Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I'm going to talk about the simple truth in leadership

    翻訳: Kana Sasayama 校正: SHIGERU MASUKAWA

  • in the 21st century.

    21世紀のリーダーシップにおける

  • In the 21st century, we need to actually look at --

    真実について話しましょう。

  • and what I'm actually going to encourage you to consider today --

    今世紀、考えるべきことですが―

  • is to go back to our school days

    皆さん、思い出してみてください。

  • when we learned how to count.

    小学校時代に

  • But I think it's time for us to think about what we count.

    「測る」ことを習いましたね。

  • Because what we actually count

    今の私達が考えるべきことは

  • truly counts.

    「何を」測るか。

  • Let me start by telling you a little story.

    それが肝心なのです。

  • This is Van Quach.

    はじめに紹介したいのが

  • She came to this country in 1986 from Vietnam.

    ヴァン・クアッシュです。

  • She changed her name to Vivian

    86年にベトナムからアメリカに移民し

  • because she wanted to fit in here in America.

    ビビアンと改名しました。

  • Her first job was at an inner-city motel

    アメリカに溶け込みたかったのです。

  • in San Francisco as a maid.

    サンフランシスコ市内の小さなホテルで

  • I happened to buy that motel

    メイドとして働き始めました。

  • about three months after Vivian started working there.

    それから3ヵ月後に

  • So Vivian and I have been working together for 23 years.

    私がそのホテルを買い取ったので

  • With the youthful idealism of a 26-year-old,

    ビビアンとの付き合いは23年になります。

  • in 1987,

    私は26歳の若さと理想主義を胸に

  • I started my company and I called it Joie de Vivre,

    1987年

  • a very impractical name,

    ジョワ・ド・ヴィーヴルという会社を設立。

  • because I actually was looking to create joy of life.

    呼びづらい名前ですが

  • And this first hotel that I bought, motel,

    「生きる喜び」を創り出したかった。

  • was a pay-by-the-hour, no-tell motel

    最初に買ったこのホテルは

  • in the inner-city of San Francisco.

    時間貸しのラブホテル。

  • As I spent time with Vivian,

    サンフランシスコの街中にありました。

  • I saw that she had sort of a joie de vivre

    ビビアンを見ていて気づいたのです。

  • in how she did her work.

    彼女は自分の仕事に

  • It made me question and curious:

    「生きる喜び」を感じている。

  • How could someone actually find joy

    不思議に思いました。

  • in cleaning toilets for a living?

    どうしたら、トイレ掃除の仕事に

  • So I spent time with Vivian, and I saw that

    喜びを見出せるのだろうか?

  • she didn't find joy in cleaning toilets.

    そのうち、わかったのです。

  • Her job, her goal and her calling

    喜びを感じる理由はそこではなかった。

  • was not to become the world's greatest toilet scrubber.

    ビビアンの目標、使命は

  • What counts for Vivian was the emotional connection

    トイレ磨きで世界一になることではなく

  • she created with her fellow employees and our guests.

    彼女にとって本当に大切だったのは

  • And what gave her inspiration and meaning

    同僚達や滞在客との心の交流でした。

  • was the fact that she was taking care of people

    見知らぬ土地に滞在する人々の

  • who were far away from home.

    助けとなっているという事実が

  • Because Vivian knew what it was like to be far away from home.

    仕事に意義を与えていたのです。

  • That very human lesson,

    彼女自身も異国で暮らしていましたから。

  • more than 20 years ago,

    もう20年前ですが

  • served me well during the last

    ビビアンから学んだことが

  • economic downturn we had.

    過去数年の不景気の中

  • In the wake of the dotcom crash and 9/11,

    私を救ってくれたのです。

  • San Francisco Bay Area hotels

    9.11テロとITバブル崩壊によって

  • went through the largest percentage revenue drop

    サンフランシスコとベイエリアのホテルの収益は

  • in the history of American hotels.

    業界の歴史に例を見ないほど

  • We were the largest operator of hotels in the Bay Area,

    激減しました。

  • so we were particularly vulnerable.

    ベイエリア最大規模のホテル経営をしていたうちは

  • But also back then,

    特に大変な打撃を受けました。

  • remember we stopped eating French fries in this country.

    そのうえ、ちょうどその頃

  • Well, not exactly, of course not.

    アメリカ人がフレンチ・フライを食べなくなった。

  • We started eating "freedom fries,"

    実際は食べていましたが。

  • and we started boycotting anything that was French.

    「フリーダム・フライ」と呼んでね。

  • Well, my name of my company, Joie de Vivre --

    フランス製品のボイコットも始まった。

  • so I started getting these letters

    うちの会社の名前はフランス語。

  • from places like Alabama and Orange County

    手紙がくるようになりました。

  • saying to me that they were going to boycott my company

    アラバマとか、オレンジカウンティーから。

  • because they thought we were a French company.

