Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Thank you. It's really an honor and a privilege to be here

    どうもありがとう!ティーネイジャーとしての最後の日を

  • spending my last day as a teenager.

    ここで過ごせてとても光栄です

  • Today I want to talk to you about the future, but

    今日は未来について話したいと思います

  • first I'm going to tell you a bit about the past.

    でも最初に少しだけ過去について話します

  • My story starts way before I was born.

    私の話は私が生まれるずっと前まで遡ります

  • My grandmother was on a train to Auschwitz, the death camp.

    私の祖母は死の収容所であるアウシュビッツに向かう列車に乗っていました

  • And she was going along the tracks, and the tracks split.

    列車は線路通りに進んでいましたが 線路が分岐しました

  • And somehow -- we don't really know exactly the whole story -- but

    そしてなぜだか 私たちには具体的な全ての経緯が分からないのですが

  • the train took the wrong track and went to a work camp rather than the death camp.

    列車は間違った線路に乗って死の収容所でなく労働収容所へ行ったのです

  • My grandmother survived and married my grandfather.

    祖母は生き延びて 祖父と結婚し

  • They were living in Hungary, and my mother was born.

    ハンガリーに住んでいた頃 私の母が生まれました

  • And when my mother was two years old,

    そして母が二歳の時

  • the Hungarian revolution was raging, and they decided to escape Hungary.

    ハンガリー動乱が起きた為 ハンガリーから脱出することにしました

  • They got on a boat, and yet another divergence --

    彼らは船に乗ったのですが これがもう一つの分岐で行き先は

  • the boat was either going to Canada or to Australia.

    カナダかオーストラリアのどちらかでした

  • They got on and didn't know where they were going, and ended up in Canada.

    どちらか分からぬまま乗船し 結局カナダに着きました

  • So, to make a long story short, they came to Canada.

    このようにして 彼らはカナダに来たわけです

  • My grandmother was a chemist. She worked at the Banting Institute in Toronto,

    祖母は化学者でした 彼女はトロントのバンティング研究所で働き

  • and at 44 she died of stomach cancer. I never met my grandmother,

    44歳の時に胃ガンのため亡くなりました 祖母には会ったことはありませんが

  • but I carry on her name -- her exact name, Eva Vertes --

    私は祖母の名前 ― エヴァ・ヴァーテス ― をそのまま継いでおり

  • and I like to think I carry on her scientific passion, too.

    祖母の科学への情熱も継いでいるのだと思っています

  • I found this passion not far from here, actually, when I was nine years old.

    実はここからそれほど遠くない場所でこの情熱に気づきました 私が9歳の時です

  • My family was on a road trip and we were in the Grand Canyon.

    車で家族旅行をしていて 私たちはグランドキャニオンにいました

  • And I had never been a reader when I was young --

    私は本を読む子供ではありませんでした

  • my dad had tried me with the Hardy Boys; I tried Nancy Drew;

    父に勧められたハーディ・ボーイズや自分で読もうとしたナンシー・ドルーなど

  • I tried all that -- and I just didn't like reading books.

    全て試してはみましたが とにかく読書が好きでなかったのです

  • And my mother bought this book when we were at the Grand Canyon

    ところがグランドキャニオンで 母が「ホット・ゾーン」という本を買いました

  • called "The Hot Zone." It was all about the outbreak of the Ebola virus.

    それはエボラウィルスの発生についての本でした

  • And something about it just kind of drew me towards it.

    その本の何かがなんというか 私を惹きつけたのです

  • There was this big sort of bumpy-looking virus on the cover,

    表紙にはでこぼこした見かけのウィルスが大きく載っていて

  • and I just wanted to read it. I picked up that book,

    とにかく読みたくなり 私はその本を手に取りました

  • and as we drove from the edge of the Grand Canyon

    そしてグランドキャニオンの端からビッグ・サーへ

  • to Big Sur, and to, actually, here where we are today, in Monterey,

    更に今日私たちがいるモントレーまで車で移動する間

  • I read that book, and from when I was reading that book,

    その本を読みました そしてその本を読んだときから

  • I knew that I wanted to have a life in medicine.

