Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • There's a few different versions -actually, many different versions - of learning styles.

    学習スタイルにはいくつかのバージョンがあります。

  • But probably the most common one that you've heard of,

    でも、たぶん聞いたことがある人が一番多いのではないでしょうか。

  • is that some of us are auditory learners,

    というのは、聴覚学習者がいるということです。

  • where we learn best by listening to things;

    物事を聞くことで最もよく学ぶところ

  • some of us are more visual learners,

    私たちの中には、より視覚的な学習者もいます。

  • where we learn best by seeing things;

    私たちは物事を見ることによって最もよく学ぶ場所です。

  • and some of us might be more tactile or kinesthetic learners,

    そして、私たちの中には、より触覚的な学習者もいれば、キネステティックな学習者もいるかもしれません。

  • where we learn best by actually doing things

    実践が一番

  • or engaging in physical activities.

    または身体活動に従事していること。

  • How many of you have heard of that before?

    そんな話を聞いたことがある人はどれくらいいるのでしょうか?

  • Well, the good news and bad news:

    さて、良いニュースと悪いニュース。

  • the bad news is, if you believe in learning styles, you're actually wrong.

    悪いニュースは、あなたが学習スタイルを信じているなら、実際には間違っているということです。

  • I'll explain that in just a minute.

    ちょっとだけ説明しますね。

  • But the good news is that it's not entirely your fault.

    しかし、良いニュースは、それが完全にあなたのせいではないということです。

  • This belief in learning styles is incredibly pervasive.

    この学習スタイルに対する信念は、信じられないほど浸透しています。

  • It's so common that few people ever think to even question it. Right?

    あまりにも当たり前のことなので 疑問に思う人はほとんどいませんだろ?

  • It sounds so logical. It sounds so real.

    それはとても論理的に聞こえる。リアルな感じがしますね

  • But when put to the test, we found that learning styles don't exist.

    しかし、実際に試してみると、学習スタイルは存在しないことがわかりました。

  • And there are tons of people that believe this.

    そして、これを信じている人はたくさんいます。

  • When we survey, for example, students and teachers,

    調査をすると、例えば、生徒や先生方。

  • we find that something like 90 percent of them

    そのうちの90%は

  • or over 90 percent of people believe they have a learning style.

    または90%以上の人が自分には学習スタイルがあると考えています。

  • And many teachers today are still told that part of their job,

    そして、今も多くの先生方がその仕事の一部を言われています。

  • in order to be effective teachers,

    効果的な教師になるために

  • is to figure out what their students' learning styles are,

    は、生徒の学習スタイルを把握することです。

  • and then accommodate them for the classroom.

    そして、それらを教室に収容します。

  • There are even a host of companies and organizations out there that support learning styles,

    学習スタイルをサポートする企業や団体は、数多く存在しています。

  • and who, for a fee,will train you on how to maximize your potential or that of your students,by addressing learning styles and learning what yours are.

    そして、あなたの可能性を最大限に引き出す方法や、生徒の可能性を最大限に引き出す方法について、学習スタイルに対処し、あなたの可能性が何であるかを学ぶことで、有料でトレーニングをしてくれます。

  • But again, the key is, when put to the test,

    しかし、繰り返しになりますが、重要なのは、テストにかけられたときに、です。

  • these learning styles don't exist; it doesn't make a difference.

    これらの学習スタイルは存在しないので、違いはありません。

  • I will say that when we survey people,

    人を調査するときに言います。

  • many people say they have preferences.

    好みがあると言う人が多いです。

  • So if I asked, "How would you like to learn something?"

    だから、"何か習いたいことはありますか?"って聞いたら、"何か習いたいことはありますか?"って。

  • or "How would you like to study?",

    とか「どうやって勉強したいですか?

  • many of you might say, "I'd prefer to see it,"

    見たい」と言う人も多いかもしれないが

  • or "I'd prefer to hear it," or "I'd prefer to actually do it."

