Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • (Music)

    音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (

  • Why do we cringe when we hear "Shakespeare?"

    "シェイクスピア "と聞くと、なぜ私たちは思わず涙が出てしまうのでしょうか?

  • If you ask me, it's usually because of his words.

    私に言わせれば、大抵は彼の言葉のせいです。

  • All those thines and thous and therefores and wherefore-art-thous can be more than a little annoying.

    Thines,th thous,therefores,where-are-art-thousとかはちょっとイライラするわね

  • But you have to wonder, why is he so popular?

    しかし、なぜ人気があるのか疑問に思わざるを得ません。

  • Why have his plays been made and remade more than any other playwright?

    なぜ彼の戯曲は他のどの<a href="#post_comment_1">脚本家<i class="icon-star"></i>よりも多く作られ、リメイクされてきたのだろうか。

  • It's because of his words.

    それは彼の言葉のおかげです。

  • Back in the late 1500s and early 1600s, that was the best tool that a person had, and there was a lot to talk about.

    1500年代後半から1600年代前半には、それこそ人が持っていた最高の道具であり、話は尽きませんでした。

  • However, most of it was pretty depressing.

    しかし、そのほとんどがかなり落ち込んでいました。

  • You know, with the Black Plague and all.

    黒の伝染病とかでね

  • Shakespeare does use a lot of words.

    シェイクスピアはたくさんの言葉を使います。

  • One of his most impressive accomplishments is his use of insults.

    彼の最も印象的な業績の一つは、彼の侮辱的な使い方です。

  • They would unify the entire audience; and no matter where you sat, you could laugh at what was going on onstage.

    観客全員が一体となって、どこに座っていても、舞台上で何が起こっていようと笑うことができた。

  • Words, specifically dialogue in a drama setting, are used for many different reasons: to set the mood of the scene, to give some more atmosphere to the setting, and to develop relationships between characters.

    ドラマの設定では、<a href="#post_comment_2">対話<i class="icon-star"></i></a>のような言葉は、シーンの雰囲気を整えるため、設定に雰囲気を与えるため、登場人物間の関係を発展させるためなど、さまざまな理由で使用されます。

  • Insults do this in a very short and sharp way.

    侮辱は非常に短く鋭い方法でこれを行います。

  • Let's first go to "Hamlet."

    まずは "ハムレット "だ

  • Right before this dialogue, Polonius is the father of Ophelia, who is in love with Prince Hamlet.

    この台詞の直前、ポロニウスはハムレット王子に恋するオフィーリアの父。

  • King Claudius is trying to figure out why Prince Hamlet is acting so crazy

    クラウディウス王はハムレット王子がなぜそんなに狂ったように振る舞っているのかを理解しようとしています。

  • since the king married Prince Hamlet's mother.

    国王がハムレット王子の母と結婚したので

  • Polonius offers to use his daughter

    ポロニウスは娘の利用を申し出る

  • to get information from Prince Hamlet.

    ハムレット王子から情報を得るために

  • Then we go into Act II Scene 2.

    そして第二幕第二場に入ります。

  • Polonius: "Do you know me, my lord?"

    ポロニウス「私を知っていますか?

  • Hamlet: "Excellent well. You're a fishmonger."

    ハムレット"よくやった。あなたは魚屋さんですね。"

  • Polonius: "Not I, my lord."

    ポロニウス「私ではありません、閣下。

  • Hamlet: "Then I would you were so honest a man."

    ハムレット"あなたは正直な男だった"

  • Now, even if you did not know what "fishmonger" meant,

    さて、「魚屋」の意味を知らなかったとしても

  • you can use some contextual clues.

    文脈に沿った手がかりを使うことができます。

  • One: Polonius reacted in a negative way, so it must be bad.

    1:ポロニウスがネガティブな反応をしたから悪いことに違いない。

  • Two: Fish smell bad, so it must be bad.

    2:魚が臭うから悪いに違いない。

  • And three: "Monger" just doesn't sound like a good word.

