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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to the special edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Today, we`re focusing exclusively on the Oklahoma City area and the devastating tornado that tore through there on Monday.

  • This is what we know so far.

  • The tornado touched down near the town of New Castle, Oklahoma, just before 3 P.M Monday.

  • Residents had about 16 minutes warning before it hit.

  • From there, it moved to the city of Moore.

  • And that`s where the storm did its worst.

  • You can tell from this video, it was gigantic.

  • Officials said it was more than a mile wide, and the path that took across New Castle and Moore was 17 miles long.

  • That path was one of destruction and devastation.

  • Homes and businesses flattened, a local hospital severely damaged, two elementary schools took direct hits.

  • As of today, afternoon, authorities have confirmed dozens of deaths from this tornado including nine children.

  • More than 200 other people were injured.

  • The rescue effort started immediately Monday afternoon and continued through the night.

  • Pamela Brown has more on that.

  • PAMELA BROWN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Illuminated by flood lights, rescue teams searched tirelessly throughout the night,

  • sifting through mountains of debris where Plaza Towers Elementary School once stood.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Oh, my God!

  • BROWN: In some places, the debris was ten feet high, underneath every parent`s worth nightmare,

  • the bodies of schoolchildren who tried to seek shelter from a ferocious tornado, many more still missing.

  • The race to rescue dozens of students and teachers began right after the massive mile-wide tornado ripped through at least two elementary schools directly in its past.

  • At hardest hit Plaza Towers Elementary, a third grade class huddled in a hallway of their school.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We had to pull a car out of the front hallway off a teacher.

  • She -- I don`t know what that lady`s name is, but she had three little kids underneath her. Good job, teach.

  • BROWN: Worried parents sent to a staging area at the nearby church and search for answers.

  • At first, several children were pulled from the leveled school alive,

  • but with each passing hour the operation tragically went from a rescue to a recovery mission.

  • The heart wrenching reality of the storm`s fury hard to comprehend, even for those covering it.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I`ve never seen anything like this in my 18 years covering tornadoes here in Oklahoma City.

  • This is without question, that most terrific - I`ve never seen it.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right, Lance.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Listen, we need to get this information.

  • BROWN: The searchers were able to reunite many kids with their families.

  • AZUZ: In fact, rescuers have pulled at least 100 people out of the rubble alive.

  • At first, the search efforts were a mix of emergency responders and volunteers.

  • A local pipeline worker who joined in, said he felt it was his duty to help.

  • But eventually, so many volunteers showed up that officials had to ask them to stay away.

  • Police, firefighters, National Guard members, all involved in the search efforts, specially trained animals, too.

  • Chris Cuomo has more on how they helped.

  • CHRIS CUOMO, CNN CORRESPONDENT: They set up a perimeter here, it`s about six or eight men, inside there are dogs, three or four of them.

  • The dogs are working. They`re sniffing.

  • You hear barking, the barking could be signals, it can just be excitement.

  • The trainers know how to deal with that.

  • And what they do, is they have to follow the dogs through this debris field, and we`re showing you this because it`s very painstaking work.

  • It`s very detailed oriented, and it`s very dangerous, because they have to find their through it.

  • The dogs as well.

  • They, of course, have much more nimble, and are able to make it through very easily, you`re watching Chief, this dog`s name is, right now.

  • CUOMO: He`s working. He`s packed with this trainer right now.

  • He`s barking, that`s part of his work, just communication between trainer and the dog, doesn`t mean he necessarily found something.

  • But they have to find and follow him all through this, it takes time.

  • It`s sophisticated work, and it`s dangerous, and there are so much of it to do.

  • Because there are buildings like this that have fallen down all over.

  • As you come into this area here in Moore, Oklahoma, it comes in waves.

  • First, you see debris on the road.

  • Then you start to see that homes have been like sprayed, almost like power-washed with mud.

  • Then you start to see big things are missing: trees, power lines are down.

  • The street lights have stopped, and then everything is gone, and you get to this point.

  • TOM FOREMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Moore is just south of Oklahoma City.

  • It`s about 55,000 people, and look at the density of the neighborhood down here.

  • We talked a lot about Plaza Towers Elementary School, look at the school, here, but now look around it in this picture.

  • There are about 350 homes in an easy walking distance to that school.