    私は医学に携わった人生を送りたいのだと感じていたのです

  • I wanted to be like the explorers I'd read about in the book,

    アフリカのジャングルに入ったり

  • who went into the jungles of Africa,

    この致死性の高いウィルスが何なのか

  • went into the research labs and just tried to figure out

    研究所で究明しようとした

  • what this deadly virus was. So from that moment on, I read every medical book

    本の中の調査員のようになりたかったのです それ以来 私は手に入る

  • I could get my hands on, and I just loved it so much.

    医学書を全て読み ただもう夢中になりました

  • I was a passive observer of the medical world.

    私は医学界の傍観者でしたが

  • It wasn't until I entered high school that I thought,

    高校に入学してから 「もしかすると今なら

  • "Maybe now, you know -- being a big high school kid --

    もう立派な高校生なんだし

  • I can maybe become an active part of this big medical world."

    この大きな医学の世界でも何か出来るかもしれない」と思うようになりました

  • I was 14, and I emailed professors at the local university

    当時14歳だった私は 研究室で働かせてもらえないかと

  • to see if maybe I could go work in their lab. And hardly anyone responded.

    地元の大学教授たちにメールしましたが ほとんど誰からも返信がありませんでした

  • But I mean, why would they respond to a 14-year-old, anyway?

    でも 誰が14歳の相手をするでしょう?

  • And I got to go talk to one professor, Dr. Jacobs,

    ところがジェイコブス博士と話す機会があり

  • who accepted me into the lab.

    私は研究室に受け入れられることになりました

  • At that time, I was really interested in neuroscience

    当時 私は神経科学にとても興味を持っていて

  • and wanted to do a research project in neurology --

    神経学の研究をしたいと思っていました

  • specifically looking at the effects of heavy metals on the developing nervous system.

    特に発達中の神経系統に対する重金属の影響の研究です

  • So I started that, and worked in his lab for a year,

    そこで私はその課題で研究を始め 彼の研究室で一年間作業し

  • and found the results that I guess you'd expect to find

    予想通りと言える結果を目にしました

  • when you feed fruit flies heavy metals -- that it really, really impaired the nervous system.

    ミバエに重金属を与えると 神経系統は非常に大きな障害を受けるのです

  • The spinal cord had breaks. The neurons were crossing in every which way.

    脊髄は断続的になり 神経はごちゃごちゃになっていました

  • And from then I wanted to look not at impairment, but at prevention of impairment.

    その後私は障害ではなくその予防を研究したくなりました

  • So that's what led me to Alzheimer's. I started reading about Alzheimer's

    それがアルツハイマーに取り組むきっかけです 私はアルツハイマーに関する文献を読み始め

  • and tried to familiarize myself with the research,

    その分野の研究に詳しくなろうとしました

  • and at the same time when I was in the --

    そんな中

  • I was reading in the medical library one day, and I read this article

    ある日私は医学図書館で読み物をしていて

  • about something called "purine derivatives."

    プリン誘導体というものに関する記事を読みました

  • And they seemed to have cell growth-promoting properties.

    それには細胞の増殖を促進させる性質があるようでした

  • And being naive about the whole field, I kind of thought,

    その分野について無学なこともあり こう思いました

  • "Oh, you have cell death in Alzheimer's

    「アルツハイマーで記憶障害を引き起こすのが細胞死で

  • which is causing the memory deficit, and then you have this compound --

    一方こちらのプリン誘導体という化合物は

  • purine derivatives -- that are promoting cell growth."

    細胞増殖を促進するのか」

  • And so I thought, "Maybe if it can promote cell growth,

    そして「細胞増殖を促進できるのならもしかして

  • it can inhibit cell death, too."

    細胞死の抑制もできるのでは」と考えました

  • And so that's the project that I pursued for that year,

    こうしてその年私はこの研究に取り組み

  • and it's continuing now as well,

    現在も続けているのですが

  • and found that a specific purine derivative called "guanidine"

    グアニジンと呼ばれる特定のプリン誘導体が

  • had inhibited the cell growth by approximately 60 percent.

    細胞増殖を約60%抑制することが分かりました

  • So I presented those results at the International Science Fair,

    それで私はこれをインテル国際学生科学フェアで発表しました

  • which was just one of the most amazing experiences of my life.

    これは人生の中で最も素晴らしい体験の一つで

  • And there I was awarded "Best in the World in Medicine,"

    私は医学分野の最優秀賞を受賞しました

  • which allowed me to get in, or at least get a foot in the door of the big medical world.