    そして3つ。"モンガー "は良い言葉とは思えない

  • So from not even knowing the meaning,

    だから、意味もわからない状態から

  • you're beginning to construct some characterization

    登場人物が出てきた

  • of the relationship between Hamlet and Polonius,

    ハムレットとポロニウスの関係について

  • which was not good.

    というのが良くなかった。

  • But if you dig some more, "fishmonger" means a broker of some type,

    しかし、もう少し掘り下げてみると、「魚屋」というのは、ある種のブローカーを意味しています。

  • and in this setting, would mean like a pimp,

    そして、この設定では、ヒモのような意味になります。

  • like Polonius is brokering out his daughter for money,

    ポロニウスが娘を金のために仲介しているように

  • which he is doing for the king's favor.

    と言っているのですが、これは王様のためにやっていることです。

  • This allows you to see that Hamlet is not as crazy as he's claiming to be,

    これでハムレットが主張しているほど狂っていないことがわかります。

  • and intensifies the animosity between these two characters.

    と、この2つのキャラクターの間の<a href="#post_comment_3">animosity<i class="icon-star"></i>を強調しています。

  • Want another example?

    他の例をお探しですか?

  • "Romeo and Juliet" has some of the best insults of any of Shakespeare's plays.

    "ロミオとジュリエット "には、シェイクスピアの戯曲の中でも最高の侮辱があります。

  • It's a play about two gangs,

    2つのギャングの戯曲です。

  • and the star-crossed lovers that take their own lives.

    と、自ら命を絶つ星の恋人たち。

  • Well, with any fisticuffs you know that there is some serious smack talk going on.

    まあ、どんな<a href="#post_comment_4">fisticuffs<i class="icon-star"></i>でも、いくつかの深刻な悪口が起こっていることを知っています。

  • And you are not disappointed.

    そして、あなたは失望することはありません。

  • In Act I Scene 1, right from the get-go

    第一幕第一場では、最初から

  • we are shown the level of distrust and hatred

    不信と憎悪の度合いを見せつけられた

  • the members of the two families, the Capulets and Montagues, meet.

    キャピュレット家とモンタギュー家の2つの家族のメンバーが出会う。

  • Gregory: "I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as they list."

    グレゴリー"私は通り過ぎてもしかめっ面をして、彼らが列挙した通りに受け止めよう"

  • Sampson: "Nay, as they dare, I will bite my thumb at them,

    サンプソン「いや、彼らがあえて言うならば、私は彼らに親指を噛みついてやる。

  • which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it."

    "それは彼らの不名誉である"

  • Enter Abraham and Balthazar.

    アブラハムとバルタザールの登場です。

  • Abraham: "Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?"

    エイブラハム:"親指を噛むんですか?"

  • Sampson: "I do bite my thumb, sir."

    "親指を噛みます"

  • Abraham: "Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?"

    エイブラハム:"親指を噛むんですか?"

  • Okay, so how does this development help us understand mood or character?

    では、この展開はどうやって気分や性格を理解するのに役立つのでしょうか?

  • Well, let's break it down to the insult.

    まあ、侮辱に分解してみましょう。

  • Biting your thumb today may not seem like a big deal,

    今日は親指を噛んでも大したことないと思われるかもしれません。

  • but Sampson says it is an insult to them.

    しかし、サンプソンはそれは彼らへの侮辱だと言っています。

  • If they take it so, it must have been one.

    彼らがそう考えるならば、それは1つに違いない。

  • This begins to show us the level of animosity between even the men who work for the two Houses.

    これは、両院のために働く男たちの間にも敵意があることを示し始めている。

  • And you normally would not do anything to someone unless you wanted to provoke them into a fight,

    そして、普通は<a href="#post_comment_5">provoke<i class="icon-star"></i>それらを喧嘩に持ち込みたいと思わない限り、誰かに何かをすることはないでしょう。

  • which is exactly what's about to happen.