    うちのホテルをボイコットするというのです。

  • And I'd write them back, and I'd say, "What a minute. We're not French.

    フランスの会社だと思っていたんですね。

  • We're an American company. We're based in San Francisco."

    なので、返事を書いた。

  • And I'd get a terse response: "Oh, that's worse."

    『うちはサンフランシスコの会社です』

  • (Laughter)

    返事は一言、『なお悪い』

  • So one particular day

    (笑い)

  • when I was feeling a little depressed and not a lot of joie de vivre,

    そんなある日

  • I ended up in the local bookstore around the corner from our offices.

    落ち込んで、「生きる喜び」も感じられず

  • And I initially ended up in the business section of the bookstore

    オフィスの近くの本屋に立ち寄って

  • looking for a business solution.

    最初は、ビジネス本コーナーにいました。

  • But given my befuddled state of mind, I ended up

    仕事の解決策を探していたので。

  • in the self-help section very quickly.

    だが、混乱した頭で気がつけば

  • That's where I got reacquainted with

    自己啓発本のコーナーにいた。

  • Abraham Maslow's "hierarchy of needs."

    そこで再会したのが

  • I took one psychology class in college,

    マズローの欲求階層説でした。

  • and I learned about this guy, Abraham Maslow,

    大学で一度だけ心理学の授業をとり

  • as many of us are familiar with his hierarchy of needs.

    アブラハム・マズローについて学んだ。

  • But as I sat there for four hours,

    彼の欲求階層説は有名ですね。

  • the full afternoon, reading Maslow,

    その日の午後、本屋で4時間座り込み

  • I recognized something

    マズローを読みふけったのですが

  • that is true of most leaders.

    そこに書かれていたのは

  • One of the simplest facts in business

    リーダーシップにおける真実でした。

  • is something that we often neglect,

    ビジネスでは見落としがちですが

  • and that is that we're all human.

    こんなシンプルな事実がある。

  • Each of us, no matter what our role is in business,

    私たちは皆、人間だということ。

  • has some hierarchy of needs

    仕事での役職にかかわらず

  • in the workplace.

    働く人の一人一人に

  • So as I started reading more Maslow,

    欲求階層があるのです。

  • what I started to realize is that

    マズローの本を何冊も読んでいて

  • Maslow, later in his life,

    知ったのですが

  • wanted to take this hierarchy for the individual

    後年、彼は欲求階層説を

  • and apply it to the collective,

    個人レベルから集団レベルへと

  • to organizations and specifically to business.

    当てはめていこうとしていた。

  • But unfortunately, he died prematurely in 1970,

    組織、特にビジネス関係に。

  • and so he wasn't really able to live that dream completely.

    残念なことに早世したため、

  • So I realized in that dotcom crash

    最後まで夢を叶えることは至らなかった。

  • that my role in life was to channel Abe Maslow.

    マズローの遺志を継ぐこと

  • And that's what I did a few years ago

    それが自分の役目だと思ったのです。

  • when I took that five-level hierarchy of needs pyramid

    今から数年前のことでした。

  • and turned it into what I call the transformation pyramid,

    マズローの欲求階層に従い考案したのが

  • which is survival, success and transformation.

    自己変革欲求階層。

  • It's not just fundamental in business, it's fundamental in life.

    生存、成功、自己変革の3段階がある。

  • And we started asking ourselves the questions

    ビジネスだけでなく、人生全般の基本です。

  • about how we were actually addressing

    そして自分の会社を見直してみました。

  • the higher needs, these transformational needs

    私たちはどのように

  • for our key employees in the company.

    要となる社員たちのより高度な欲求

  • These three levels of the hierarchy needs

    自己変革欲求に応えられているだろうか。

  • relate to the five levels

    自己変革欲求階層の3段階は

  • of Maslow's hierarchy of needs.

    マズローの欲求階層の5段階と

  • But as we started asking ourselves about how we were addressing

    呼応しています。

  • the higher needs of our employees and our customers,

    だが、社員と顧客の自己変革欲求について

  • I realized we had no metrics.

    自社を見直す中で困ったのは

  • We had nothing that actually could tell us whether we were actually getting it right.

    はっきりとした測定基準がないのです。

  • So we started asking ourselves:

    物差しとなるものがまったくない。

  • What kind of less obvious metrics

    そこでまた自問自答です。

  • could we use to actually evaluate

    あからさま過ぎず

  • our employees' sense of meaning,

    社員が仕事に感じる意義や

  • or our customers' sense of emotional connection with us?

    顧客と我々の心のつながりを

  • For example, we actually started asking our employees,

    測れる基準は何だろうか?

  • do they understand the mission of our company,

    そこで、社員たちに聞いてみました。

  • and do they feel like they believe in it,

    会社の理念を知っているか?

  • can they actually influence it,

    その理念を信じているか?