  • And they were all subjected to the same type of forces the storm came through.

  • Look what it did.

  • Here`s the school before the storm hit, here it that same school afterward.

  • A quarter-mile to a half-mile away, here`s the medical center, which was also shut down devastated by this storm,

  • and just south of that, look at the theater down here, a popular gathering place.

  • Beforehand it was much different than it was afterward.

  • Clean and pristine, afterward, like the medical center, smashed to pieces.

  • This is important because those are samples all within the center of this path,

  • which seemed to have been added strongest right through here,

  • about a mile wide, side to side,

  • that`s where this storm came ripping through and by our estimate, there are at least 5,000 homes in this immediate most intense part of where the storm hit.

  • Not counting all the many, many thousands more before and after.

  • AZUZ: Whether it`s hurricanes along the East Coast, tornadoes in the Midwest or earthquakes on the West Coast,

  • you know that different kinds of severe weather have different rating systems.

  • For tornadoes, scientists used the enhanced Fujita scale.

  • It measures the storms wind`s speed based on how much damage it causes.

  • Experts say, there is evidence that this tornado at some point got up to an EF5.

  • Chad Myers explains what that means in terms of damage and more on the science behind these storms.

  • CHAD MYERS, METEOROLOGIST: All you need for a tornado really to form, though, are thunderstorms and a jet stream,

  • that jet streams aloft, it makes the energy, if you have moisture at the surface, dry air, cold air pushing that moisture up,

  • you can get a tornado to form in any state.

  • We have this - this almost as triangulation that no other country in the world, no region in the world has.

  • We have the Rocky Mountains to our west, we have the Gulf of Mexico in our South,

  • we have Canada and very cold air masses coming down from the north.

  • All of those things combined make tornado alley.

  • So now that EF scale, Enhanced Fujita scale starts at zero, goes only to five, anything above 200 miles per hour is considered an EF5 tornado.

  • And EF4, most of the home is gone, but you`ll still see the refrigerator, you`ll still see a closet, and you`ll still see the bathroom.

  • And EF5 you cannot find the house, it`s completely gone.

  • BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: If there`s hope to hold on to, not just in Oklahoma, but around the country,

  • it`s the knowledge that the good people there and in Oklahoma are better prepared for this type of storm,

  • and most, and what they can be certain of is that Americans from every corner of this country will be right there with them,

  • opening our homes, our hearts to those in need because we are a nation that stands with our fellow citizens.

  • AZUZ: President Obama declared a disaster in Oklahoma.

  • That helps make federal funding available for recovery efforts.

  • Two years ago today, an EF5 tornado hit Joplin, Missouri.

  • It was the single deadliest tornado in more than 60 years.

  • Joplin city manager knows what Oklahoma can expect.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: They have friends out there that are going to help -

  • they are going to need some assistance from other in the nearby area throughout the country,

  • and throughout the world, and we`re ready to respond and help them to whatever really we can and whatever assistance they need.

  • AZUZ: Supporters coming in from the sport`s world: baseball star and Oklahoma native Matt Kemp says he`s donating $1000 for every home run he hits.

  • NBA all start Kevin Durant pledged a million dollars.

  • His team, the Oklahoma City Thunder said it would give a million dollars as well.

  • There are a number of organizations either headed to Moore or already there: churches, medical teams, food banks.

  • If you`re looking for ways to help, one place to start is cnn.com/impact.

  • It has links to the Salvation Army, the Red Cross, Team Rubicon, World Vision, plus a lot more groups that are sending crews and accepting donations.

  • That link again, cnn.com/impact.

  • And if you`d like to write about what you`ve seen in our show or the news of this disaster in general, we have a blog post set up at cnnstudentnews.com.

  • In the middle of the destruction, in the start of a long road to recovery, there were signs of hope and unity in Oklahoma.

  • Like this American flag, that a group of Navy reservists raised over some of the debris.

  • Oklahoma`s Lieutenant Governor said "We`re a tough state, this is a tough community, there is hope, we always have hope, we always have faith."

  • Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims of the storm as well.

  • For CNN STUDENT NEWS, I`m Carl Azuz. Thank you for watching.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hi, I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to the special edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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2013年5月22日 - CNN学生ニュース(字幕付き (May 22, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles)

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