    それはまさにこれから起こることです。

  • Looking deeper, biting your thumb in the time in which the play was written

    深く見て、戯曲が書かれた時代に親指を噛みしめながら

  • is like giving someone the finger today.

    は<a href="#post_comment_6">今日は誰かに指をささげる<i class="icon-star"></i></a>のようなものです。

  • A pretty strong feeling comes with that,

    かなり強い気持ちがそれに伴ってくる。

  • so we now are beginning to feel the tension in the scene.

    ということで、緊張感が出てきました。

  • Later on in the scene, Tybalt, from the House of the Capulets, lays a good one on Benvolio from the House of the Montagues.

    後半のシーンでは、キャピュレット家のティボルトが、モンタゲス家のベンヴォリオに良い一撃を浴びせる。

  • Tybalt: "What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?

    ティボルト"何だ、汝はこの無情なヒンドの中に引き抜かれたのか?

  • Turn thee, Benvolio, and look upon thy death."

    "ベンボリオよ 汝の死を見よ"

  • Benvolio: "I do but keep the peace; put up thy sword,

    ベンヴォリオ「私は平和を守るが、汝の剣を立てよ。

  • or manage it to part these men with me."

    "私とこの男たちを引き離すことができるかどうか"

  • Tybalt: "What, drawn and talk of peace!

    ティボルト"なんだ、引かれて和平の話か!

  • I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.

    私はこの言葉が嫌いだ、地獄もモンタゲもみんな嫌いだ、そして汝も嫌いだ。

  • Have at thee, coward!"

    臆病者め!

  • Okay, heartless hinds.

    よし、ハートレス・ヒンズ。

  • We know that once again, it's not a good thing.

    改めて、それが良いことではないことを知っています。

  • Both families hate each other, and this is just adding fuel to the fire.

    両家とも憎しみ合っていて、これは火に油を注いでいるだけです。

  • But just how bad is this stinger?

    しかし、このスティンガーはどのくらい悪いのでしょうか?

  • A heartless hind is a coward,

    心ない後ろ姿は臆病者。

  • and calling someone that in front of his own men, and the rival family,

    と、自分の部下の前で誰かを呼んで、ライバルの家族を呼んで。

  • means there's going to be a fight.

    戦いがあるってことだよ

  • Tybalt basically calls out Benvolio,

    ティボルトは基本的にベンボリオを呼び出します。

  • and in order to keep his honor, Benvolio has to fight.

    そして、名誉を守るために、ベンボリオは戦わなければなりません。

  • This dialogue gives us a good look at the characterization between these two characters.

    この対談では、この二人のキャラクター性がよくわかります。

  • Tybalt thinks that the Montagues are nothing but cowardly dogs,

    ティボルトはモンタゲスを臆病な犬だと思っている。

  • and has no respect for them.

    と尊敬の念を持っていません。

  • Once again, adding dramatic tension to the scene.

    改めて、シーンにドラマチックな緊張感をプラス。

  • Okay, now here's a spoiler alert.

    さて、ここでネタバレです。

  • Tybalt's hotheadedness and severe hatred of the Montagues

    ティボルトの熱血漢ぶりとモンタギューへの激しい憎悪

  • is what we literature people call his hamartia,

    は、私たち文学者が彼のハマルティアと呼ぶものです。

  • or what causes his downfall.

    何が彼の破滅の原因なのか

  • Oh, yes. He goes down at the hands of Romeo.

    ああ、そうだな。ロミオの手で倒れる。

  • So when you're looking at Shakespeare,

    だからシェイクスピアを見ていると

  • stop and look at the words,

    立ち止まって言葉を見る。

  • because they really are trying to tell you something.

    なぜなら、彼らは本当に何かを伝えようとしているからです。

(Music)

音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (音楽) (

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED-Ed 音楽 ハムレット 侮辱 親指 戯曲

TED-ED】シェイクスピアの侮辱

  • 26349 2144
    VoiceTube に公開 2020 年 08 月 06 日
動画の中の単語