  • and do they feel that their work actually has an impact on it?

    自分の仕事は理念の実現に

  • We started asking our customers,

    貢献していると感じられるか?

  • did they feel an emotional connection with us,

    そして、顧客にも聞いてみました。

  • in one of seven different kinds of ways.

    我々との心のつながりを感じるかどうか

  • Miraculously, as we asked these questions

    7つの例を挙げて。

  • and started giving attention higher up the pyramid,

    すると、素晴らしい結果が出ました。

  • what we found is we created more loyalty.

    より高度な欲求に目を向けることで

  • Our customer loyalty skyrocketed.

    より強い忠誠心が得られたのです。

  • Our employee turnover dropped

    リピーター率が飛躍的に上がり

  • to one-third of the industry average,

    離職者率が業界平均の

  • and during that five year dotcom bust,

    3分の1に下がりました。

  • we tripled in size.

    IT業界が不振に苦しんだ5年間で

  • As I went out and started spending time with other leaders out there

    我が社は3倍のビジネス拡張。

  • and asking them how they were getting through that time,

    当時、他のビジネスリーダーたちに会うと

  • what they told me over and over again

    どのように不況を切り抜けているか聞いていました。

  • was that they just manage what they can measure.

    彼らの多くは

  • What we can measure is that tangible stuff

    「測れる」ものだけに目を向けていた。

  • at the bottom of the pyramid.

    「測れる」ものとは、目に見えるもの

  • They didn't even see the intangible stuff

    つまりは欲求階層の最下層。

  • higher up the pyramid.

    階層の上の目に見えない部分には

  • So I started asking myself the question:

    気づいてもいなかったのです。

  • How can we get leaders to start valuing the intangible?

    目に見えないものの大切さを伝えるには

  • If we're taught as leaders to just manage what we can measure,

    どうしたらいいか考えました。

  • and all we can measure is the tangible in life,

    リーダー達が「測れる」ものだけを管理し

  • we're missing a whole lot of things at the top of the pyramid.

    目に見えるもののことしか考えなかったら

  • So I went out and studied a bunch of things,

    欲求階層の上部は無視されてしまう。

  • and I found a survey that showed

    そこでいろいろと調べてみたところ

  • that 94 percent

    ある研究結果を見つけた。

  • of business leaders worldwide

    世界のビジネスリーダーの

  • believe that the intangibles are important in their business,

    94%が

  • things like intellectual property,

    ビジネスにおいて目に見えないものが大切だと考えている。

  • their corporate culture, their brand loyalty,

    たとえば、知的財産や

  • and yet, only five percent of those same leaders

    会社の文化、ブランドへの忠誠心。

  • actually had a means of measuring the intangibles in their business.

    だが、そのうちのたった5%しか

  • So as leaders, we understand

    それを「測る」術を持っていなかったのです。

  • that intangibles are important,

    つまり、私たちリーダーは

  • but we don't have a clue how to measure them.

    目に見えないものの大切さを知っているが

  • So here's another Einstein quote:

    それを測る基準がわからないのです。

  • "Not everything that can be counted counts,

    アインシュタインは言いました。

  • and not everything that counts can be counted."

    『「測れる」ものだけが大切なのではないし

  • I hate to argue with Einstein,

    大切だが「測れない」ものもある』

  • but if that which is most valuable

    アインシュタインに反論したくはないが

  • in our life and our business

    人生やビジネスにおいて

  • actually can't be counted or valued,

    もっとも大切なものが

  • aren't we going to spend our lives

    「測れない」のだとすれば

  • just mired in measuring the mundane?

    私たちの人生の基準はいつも

  • It was that sort of heady question about what counts

    平凡なものになってしまうのだろうか?

  • that led me to take my CEO hat off for a week

    そんな疑問に突き動かされ

  • and fly off to the Himalayan peaks.

    一週間CEOを休業し

  • I flew off to a place that's been shrouded in mystery for centuries,

    ヒマラヤ山頂に旅をしました。

  • a place some folks call Shangri-La.

    何世紀も謎に包まれた場所

  • It's actually moved from the survival base of the pyramid

    シャングリラとも呼ばれる場所です。

  • to becoming a transformational

    欲求階層の最下層の状態から

  • role model for the world.

    自己変革を成し遂げ

  • I went to Bhutan.

    世界の国の模範となった。

  • The teenage king of Bhutan was also a curious man,

    訪れたのはブータンです。

  • but this was back in 1972,

    まだ十代の国王は興味深い人物だった。

  • when he ascended to the throne

    1972年のことで

  • two days after his father passed away.

    彼は2日前に父を亡くし

  • At age 17, he started asking the kinds of questions

    王位を継いだばかりだった。

  • that you'd expect of someone with a beginner's mind.