    とか "聞いてみたい "とか "実際にやってみたい "とか。

  • So that's true.

    そうなんですね。

  • But the key is that those preferences don't actually enhance your learning when we test them in experimental conditions.

    しかし、重要なのは、実験条件でテストしても、それらの嗜好性は実際には学習を向上させないということです。

  • And there are many different ways to test this,

    そして、これをテストするにはいろいろな方法があります。

  • but the basic design is this:

    が、基本的なデザインはこれです。

  • We bring in a bunch of different people

    いろんな人を連れてきて

  • who supposedly have different learning styles.

    学習スタイルが違うはずの人たちが

  • We teach them in a variety of ways.

    いろいろな方法で教えています。

  • Then we see if teaching them in one way was somehow better for them or more effective than others.

    そして、ある方法で彼らに教えることが、彼らにとって何となく良いことなのか、それとも他の人よりも効果的なのかを見ていきます。

  • So for example, let's say I had a list of words I wanted you to memorize.

    だから例えば、覚えてほしい言葉のリストがあったとしましょう。

  • In one group I might show you that list of words;

    一つのグループで、私はその単語のリストを見せるかもしれません。

  • I'll present the list of words for you.

    言葉の羅列を提示しておきます。

  • Or in another group, similarly,

    あるいは別のグループで、同様に。

  • I might show you images of those words.

    その言葉のイメージをお見せするかもしれません。

  • In yet another group or another condition,

    まだ別のグループや別の状態で

  • I might just let you listen to those words and hear them,

    その言葉を聞いて聞いてもらうだけでもいいかもしれません。

  • so you wouldn't actually see anything,

    だから実際には何も見ないでしょう。

  • but you would hear someone saying: dog, hose, coat, etc.

    とか言ってるのが聞こえてきそう

  • Now if learning styles existed, if it was true,

    今、もし学習スタイルが存在していたとしたら、それが本当だったとしたら。

  • we would expect that visual learners, or so-called visual learners,

    視覚学習者、いわゆる視覚学習者を想定しているのではないでしょうか。

  • would be able to recall more words when they saw them.

    を見ると、より多くの言葉を思い出すことができるようになります。

  • So, either when they saw the list or when they saw the actual images.

    だから、リストを見た時か、実際の画像を見た時か。

  • And we would expect that so-called auditory learners

    そして、いわゆる聴覚学習者は

  • would be able to recall more words when they heard them, right?

    の方が、聞いた時に思い出す言葉が多くなるのではないでしょうか?

  • But the finding is, learning is actually the same.

    しかし、発見は、学習も実は同じなのです。

  • The number of words you recall is exactly the same,

    思い出す単語の数は全く同じです。

  • regardless of how the material is presented to you.

    素材がどのように提示されているかに関わらず

  • I know that's just one example of one particular study,

    それはある特定の研究の一例に過ぎませんが

  • but I’m asking you to trust me

    でも、私を信じてくださいと言っているのです

  • that this has been replicated in many different contexts

    これは様々な文脈で再現されています。

  • with many different people of all different ages,

    様々な年齢層の方々と

  • and tested in slightly different ways with exactly the same results.

    と全く同じ結果で、少しずつ違う方法でテストしてみました。

  • In fact, there have been several meta-analysis papers

    実際、いくつかのメタアナリシス論文があります。

  • where they've looked at all the research on this topic for 40 years,

    40年前からこの話題の研究をすべて見てきたところ。

  • and all of them have concluded the same thing:

    と、どれも同じ結論になっています。

  • that there is still no evidence

    いまだに証拠がないこと

  • that matching teaching styles to supposed learning styles

    想定される学習スタイルに合わせた教育スタイル

  • or students' preferences actually makes a difference.

    または学生の好みが実際に違いを生む。

  • But I would encourage you to look up some of this research on your own.