    おかげで私は大きな医学界に加わり 少なくとも足がかりを得ることができました

  • And from then on, since I was now in this huge exciting world,

    それ以来 この巨大でエキサイティングな世界に入ったのだから

  • I wanted to explore it all. I wanted it all at once, but knew I couldn't really get that.

    全てを学びたいと思いました 実際は無理と知りつつも一度に全部知りたいと思っていました

  • And I stumbled across something called "cancer stem cells."

    そしてたまたまガン幹細胞というものに遭遇しました

  • And this is really what I want to talk to you about today -- about cancer.

    これが今日私が話ししたい本題です ガンについてです

  • At first when I heard of cancer stem cells,

    ガン幹細胞について初めて聞いたとき

  • I didn't really know how to put the two together. I'd heard of stem cells,

    ガン細胞と幹細胞の二つがどう関係するのかよく分かりませんでした

  • and I'd heard of them as the panacea of the future --

    幹細胞については未来の特効薬で 今後現れる

  • the therapy of many diseases to come in the future, perhaps.

    多くの病気の治療法となるかもと聞いていました

  • But I'd heard of cancer as the most feared disease of our time,

    一方でガンは現代の最も恐ろしい病気だと聞いています

  • so how did the good and bad go together?

    ではどうやってこの良いものと悪いものが結びついたのでしょう?

  • Last summer I worked at Stanford University, doing some research on cancer stem cells.

    昨年の夏 私はスタンフォード大学でガン幹細胞の研究をしていました

  • And while I was doing this, I was reading the cancer literature,

    そしてその傍らガンに関する文献を読んでいました

  • trying to -- again -- familiarize myself with this new medical field.

    いつものように この新しい医学分野に詳しくなろうとしていたのです

  • And it seemed that tumors actually begin from a stem cell.

    実は腫瘍は幹細胞から発生するようです

  • This fascinated me. The more I read, the more I looked at cancer differently

    私はこのことに関心を持ちました 学べば学ぶほど私の見方は変わり

  • and almost became less fearful of it.

    以前よりガンを怖く思わなくなりました

  • It seems that cancer is a direct result to injury.

    ガンは損傷の直接の結果であるように思えます

  • If you smoke, you damage your lung tissue, and then lung cancer arises.

    喫煙すれば肺組織が損傷し 肺ガンが発生します

  • If you drink, you damage your liver, and then liver cancer occurs.

    飲酒すれば肝臓が損傷し肝臓ガンが出来ます

  • And it was really interesting -- there were articles correlating

    そしてこれはとても興味深かったのですが

  • if you have a bone fracture, and then bone cancer arises.

    骨折と骨肉腫発症を関連づけしている文献がありました

  • Because what stem cells are -- they're these

    幹細胞の性質のせいです 幹細胞とは

  • phenomenal cells that really have the ability to differentiate

    驚異的な細胞で あらゆる種類の組織に

  • into any type of tissue.

    分化する能力を持っている為

  • So, if the body is sensing that you have damage to an organ

    臓器の損傷を感知すると

  • and then it's initiating cancer, it's almost as if this is a repair response.

    体はガンを発生させるのです 修復反応のような感じです

  • And the cancer, the body is saying the lung tissue is damaged,

    そのガンは肺組織が傷ついていて肺を治す必要があると

  • we need to repair the lung. And cancer is originating in the lung

    体が言っているということです そして肺を修復しようとして

  • trying to repair -- because you have this excessive proliferation

    ガンが発生します なぜかと言うと

  • of these remarkable cells that really have the potential to become lung tissue.

    本当は肺組織となる可能性を持つ細胞が過剰増殖するためです

  • But it's almost as if the body has originated this ingenious response,

    まるで体がこの巧妙な反応を引き起こしたものの

  • but can't quite control it.

    うまくコントロールできないように見えます

  • It hasn't yet become fine-tuned enough to finish what has been initiated.

    体はまだ始めたことを完了できるほど十分に微調整されていないのです

  • So this really, really fascinated me.

    私はこれには本当に興味を持ちました

  • And I really think that we can't think about cancer --

    また他の病気でもそうですが 私はガンが白黒はっきりした言葉で

  • let alone any disease -- in such black-and-white terms.

