Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So, I've known a lot of fish in my life.

    翻訳: Haruo Nishinoh 校正: Takako Sato

  • I've loved only two.

    魚との出会いは多かったけど

  • That first one,

    ほんとに好きになったのは2回だけ

  • it was more like a passionate affair.

    最初の魚には

  • It was a beautiful fish:

    熱烈に恋した

  • flavorful, textured, meaty,

    すごい美人で

  • a bestseller on the menu.

    味 歯ごたえ 肉質 文句なし

  • What a fish.

    メニューの売れ筋だった

  • (Laughter)

    ほんとにステキなサカナちゃん

  • Even better,

    (笑)

  • it was farm-raised to the supposed highest standards

    さらに良いことには

  • of sustainability.

    養殖魚だった それも最高レベルの

  • So you could feel good about selling it.

    環境に優しい養魚場で育てられた

  • I was in a relationship with this beauty

    だから良心の呵責なし

  • for several months.

    数ヶ月の間 僕は

  • One day, the head of the company called

    この魚に もう夢中

  • and asked if I'd speak at an event

    ある日 養魚場のボスが電話してきた

  • about the farm's sustainability.

    イベントで 話してくれないかって

  • "Absolutely," I said.

    養魚場が環境に優しいことについて

  • Here was a company trying to solve

    「喜んで」と僕はこたえた

  • what's become this unimaginable problem for us chefs:

    とうとう良心的な会社が現れたんだ

  • How do we keep fish on our menus?

    シェフの最大の悩みを解決してくれる会社が

  • For the past 50 years,

    それは「どうしたら魚をメニューに出し続けることができるか」ということ

  • we've been fishing the seas

    過去50年の間に

  • like we clear-cut forests.

    人は海を荒らし続けた

  • It's hard to overstate the destruction.

    森林を皆伐するように

  • Ninety percent of large fish, the ones we love --

    破壊の規模は計り知れない

  • the tunas, the halibuts, the salmons, swordfish --

    皆の大好きな 大型魚の90%がいなくなった

  • they've collapsed.

    マグロ オヒョウ サケ メカジキ

  • There's almost nothing left.

    乱獲されて

  • So, for better or for worse,

    ほどんど絶滅状態だ

  • aquaculture, fish farming, is going to be a part of our future.

    だから しかたがない

  • A lot of arguments against it:

    養殖漁業は 時代の流れだ

  • Fish farms pollute -- most of them do anyway --

    反対意見が多い

  • and they're inefficient. Take tuna,

    養魚場は海を汚す これは本当

  • a major drawback.

    非効率的だ マグロを見ろ

  • It's got a feed conversion ratio

    最大の悪玉だ

  • of 15 to one.

    マグロの 餌の転換率は

  • That means it takes fifteen pounds of wild fish

    15対1だ

  • to get you one pound of farm tuna.

    餌の魚15ポンドが

  • Not very sustainable.

    マグロの肉1ポンドになる

  • It doesn't taste very good either.

    とても環境に優しいとは言えないね

  • So here, finally,

    味も良くない

  • was a company trying to do it right.

    ところが ついに

  • I wanted to support them.

    正しいことをやろうという会社が現れたんだ

  • The day before the event,

    この会社を応援したかった

  • I called the head of P.R. for the company.

    イベントの前日に

  • Let's call him Don.

    広報部長に電話をかけた

  • "Don," I said, "just to get the facts straight, you guys are famous

    この人をドンとしておこう

  • for farming so far out to sea, you don't pollute."

    ドン 確認したいんだが 君の会社は

  • "That's right," he said. "We're so far out,

    沖で養殖するから 海を汚さないんだろう?

  • the waste from our fish gets distributed,

    「そうとも 沖合だから」

  • not concentrated."

    「排泄物は 拡散して」

  • And then he added,

    「一カ所を汚すことはないんだ」

  • "We're basically a world unto ourselves.

    そして

  • That feed conversion ratio? 2.5 to one," he said.

    「うちは 周囲の環境に依存してないんだ」

  • "Best in the business."

    「餌の転換率? 2.5対1さ」

  • 2.5 to one, great.

    「業界ナンバーワンだ」

  • "2.5 what? What are you feeding?"

    2.5対1か そりゃすごい

  • "Sustainable proteins," he said.