    しかし、この研究の一部を自分で調べてみることをお勧めします。

  • In particular, these review articles.

    特に、これらのレビュー記事。

  • So how is that possible?

    では、どうやってそんなことが可能なのでしょうか?

  • I’m sure some of you are wondering, "How does that even make sense?"

    "それってどうやって意味があるんだろう?"と疑問に思っている人もいると思います。

  • Because it sounds so good.

    響きがいいから。

  • And there's a lot of different research on learning and memory to explain this,

    そして、これを説明するために、学習と記憶に関する様々な研究が行われています。

  • but one of the main ideas is that most of what we learn in the classroom

    しかし、主な考え方としては、教室で習うことのほとんどが

  • and most of what our teachers want us to know in particular

    と、先生方が特に知っておいてほしいことのほとんどが

  • is stored in terms of meaning,

    が意味を持って格納されています。

  • and it's not tied to one particular sense or one particular sensory mode.

    そして、それはある特定の感覚や特定の感覚モードに縛られているわけではありません。

  • Now, just like people have preferences,

    今は、人に好みがあるように

  • it's also true that some of you might have better visual memories

    視覚的な記憶の方が優れている人がいるのも事実です。

  • or better auditory memories or auditory processing skills

    または聴覚記憶または聴覚処理能力の向上

  • compared to other people,

    他の人と比べて

  • and that might be advantageous for certain type of tasks.

    と、ある種のタスクには有利になるかもしれません。

  • So for example, if I wanted you to remember:

    だから例えば、覚えていて欲しかったら

  • What was the color of the coat on that last slide?

    最後のスライドのコートの色は何色でしたか?

  • or: How many windows were on that house on the last slide?

    とか最後のスライドで、その家には何枚の窓がありましたか?

  • then having a really good visual memory would help with that.

    視力の記憶力が良ければ、それに役立つだろう。

  • Likewise, if I had read you the list of words and I said,

    同じように、言葉の羅列を読んでいて、私が言ったとしたら。

  • "Were they read in a high voice or a low voice?"

    "高い声で読んだのか低い声で読んだのか?"

  • or, "Which words were read by a woman,

    とか、「どの言葉が女性に読まれたのか」とか。

  • and which ones were read by a man?",

    と、どれが男に読まれていたのか」。

  • then having a really good auditory memory would help with that.

    聴覚の記憶力があれば、それに役立つと思います。

  • But those aren't typically the kinds of questions

    しかし、それは通常、そのような質問ではありません。

  • that teachers are asking you to remember,

    先生方が覚えておいてくださいと言っていること

  • or the things teachers want you to learn in the classroom.

    または、先生方が授業で学んでほしいこと。

  • Mostly what you learn in the classroom is much more conceptual,

    教室で習うことは、ほとんどがもっと概念的なものです。

  • or meaning based.

    または意味に基づいています。

  • It's not just what something looks like or what something sounds like.

    見た目だけでなく、何かの音がするだけでもない。

  • And by the way, this finding, this whole idea, also helps to explain

    ところで、この発見、この全体の考え方は、

  • why simple rehearsal strategies, like rereading your notes

    なぜノートを読み直すような簡単なリハーサル戦略をとるのか

  • or just rewriting your notes,

    あるいはメモを書き換えるだけ。

  • even though they're very commonly used strategies,

    ごく普通に使われている戦略なのに。

  • they tend to be not very effective,

    あまり効果的ではない傾向があります。

  • because rereading your notes or rewriting your notes

    なぜなら、ノートを読み直したり、ノートを書き換えたりすると

  • doesn't necessarily help you understand the material.

    必ずしも素材の理解に役立つとは限りません。

  • In order to retain information,

    情報を保持するために

  • we have to organize it in a way that's meaningful.