    考えられるものとは思いません

  • If we eliminate cancer the way we're trying to do now, with chemotherapy and radiation,

    現在行なっているような化学療法や放射線療法でガンを排除することは

  • we're bombarding the body or the cancer with toxins, or with radiation, trying to kill it.

    毒や放射線でガンや体を殺そうと攻撃しているのと同じです

  • It's almost as if we're getting back to this starting point.

    それではふりだしに戻っているようなものです

  • We're removing the cancer cells, but we're revealing the previous damage

    ガン細胞は取り除かれますが 同時に体が治そうとしていた

  • that the body has tried to fix.

    既存の損傷をさらけ出しているのです

  • Shouldn't we think about manipulation, rather than elimination?

    排除でなく 操作することについて考えるべきではないでしょうか?

  • If somehow we can cause these cells to differentiate --

    もしどうにかしてこれらの細胞を

  • to become bone tissue, lung tissue, liver tissue,

    骨組織 肺組織 肝組織などに分化させることが出来れば

  • whatever that cancer has been put there to do --

    ガン細胞の発生経緯にかかわらず

  • it would be a repair process. We'd end up better than we were before cancer.

    それは修復プロセスになり 最終的にガン発症以前より良い状態になります

  • So, this really changed my view of looking at cancer.

    そういうわけで これは私のガンについての見方を大きく変えました

  • And while I was reading all these articles about cancer,

    ガンに関するそういった文献を読んでいると

  • it seemed that the articles -- a lot of them -- focused on, you know,

    その多くが着目しているのは 例えば

  • the genetics of breast cancer, and the genesis

    乳ガンの遺伝子学

  • and the progression of breast cancer --

    乳ガンの発生と進行などのようです

  • tracking the cancer through the body, tracing where it is, where it goes.

    体中のガンがどこにあるか どこへ行くかを調べています

  • But it struck me that I'd never heard of cancer of the heart,

    でも心臓のガンというのは聞いたことがないと気付きました

  • or cancer of any skeletal muscle for that matter.

    そう言えば骨格筋のガンもありません

  • And skeletal muscle constitutes 50 percent of our body,

    50%またはそれ以上の私たちの体は

  • or over 50 percent of our body. And so at first I kind of thought,

    骨格筋でできています そこで最初私はこう考えました

  • "Well, maybe there's some obvious explanation

    「聞いたことがないけれど

  • why skeletal muscle doesn't get cancer -- at least not that I know of."

    骨格筋がガンにならない当然の理由があるのかもしれない」

  • So, I looked further into it, found as many articles as I could,

    そこで私は更に調査して 出来るだけ多くの文献を集め

  • and it was amazing -- because it turned out that it was very rare.

    驚きました なぜなら実際それは非常に稀だったのです

  • Some articles even went as far as to say that skeletal muscle tissue

    文献によっては 骨格筋組織はガンに対する抵抗力があるとまで

  • is resistant to cancer, and furthermore, not only to cancer,

    述べていて 更にガンに対してのみならず

  • but of metastases going to skeletal muscle.

    骨格筋への転移に対してもそうだと述べています

  • And what metastases are is when the tumor --

    転移とは腫瘍の細胞が

  • when a piece -- breaks off and travels through the blood stream

    分離して血流に乗り

  • and goes to a different organ. That's what a metastasis is.

    他の臓器へ移動することです これが転移です

  • It's the part of cancer that is the most dangerous.

    これはガンで最も危険な段階です

  • If cancer was localized, we could likely remove it,

    ガンが限局性なら 排除できる可能性があり

  • or somehow -- you know, it's contained. It's very contained.

    拡がりは抑制されています 非常に抑制されています

  • But once it starts moving throughout the body, that's when it becomes deadly.

    でも一旦体中に拡がり始めると致命的になります

  • So the fact that not only did cancer not seem to originate in skeletal muscles,

    そういうわけで 骨格筋にはガンが発生しないだけでなく

  • but cancer didn't seem to go to skeletal muscle --

    転移もしないという事実

  • there seemed to be something here.

    そこには何かがあるように思えます

  • So these articles were saying, you know, "Skeletal --

    それでこれらの文献には

  • metastasis to skeletal muscle -- is very rare."

