close your eyes and pretend that you`re on a boat.

  • But sand sinks your boat. But we`re gonna be OK."

  • CANDIOTTI (on camera): Tell me what you think her chances are now, given that the Secretary didn`t step in.

  • SARAH MURNAGHAN: If you directly donate your loved one`s lungs to Sarah, the law cannot change that.

  • And Sarah will use them and create a positive wonderful life and legacy for your loved one.

  • I`m praying that somebody sees this story and is in a position to save my baby.

  • CANDIOTTI (voice over): For now, Sarah says life is all about possibilities.

  • Susan Candiotti, CNN, New York.

  • AZUZ: Very powerful story. And in California more than 2,000 firefighters are working to get a massive blaze under control.

  • This is happening around 65 miles outside of Los Angeles.

  • It`s called the powerhouse fire, it broke out last Thursday near a hydroelectric plant.

  • Since then winds have helped spread the flames, and the wildfire has burned at least 25,000 acres.

  • And acres roughly the size as a football field, so imagine 25,000 of them, that`s how big an area we`re talking about.

  • Yesterday, officials said it was around 40 percent contained.

  • Around the 1000 homes were threatened by the fire.

  • Nearly 3,000 people were affected, told to leave their homes to get away from the danger.

  • Experts predict that the powerhouse fire may not be fully contained until early next week.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Kunis` U.S. history classes at Aviano Middle High School in Aviano, Italy.

  • The world "garage" comes from what language?

  • You know what to do. Is it Latin, Hindi, Greek or French?

  • You`ve got three seconds, go.

  • "Garage" comes from a French word that means "to shelter."

  • That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

  • AZUZ: How many times have you left your car in a parking garage and then come back later and have that split second -

  • oh no, where did I park feeling?

  • What if you didn`t have to ever remember where you parked?

  • In fact, what you never had to park at all?

  • Jack Tapper explains how a new type of garage handles autos with automation.

  • JACK TAPPER, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Do you think this is scary?

  • What about letting a robot park your car?

  • The family who brought you some of the fastest rollercoasters in the world is now brining you this: the robot garage.

  • Now, don`t get too excited, a robot won`t be behind the wheel.

  • Rather, the garage does the parking.

  • Take a look at how it works: First, you pull in and park on a large steel track, next punch your code into a panel.

  • The battery-powered robot then slides under the tray and lifts your vehicle two inches above the floor,

  • moving it to an open parking space and in a touch worthy of Inspector Gadget spins your car around and parks it.

  • President and founder of Boomerang Chris Mulvihill came up with the idea.

  • CHRIS MULVIHILL, BOOMERANG PRESIDENT: You don`t have to remember where you parked. You don`t have to worry about the (inaudible).

  • TAPPER: Now, what you might be worried about is, what happens if the robot breaks down?

  • MULVIHILL: A very low level technician can come in and simply turn the button off and push it into an empty space.

  • TAPPER: That`s right, move it aside and the other robots keep working.

  • Similar technology has done well overseas, but robotic garages in the U.S. have only had moderate success, Mulvihill says, until now.

  • Even better robots eliminate the need for humans to walk through empty garages alone.

  • MARK PATTERSON, BOOMERANG CHAIRMAN AND CEO: Many bad things have happened in parking garages, but the patron never has to be in the garage in an unsafe environment.

  • AZUZ: Remember everything your parents taught you about good table manners?

  • These guys are about to throw all that out the window,

  • that`s what you got to do to keep up in the world of professional eating.

  • These competitors are cramming their crawls with the deli delicacy, pastrami, the winner packed away 25 half sandwiches in ten minutes.

  • Hopefully, he packs some anti-acids, too.

  • Some of our "Before We Go" segments are fluffy, but this one had some real meat to it.

  • In fact, they shouldn`t even call it a competition, they should call it a meat meat.

  • We`ll meet you again for tomorrow`s digestive CNN STUDENT NEWS. We hope you`ll choose to join us. Have a great day.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Discussing donations, fighting fires and parking without people - all that`s coming up.

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2013年6月4日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き (June 4, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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