    意味のある方法で整理しなければなりません。

  • We have to make connections to it,

    そこに繋がるようにしないといけませんね。

  • connecting it to our experiences or coming up with our own examples

    自分の経験と結びつけたり、自分の例を出してみたり。

  • or thinking of how we're learning something in one class,

    とか、1つの授業で何かをどうやって学んでいるのかを考えたり

  • and how that relates to what else we know.

    そして、それが私たちが知っている他のものとどのように関係しているのか。

  • That's what helps us remember it.

    それが記憶の助けになっているのです。

  • There's a lot of research to support this idea

    この考えを裏付ける研究がたくさんあります

  • that most of what we learn is stored in terms of meaning,

    私たちが学んだことのほとんどは、意味の面で保存されているということです。

  • and not according to visual images or auditory sounds.

    ではなく、視覚的なイメージや聴覚的な音に合わせて

  • But some of the best, most relevant research

    しかし、最も優れた、最も関連性の高い研究のいくつかは

  • comes from these classic studies that were done in the 70s.

    70年代に行われたこれらの古典的な研究から来ています。

  • Chase & Simon were interested in chess players' abilities

    チェイスとサイモンはチェスプレイヤーの能力に興味を持っていました。

  • to recall pictures of chessboard games in progress.

    進行中のチェス盤ゲームの写真を思い出すことができます。

  • So what they would do is show players an image of a game in progress

    そこで彼らがやることは、進行中のゲームのイメージをプレイヤーに見せることです。

  • for a short time -- typically, only five seconds or so --

    ほんの少しの間

  • and then it would disappear.

    と言って消えてしまいます。

  • Then they would ask the players to recall where all the pictures were,

    そして、選手たちにすべての写真がどこにあったかを思い出してもらいます。

  • where all the pieces were in that picture.

    その写真の中に全てのピースが入っていました。

  • And what they found was a big difference

    そして、彼らが見つけたものは、大きな違いでした。

  • between novice players, or beginner players, and experts.

    初心者、もしくは初心者とエキスパートの間で

  • Beginner players, when asked to recall where the pieces were,

    駒がどこにあったか思い出せと言われても、初心者のプレイヤーは

  • could only remember about four pieces.

    4つくらいしか覚えていなかった。

  • Experts, on the other hand, could actually identify almost all of them -

    一方、専門家は、実際にそれらのほとんどすべてを識別することができました - 。

  • over 20 of them, they could correctly identify

    20個以上のうち、正しく識別することができました。

  • on the next game board when asked to recall these.

    これらを思い出してくださいと言われたときに、次のゲームボードで

  • Again, they were interested in knowing: Why is this difference?

    またしても、彼らは知りたいと思っていました。なぜこの違いがあるのか?

  • Why do we see this difference between beginners and experts?

    なぜ、初心者と専門家の間にこのような違いがあるのでしょうか?

  • It wasn't because, like you might be thinking,

    あなたが考えているように、そうではありませんでした。

  • that the experts had better visual memories than the beginners.

    専門家の方が初心者よりも視覚的な記憶力が優れていたということです。

  • It was because the experts had more experience playing chess,

    それは、専門家の方がチェスをした経験があるからです。

  • and more knowledge.

    と、より多くの知識を得ることができます。

  • In other words, this game board was more meaningful to them.

    つまり、このゲームボードは、彼らにとってより意味のあるものだったのです。

  • They could see the strategy involved.

    彼らには戦略が見えていた

  • They could imagine what was happening

    彼らは何が起こっているかを想像することができました。

  • and why the players had their pieces positioned the way they did.

    と、なぜ選手が駒の位置を決めていたのか。

  • And to further support this idea, they did a follow-up study.

    そして、この考えをさらに裏付けるために、彼らは追跡調査を行いました。

  • In the follow-up study,

    フォローアップ研究では

  • they showed the chess players pictures of randomly arranged chessboards.

    ランダムに配置されたチェス盤の写真を見せてくれました。

  • That's this picture here.

    これがこの写真です。

  • Now to you or I, or to a beginner chess player,

    さて、あなたにも私にも、あるいはチェスの初心者にも。

  • these might look basically the same.