    17歳の彼が抱く疑問は

  • On a trip through India,

    初々しさの残るものでした。

  • early in his reign as king,

    王座についてまもなく

  • he was asked by an Indian journalist

    訪問したインドで

  • about the Bhutanese GDP,

    インド人記者に質問されたのが

  • the size of the Bhutanese GDP.

    ブータンの国内総生産が

  • The king responded in a fashion

    どれだけかということでした。

  • that actually has transformed us four decades later.

    その時の国王の答えが

  • He said the following, he said: "Why are we so obsessed

    40年後の私たちを変えたのです。

  • and focused with gross domestic product?

    『どうしてそんなに

  • Why don't we care more about

    国の生産量にこだわるのですか?

  • gross national happiness?"

    それよりも考えるべきなのは

  • Now, in essence, the king was asking us to consider

    国の幸福量ではないのですか?』

  • an alternative definition of success,

    つまり、国王が提唱していたのは

  • what has come to be known as

    成功の新たな定義。

  • GNH, or gross national happiness.

    今ではこう呼ばれています。

  • Most world leaders didn't take notice,

    GNH(国民総幸福量)。

  • and those that did thought this was just "Buddhist economics."

    当時はほとんどの国が関心を持たなかったか

  • But the king was serious.

    単に「仏教的経済思考」だと考えた。

  • This was a notable moment,

    だが、国王は真剣だった。

  • because this was the first time a world leader

    それは歴史的瞬間でした。

  • in almost 200 years

    200年間で初めて

  • had suggested

    一国の指導者が

  • that intangible of happiness --

    目に見えない幸せについて

  • that leader 200 years ago,

    発言した――

  • Thomas Jefferson with the Declaration of Independence --

    200年前の例は

  • 200 years later,

    トーマス・ジェファーソンのアメリカ独立宣言ですが

  • this king was suggesting that intangible of happiness

    その200年後

  • is something that we should measure,

    ブータン国王が主張したのは

  • and it's something we should actually value

    政府は目に見えない幸せを

  • as government officials.

    重んじるべきではないのか

  • For the next three dozen years as king,

    ということでした。

  • this king actually started measuring

    その後、36年間

  • and managing around happiness in Bhutan --

    国王は実際に国の幸福量を測り

  • including, just recently, taking his country

    管理し始めたのです。

  • from being an absolute monarchy to a constitutional monarchy

    そして近年ではブータンを

  • with no bloodshed, no coup.

    絶対王政から立憲君主制に移行しました。

  • Bhutan, for those of you who don't know it,

    血はまったく流さずに。

  • is the newest democracy in the world, just two years ago.

    ご存知かもしれませんが、ブータンは

  • So as I spent time with leaders in the GNH movement,

    たった2年前に民主主義国になったばかり。

  • I got to really understand what they're doing.

    GNH運動のリーダーたちと出会う中で

  • And I got to spend some time with the prime minister.

    私はだんだん理解を深めました。

  • Over dinner, I asked him an impertinent question.

    元国王の総理大臣と話す機会もあり

  • I asked him,

    ディナーの席で

  • "How can you create and measure

    生意気な質問をした。

  • something which evaporates --

    『いつかは消えてしまう幸福のようなものを

  • in other words, happiness?"

    どうやって生産し、

  • And he's a very wise man, and he said,

    測れるというのですか?』

  • "Listen, Bhutan's goal is not to create happiness.

    賢明な総理は答えました。

  • We create the conditions for happiness to occur.

    『わが国の目標は幸福を生産することではなく

  • In other words, we create a habitat of happiness."

    幸福が起こりやすい環境を生み出すこと。

  • Wow, that's interesting.

    つまりは幸福の住処をつくるのです』

  • He said that they have a science behind that art,

    非常に面白い考えです。

  • and they've actually created four essential pillars,

    科学的な分析が行われているそうで

  • nine key indicators

    4つの必須事項と

  • and 72 different metrics

    9つの主要指標

  • that help them to measure their GNH.

    72の測定基準を使い

  • One of those key indicators is:

    GNHを測っているのだそうです。

  • How do the Bhutanese feel about

    主要指標のうちの1つは、

  • how they spend their time each day?

    一日の時間の使い方について

  • It's a good question. How do you feel about

    国民はどう感じているか。

  • how you spend your time each day?

    いい質問ですね。

  • Time is one of the scarcest resources

    皆さんはどう感じていますか?

  • in the modern world.

    現代社会において

  • And yet, of course,

    時間は希少な資源です。

  • that little intangible piece of data

    それなのに

  • doesn't factor into our GDP calculations.

    目に見えない「時間」というデータは

  • As I spent my week up in the Himalayas,

    国内総生産の計算には含まれない。

  • I started to imagine

    ヒマラヤでの一週間を経て

  • what I call an emotional equation.

    私が考え出したのは

  • And it focuses on something I read long ago

    「感情方程式」でした。