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  • Hi there. My name is Emma,

  • and in today's video I am going to teach you a very, very important grammar point.

  • I'm going to teach you about a mistake many, many students make.

  • So I don't want you to make this mistake, so let's get started. In this video I am going

  • to teach you the difference between

  • "How long", "How long time", "How much time" and "How many times".

  • Students often confuse these four expressions. So let's look at some of the differences.

  • So I have here a question. I actually have three different sentences, here. One of them

  • is right, two of them are wrong. Okay? So let's look at these together. The first one:

  • "How long time have you been here?"

  • The second one: "How long have you been here?"

  • And the third one: "How many time have you been here?"

  • So one of these is correct. Which one do you think is right?

  • If you said: "How long time have you been here?" that's incorrect. This

  • one, it's wrong. Number two: "How long have you been here?" If you said this one, you

  • are correct. This is right. What about the last one? "How many time have you been here?"

  • This one is also wrong, but we can make it right if we add an "s". So let's go over each

  • of these so you can find out why some of these are wrong, and why some of them are right.

  • To get started, let's look at "How long". So when we ask somebody: "How long...?" we

  • are asking them about time. Okay? We want to know the amount of time for something.

  • So, for example: "How long have you been here?" I want to know, maybe, how many minutes. Or

  • maybe I want to know how many hours you've been here. Okay? If I ask you:

  • "How long have you lived in England?"

  • an answer would be a number that has to do with time. You might

  • say: "Five years.", "Four weeks.", "Two months." Okay? So when we ask: "How long...?" the answer

  • and what we want to know is about time; minutes, hours, days, months, weeks, years. Okay?

  • So let's look at another example. "How long have you lived in Spain?" The answer is going

  • to be something about time. "Three years." Okay? You'll notice not always, but many times

  • we use: "How long" with the present perfect. It's possible to use it with the past tense,

  • the simple past, and also the future, but you will often see it with the present perfect.

  • "How long have you been married?", "How long have you worked here?",

  • "How long have you studied English?"

  • Okay? So a lot of the questions you probably want to ask somebody, you're

  • probably going to use: "How long have you...?" Okay? Very common way we ask questions.

  • So, what about: "How long time"? Can I say that also? Can I say:

  • "How long time have you lived in Spain?"

  • or: "How long time did you sleep on the plane?"

  • No. If you're asking

  • how long, you don't need the word "time". Okay? We never say in English: "How long time".

  • Many students say: "How long time", but this is not correct. The correct expression: "How long".

  • Not: "How long time". All right, so now let's look at "How much time" and "How many times".

  • Okay, so we've talked about "How long", which is good, "How long time", which is bad. Now

  • let's look at: "How much time...?" I think this is why many students get confused. I

  • think they confuse: "How long" and "How much time", and they... As a result, they create:

  • "How long time", which is incorrect.

  • So: "How much time" actually is pretty much the same as "How long".

  • When you ask: "How much time...?" you want to know about the amount of time.

  • You want to know about maybe

  • it's minutes, days, weeks, months, years. It's the same as "How long". Okay? So, for

  • example: "How much time does it take to get to work?"

  • I could also say: "How long does it take to get to work?"

  • They have the same meaning. Or: "How much time have you waited?",

  • "How much time have you been in line for?" Okay? So, the answers to these questions are

  • going to be about time. -"How much time does it take to get to work?"

  • "For me, it takes one hour."

  • "How much time have you waited in line?" -"I've waited in line five minutes."

  • Okay? So, for both "How long" and "How much time", they're pretty much the same. In conversation,

  • we usually use "How long". Okay? You can use both, but native speakers are more likely

  • to use "How long". So if you're trying to decide: Do I use "How much time" or "How long"?

  • "How long" is more natural and it's more common. Okay? But they mean the same thing.

  • Now, here's another area many students get confused. "How many times...?" "How many times"

  • is not the same as "How much time". The words "how" and "time" are the same, but these have

  • different meanings. First, before I tell you what this means, I want you to notice the

  • word "time" and "time" here. With "How much time" is there an "s"? No, there is no "s".

  • But for "How many times" there always is an "s". We don't say: "How many time", we say:

  • "How many times" with an "s". So this has a different meaning than this.

  • This is different because when you ask someone: "How many times", you want to know the number

  • of events. Not the time, the number of events. So you're counting; one, two, three, four, five. Okay?

  • So, for example, you might say: "How many times did you watch the movie Titanic?"

  • Some people watched the movie once, some people watched the movie twice, some people watched

  • the movie 100 times, maybe even 500 times. Okay?

  • So: "How many times did you watch the movie Titanic?",

  • "How many times did you eat today?" Maybe if you had breakfast, lunch,

  • and dinner, you ate three times. -"How many times have you been to the museum?"

  • -"I've been to the museum five times." Okay? So this, for "How many times", you're counting. And

  • your answer, it could be once, twice. After twice, we often say: "Three times", with an

  • "s" also, "Four times". Okay? We can also say: "One time", "Two times", that's possible, too.

  • So here's one more example: "How many times will you watch this video?"

  • Will you watch it one time, two times, three times, 100 times? I hope not, but I hope you watch this video.

  • And if you need to watch it multiple times, it can help you really with your understanding.

  • Okay, so just to go over what you learned in this video: We talked about "How long"

  • meaning we're talking about time; minutes, hours, days. We talked about "How much time"

  • which has the same meaning, but is less common. We talked about "How many times", which is

  • not the same, and which means you're counting. Okay? And we also talked about "How long time",

  • which is never, never correct in English. We never say: "How long time". Okay? So, it's

  • very good to practice these ideas and these concepts,

  • so I invite you to come visit our website at www.engvid.com.

  • There, you can do a quiz where you can practice these to

  • make sure you really understand the differences between these expressions.

  • Until next time, take care.

Hi there. My name is Emma,

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質問の仕方。どのくらい、どのくらい... (How to Ask Questions: HOW LONG, HOW MUCH...)

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    bubulan1 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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