    何の2.5対1なんだ 何を餌に使ってるんだい

  • "Great," I said. Got off the phone.

    「環境に優しいタンパク質さ」

  • And that night, I was lying in bed, and I thought:

    そりゃすごいや 僕は電話を切った

  • What the hell is a sustainable protein?

    その晩ベッドで横になり 考えた

  • (Laughter)

    「環境に優しいタンパク質」って いったい何だ?

  • So the next day, just before the event, I called Don.

    (笑)

  • I said, "Don, what are some examples of sustainable proteins?"

    次の日 イベントの直前に もういちど電話した

  • He said he didn't know. He would ask around.

    環境に優しいタンパク質の例を挙げてくれないか

  • Well, I got on the phone with a few people in the company;

    ドンは知らなかった 尋ねてみるよって

  • no one could give me a straight answer

    会社の担当者と電話で話した

  • until finally, I got on the phone

    でも 誰もはっきりと答えてくれない

  • with the head biologist.

    最後に電話に出たのは

  • Let's call him Don too.

    主任生物研究員だった

  • (Laughter)

    この人もドンとしとこう

  • "Don," I said,

    (笑)

  • "what are some examples of sustainable proteins?"

    ドン

  • Well, he mentioned some algaes

    環境に優しいタンパク質の例を挙げてくれ

  • and some fish meals,

    彼が言うには 藻類

  • and then he said chicken pellets.

    魚粉

  • I said, "Chicken pellets?"

    そして 「チキンペレット」

  • He said, "Yeah, feathers, skin,

    チキンペレット?

  • bone meal, scraps,

    「そうだ 羽根 皮」

  • dried and processed into feed."

    「骨粉 くず肉」

  • I said, "What percentage

    「それを乾かして加工して 飼料にするんだ」

  • of your feed is chicken?"

    何パーセント

  • Thinking, you know, two percent.

    チキンを入れてるの?

  • "Well, it's about 30 percent," he said.

    たぶん2%位だと思ったんだ

  • I said, "Don, what's sustainable

    「30%かな」

  • about feeding chicken to fish?"

    ドン それで環境に優しいのかい?

  • (Laughter)

    チキンを魚の餌にして?

  • There was a long pause on the line,

    (笑)

  • and he said, "There's just too much chicken in the world."

    しばらく押し黙ってたよ そして言った

  • (Laughter)

    「だって 世界はチキンだらけじゃないか」

  • I fell out of love with this fish.

    (笑)

  • (Laughter)

    僕の恋は冷めちゃったよ

  • No, not because I'm some self-righteous,

    (笑)

  • goody-two shoes foodie.

    それは 僕が独善的な

  • I actually am.

    いい子ぶった 美食家だからじゃない

  • (Laughter)

    ホントはそうなんだけどね

  • No, I actually fell out of love with this fish because, I swear to God,

    (笑)

  • after that conversation, the fish tasted like chicken.

    恋はすっかり冷めた 本当だよ

  • (Laughter)

    電話の後 魚がチキン味になったんだ

  • This second fish,

    (笑)

  • it's a different kind of love story.

    二番目の魚は

  • It's the romantic kind,

    別の恋物語さ

  • the kind where the more you get to know your fish,

    ロマンチックな恋だ

  • you love the fish.

    相手を知れば知るほど

  • I first ate it at a restaurant

    好きになるという具合

  • in southern Spain.

    最初の出会いは

  • A journalist friend had been talking about this fish for a long time.

    南スペインのレストランだ

  • She kind of set us up.

    ジャーナリストの友人が この魚の話ばかり

  • (Laughter)

    彼女が二人の仲人ってわけさ

  • It came to the table

    (笑)

  • a bright, almost shimmering, white color.

    テーブルに運ばれてきた魚は

  • The chef had overcooked it.

    白身で 光輝くよう

  • Like twice over.

    シェフが熱を通しすぎてた

  • Amazingly, it was still delicious.

    二倍ほどね

  • Who can make a fish taste good

    でも 驚いたね とってもおいしい

  • after it's been overcooked?

    いったい誰が 魚を料理して

  • I can't,

    熱を通しすぎたのに おいしくできるだろう

  • but this guy can.

    僕にはムリだ

  • Let's call him Miguel --

    でもこの男にはできる

  • actually his name is Miguel.