    「骨格筋への転移は非常に稀です」と書いてあったのですが

  • But it was left at that. No one seemed to be asking why.

    それ以上は述べておらず 誰も疑問に思っていないようでした

  • So I decided to ask why. At first -- the first thing I did

    そこで私は調べることにしました まず最初に私は

  • was I emailed some professors who

    骨格筋の生理学を専門としている

  • specialized in skeletal muscle physiology, and pretty much said,

    何人かの教授にメールして聞きました

  • "Hey, it seems like cancer doesn't really go to skeletal muscle.

    「骨格筋にはガンがほとんどできないようですが何か理由があるのでしょうか?」と

  • Is there a reason for this?" And a lot of the replies I got were that

    そして私が受け取った返答の多くは

  • muscle is terminally differentiated tissue.

    筋肉が最終分化をした組織だからというものでした

  • Meaning that you have muscle cells, but they're not dividing,

    つまり筋肉細胞はあっても分裂しないので

  • so it doesn't seem like a good target for cancer to hijack.

    ガンが乗っ取るには良い標的ではないだろうということです

  • But then again, this fact that the metastases

    そうは言っても骨格筋への転移がない

  • didn't go to skeletal muscle made that seem unlikely.

    という事実を考えるとそれはなさそうです

  • And furthermore, that nervous tissue -- brain -- gets cancer,

    それに神経組織である脳はガンになります

  • and brain cells are also terminally differentiated.

    脳細胞も最終分化をしているのにです

  • So I decided to ask why. And here's some of, I guess, my hypotheses

    そういうわけで私は研究することにしました そしてこれはおそらく

  • that I'll be starting to investigate this May at the Sylvester Cancer Institute in Miami.

    5月からマイアミのシルヴェスター癌研究所で調査することになる仮説です

  • And I guess I'll keep investigating until I get the answers.

    そして多分答えを見つけるまで研究を続けると思います

  • But I know that in science, once you get the answers,

    ただ科学では ひとたび答えを見つけると必然的に

  • inevitably you're going to have more questions.

    更なる疑問が出てくるのが分かっているので

  • So I guess you could say that I'll probably be doing this for the rest of my life.

    多分私は一生これを続けるのだと言えるでしょう

  • Some of my hypotheses are that

    さて 私のいくつかの仮説ですが

  • when you first think about skeletal muscle,

    骨格筋についてまず考えのは

  • there's a lot of blood vessels going to skeletal muscle.

    沢山の血管が骨格筋へ向かっているということです

  • And the first thing that makes me think is that

    それで最初に考えさせられるのは 腫瘍細胞にとって

  • blood vessels are like highways for the tumor cells.

    血管は高速道路みたいなものだということです

  • Tumor cells can travel through the blood vessels.

    腫瘍細胞は血管を使って移動できるので

  • And you think, the more highways there are in a tissue,

    組織に高速道路があればあるほど

  • the more likely it is to get cancer or to get metastases.

    ガンや転移が起きやすいだろうと考えられます

  • So first of all I thought, you know, "Wouldn't it be favorable

    だから私は最初「ガンにとって骨格筋へ移動するのは

  • to cancer getting to skeletal muscle?" And as well,

    望ましいことではないのか?」と考えました 更に

  • cancer tumors require a process called angiogenesis,

    ガン腫瘍は血管新生と呼ばれるプロセスを必要とします

  • which is really, the tumor recruits the blood vessels to itself

    これは栄養を摂り成長するために

  • to supply itself with nutrients so it can grow.

    腫瘍が血管を自分のために確保することです

  • Without angiogenesis, the tumor remains the size of a pinpoint and it's not harmful.

    血管新生がなければ 腫瘍はピン先ほどの大きさのままで無害です

  • So angiogenesis is really a central process to the pathogenesis of cancer.

    つまり血管新生は正にガンの発症機序の中心的プロセスであるわけです

  • And one article that really stood out to me

    どうしてガンが骨格筋へ転移しないかを調べようと

  • when I was just reading about this, trying to figure out why cancer doesn't go to skeletal

    文献を読んでいるとき 一際目に付いたのが

  • muscle, was that it had reported 16 percent of micro-metastases

    剖検の結果 骨格筋への「微小」転移は

  • to skeletal muscle upon autopsy.