    これらは基本的には同じように見えるかもしれません。

  • I mean, yeah, the pieces are in different places,

    そうだね、ピースの位置が違うんだ。

  • but for the most part, they might be equally difficult to remember.

    しかし、ほとんどの場合、同じように覚えるのは難しいかもしれません。

  • To an expert, though, we found big differences

    専門家には、しかし、私たちは大きな違いを発見しました。

  • when presented with a randomly configured board.

    ランダムに構成されたボードが提示された場合

  • Once it was random,

    一度はランダムだった

  • experts no longer had an advantage in remembering pieces,

    専門家はもはや駒を覚えることに優位性を持たなくなった。

  • because it wasn't meaningful to them.

    というのは、彼らにとって意味がないからです。

  • Because there's no meaningful arrangement in the second piece,

    2枚目には意味のあるアレンジがないからな。

  • they lost that advantage, which again, it just shows us further evidence

    彼らはその優位性を失いましたが、それはまた、さらなる証拠を示しています。

  • that we store information in terms of meaning,

    意味を持って情報を保存していること

  • and not according to a sensory mode.

    と、感覚的なモードに合わせてではなく

  • And this basic finding, by the way, has been extended to other contexts,

    そして、この基本的な発見は、ところで、他の文脈にも拡張されています。

  • everything from chess to basketball,

    チェスからバスケットボールまで

  • to computer programming and to dance.

    コンピュータープログラミングとダンスに

  • We store information in terms of meaning

    意味のある言葉で情報を保管しています。

  • and not limited to particular sensory modes.

    と特定の感覚モードに限定されない。

  • So that's the first reason.

    というのが第一の理由ですね。

  • Another reason why this learning-styles theory doesn't pan out

    この学習スタイル理論がうまくいかないもう一つの理由

  • is that the best way to teach something or learn something

    是が非でも

  • really depends on what it is you want to learn.

    本当に何を学びたいかにかかっています。

  • It depends on the content itself.

    内容自体にもよりますが

  • Now, if I wanted you, for example,

    さて、例えば、私があなたが欲しかったとしたら

  • to know what a bunch of different songbirds looked like,

    いろんな歌鳥の束がどんな風に見えたのかを知るために

  • the best way to teach you that

    その一番の教え方

  • is to let you look at pictures of those songbirds,

    は、それらの歌鳥の写真を見てもらうためのものです。

  • or let you see them in real life.

    とか、実際に見てみましょう。

  • But note that that's true for everybody,

    しかし、それは誰にでも当てはまることなので注意してください。

  • not just because you're a visual learner.

    視覚学習者だからというだけではなく

  • That's because looking at them is what I'm asking you to do,

    それは、それらを見ることが、あなたにお願いしていることだからです。

  • to remember what they look like.

    を覚えておきましょう。

  • On the other hand, if I wanted you to remember what they sounded like

    逆に、どんな音だったか覚えていて欲しいと思ったら

  • or be able to distinguish between different songs of different songbirds,

    または、異なる歌鳥の異なる歌を区別することができる。

  • then letting you hear them would be the best way.

    ならば、それを聴かせるのが一番の方法です。

  • But again, that applies to everybody.

    しかし、繰り返しになりますが、それは誰にでも当てはまります。

  • Just like if I wanted you to know what different flowers smell like.

    いろんな花の匂いを知ってほしいと思ったのと同じように。

  • The best way to teach you that

    ということを教えるのに最適な方法は

  • is to let you experience those flowers by smelling them.

    は、その花の香りを嗅いで体験してもらうことです。

  • But that doesn't mean you're an olfactory learner,

    だからといって、嗅覚学習者とは限らない。

  • or that you learn everything better through smelling.

    匂いを嗅ぐことで全てのことをより良く学ぶことができるということです。

  • I mean, take a minute to imagine

    想像してみてください

  • what that would look like in a math class

    算数の授業ではどうなるか

  • or an anatomy class or a physics class.