    16%であると報告している記事でした

  • 16 percent! Meaning that there were these pinpoint tumors in skeletal muscle,

    16%です!つまりピン先大の腫瘍はあるのに

  • but only .16 percent of actual metastases --

    骨格筋の実際の転移は0.16%しかないということです

  • suggesting that maybe skeletal muscle is able to control the angiogenesis,

    これはもしかしたら骨格筋は血管新生のコントロールや

  • is able to control the tumors recruiting these blood vessels.

    腫瘍による血管の確保のコントロールが出来るのかもしれないことを示唆しています

  • We use skeletal muscles so much. It's the one portion of our body --

    私たちは骨格筋をたくさん使っています

  • our heart's always beating. We're always moving our muscles.

    心臓は常に脈打っていて 私たちは常に筋肉を動かしています

  • Is it possible that muscle somehow intuitively knows

    血液供給が必要なことを筋肉は本能的に分かっているということが

  • that it needs this blood supply? It needs to be constantly contracting,

    ありえるでしょうか? 筋肉は絶えず収縮し続ける必要があり

  • so therefore it's almost selfish. It's grabbing its blood vessels for itself.

    ほとんど利己的なわけです 筋肉の血管を独り占めしているのです

  • Therefore, when a tumor comes into skeletal muscle tissue,

    そのために 腫瘍が骨格筋組織へ入って来ても

  • it can't get a blood supply, and can't grow.

    血液供給を得られず成長できないのです

  • So this suggests that maybe if there is an anti-angiogenic factor

    だからこのことは骨格筋に抗血管新生因子が

  • in skeletal muscle -- or perhaps even more,

    ある可能性を示唆しており 更にもしかすると

  • an angiogenic routing factor, so it can actually direct where the blood vessels grow --

    実際血管がどこで形成されるか決める血管新生の経路因子があるかもしれません

  • this could be a potential future therapy for cancer.

    これは有望な未来のガン治療法になり得ます

  • And another thing that's really interesting is that

    そしてもう一つとても興味深いことがあります

  • there's this whole -- the way tumors move throughout the body,

    腫瘍はとても複雑な仕組みで体内を移動しますが

  • it's a very complex system -- and there's something called the chemokine network.

    これにはケモカインネットワークと呼ばれるものが関わっています

  • And chemokines are essentially chemical attractants,

    ケモカインは基本的に化学誘因物質で

  • and they're the stop and go signals for cancer.

    これはガンにとっての「止まれ」「進め」信号なので

  • So a tumor expresses chemokine receptors,

    腫瘍はケモカイン受容体を発現させます

  • and another organ -- a distant organ somewhere in the body --

    そして体内の離れたところある別の臓器に

  • will have the corresponding chemokines,

    対応するケモカインがあると

  • and the tumor will see these chemokines and migrate towards it.

    腫瘍はそれを感知してそこへ向かって移動します

  • Is it possible that skeletal muscle doesn't express this type of molecules?

    骨格筋はこの種の分子を発現させないということはあり得るでしょうか?

  • And the other really interesting thing is that

    そして別のとても興味深いこととして

  • when skeletal muscle -- there's been several reports that when skeletal

    骨格筋の損傷が

  • muscle is injured, that's what correlates with metastases going to skeletal muscle.

    骨格筋への転移と相関しているという報告がいくつかあります

  • And, furthermore, when skeletal muscle is injured,

    そして更に 骨格筋は損傷すると

  • that's what causes chemokines -- these signals saying,

    それがケモカインを発現させ「ガンよ ここに来ていいよ」

  • "Cancer, you can come to me," the "go signs" for the tumors --

    という腫瘍へのゴーサインを発信させるのです

  • it causes them to highly express these chemokines.

    損傷はケモカインを多く発現させるのです

  • So, there's so much interplay here.

    そういうわけで ここには多くの相互作用があります

  • I mean, there are so many possibilities

    つまり 腫瘍が骨格筋へ転移しない理由として

  • for why tumors don't go to skeletal muscle.

    たくさんの可能性があるのです

  • But it seems like by investigating, by attacking cancer,

    しかし調査することで ガンに取り組むことで

  • by searching where cancer is not, there has got to be something --

    ガンが存在しないところを調べることで 何かが見つかるはずです