    解剖学の授業や物理学の授業を受けている場合もあります。

  • And as absurd as that sounds, it's really important to remember

    そして、それは不条理に聞こえるかもしれませんが、覚えておくことが本当に重要です。

  • that the same problems, the same criticisms apply

    同じ問題、同じ批判が適用されます。

  • whether we're talking about so-called olfactory learners

    嗅覚学習者の話をしているのかどうか

  • or whether we're talking about auditory learners or visual learners

    聴覚学習者か視覚学習者か

  • or even kinesthetic learners.

    あるいは、キネステティックな学習者であっても。

  • The last three might seem more palatable or more reasonable,

    最後の3つの方が口当たりがいいというか、合理的に見えるかもしれません。

  • but the same issues apply.

    が、同じ問題が適用されます。

  • It really depends on what I'm asking you to learn, the best way to teach it.

    本当に何を学べというのか、何を教えるのがベストなのかにかかっています。

  • But that also brings me to another point,

    しかし、それはまた別のポイントをもたらします。

  • this idea that many things can be taught using multiple senses.

    多感を使って多くのことを教えることができるというこの考え。

  • So it's not just limited to one, for example.

    なので、例えば1つに限定されるわけではありません。

  • So, say I wanted you to learn the game of football.

    だから、私はあなたにサッカーのゲームを学ぶことを望んでいたと言ってください。

  • Probably the best way to teach you football

    おそらく、あなたにサッカーを教えるための最良の方法

  • is to get you out there and play football,

    は、あなたを外に出してサッカーをすることです。

  • to actually practice and have that physical experience playing.

    実際に練習をして、そのフィジカルなプレイを体験してみましょう。

  • But you would also probably benefit from being able to watch a football game,

    でも、サッカーの試合を観戦できるのもメリットでしょう。

  • or being able to look at schematics or drawings

    見取り図ができる

  • of the different formations and different positions,

    異なったフォーメーションと異なった位置の

  • just like you'd probably also benefit from hearing coaching

    ヒアリングコーチングの恩恵を受けるのと同じように

  • or hearing feedback as you're playing.

    または演奏中にフィードバックを聞くことができます。

  • You're getting the kinesthetic experience, the visual and the auditory.

    視覚と聴覚のキネステティックな体験ができるんだよ

  • Similarly, if a music teacher wanted you to know

    同じように、音楽の先生が知りたいと思ったら

  • the different parts of a symphony orchestra,

    交響楽団の様々なパートを紹介します。

  • then going to an orchestra and listening to one would be beneficial.

    それならば、オーケストラに行って聴いてみるのもいいかもしれませんね。

  • But it would also add to the experience

    しかし、それはまた、経験を追加します。

  • if you had the capability to touch the instruments,

    楽器に触れる能力があれば

  • or maybe to learn how to play them.

    あるいは、それらの演奏方法を学ぶためかな。

  • Or to actually watch one live.

    実際に生で見ることも

  • Again, it's not that different modes make it meaningful to different

    繰り返しになりますが、モードが違うと意味が違うということではなく

  • people based on their learning style.

    人の学習スタイルに基づいて

  • It's not like all the visual learners are only going to learn by seeing it.

    全ての視覚学習者がそれを見ただけで学習するわけではありません。

  • It's because incorporating multiple sensory experiences

    それは、複数の感覚的な体験を取り入れることで

  • into one lesson makes it more meaningful.

    を一つのレッスンにすることで、より意味のあるものになります。

  • So then you might be wondering:

    そうすると、気になるかもしれません。

  • Why does this myth persist?

    なぜこの神話は続くのか?

  • There's a few different explanations.

    説明はいくつかありますが

  • The first one is quite simply that everybody believes it.

    1つ目は、誰もが信じているというのが極めてシンプルです。

  • It's so common