    彼を 仮にミゲールと呼ぼう

  • (Laughter)

    実は 本名なんだ

  • And no, he didn't cook the fish, and he's not a chef,

    (笑)

  • at least in the way that you and I understand it.

    本当は 彼は料理してない シェフじゃないんだ

  • He's a biologist

    少なくとも僕たちが思うようなシェフじゃない

  • at Veta La Palma.

    スペインの南西端にある―

  • It's a fish farm in the southwestern corner of Spain.

    ヴェタ ラ パルマ養魚場の

  • It's at the tip of the Guadalquivir river.

    生物学者なんだ

  • Until the 1980s,

    グアダルキビール川の河口にある

  • the farm was in the hands of the Argentinians.

    1980年代までは

  • They raised beef cattle

    そこは アルゼンチンの業者が所有していて

  • on what was essentially wetlands.

    肉牛の牧場だった

  • They did it by draining the land.

    もともとは 湿地帯だったものを

  • They built this intricate series of canals,

    干拓したんだ

  • and they pushed water off the land and out into the river.

    運河を張り巡らし

  • Well, they couldn't make it work,

    水を川に移した

  • not economically.

    でも 農場はうまくいかなかった

  • And ecologically, it was a disaster.

    採算が取れなかったんだ

  • It killed like 90 percent of the birds,

    生態系は 壊滅状態

  • which, for this place, is a lot of birds.

    90%の鳥が死んでしまった

  • And so in 1982,

    ここでの90%は 膨大な数の鳥だ

  • a Spanish company with an environmental conscience

    それで 1982年に

  • purchased the land.

    環境保護に熱心なスペインの会社が

  • What did they do?

    この土地を買い取って

  • They reversed the flow of water.

    何をしたと思う?

  • They literally flipped the switch.

    水の流れを逆転させたのさ

  • Instead of pushing water out,

    文字通りスイッチを逆に入れた

  • they used the channels to pull water back in.

    排水するかわりに

  • They flooded the canals.

    水を運河に入れたのさ

  • They created a 27,000-acre fish farm --

    運河をあふれさせて

  • bass, mullet,

    109平方キロの養魚場を作った

  • shrimp, eel --

    スズキ ボラ

  • and in the process, Miguel and this company

    エビ ウナギ

  • completely reversed the ecological destruction.

    その過程で ミゲールと会社は

  • The farm's incredible.

    生態系の破壊を逆転させた

  • I mean, you've never seen anything like this.

    この養魚場は素晴らしい

  • You stare out at a horizon

    こんなものは前例がない

  • that is a million miles away,

    水平線を見ると

  • and all you see are flooded canals

    はるか遠くまで見渡せて

  • and this thick, rich marshland.

    目の届く限り運河が水に浸かり

  • I was there not long ago with Miguel.

    分厚い 豊かな 湿地が形成されている

  • He's an amazing guy,

    最近僕はミゲールに案内してもらった

  • like three parts Charles Darwin and one part Crocodile Dundee.

    すごいヤツだ この男は

  • (Laughter)

    ダーウィンとクロコダイルダンディーを合わせたようなヤツ

  • Okay? There we are slogging through the wetlands,

    (笑)

  • and I'm panting and sweating, got mud up to my knees,

    僕らは 湿原に踏み込んだ

  • and Miguel's calmly conducting a biology lecture.

    僕はあえいで汗びっしょり ひざまで泥だらけ

  • Here, he's pointing out a rare Black-shouldered Kite.

    ミゲールはすまし顔で 生物学を講義

  • Now, he's mentioning the mineral needs of phytoplankton.

    ほら と指さして 「希少種の カタグロトビだ」

  • And here, here he sees a grouping pattern

    植物プランクトンに必要な無機質

  • that reminds him of the Tanzanian Giraffe.

    さらに 生物群集を見て

  • It turns out, Miguel spent the better part of his career

    タンザニアのキリンを思い出した と言う

  • in the Mikumi National Park in Africa.

    後で分かった 彼はそのキャリアの大部分を

  • I asked him how he became

    アフリカのミクミ国立公園で過ごしたそうだ

  • such an expert on fish.

    どうやって と僕は尋ねた

  • He said, "Fish? I didn't know anything about fish.

    魚の専門家になったんだい?

  • I'm an expert in relationships."

    「魚? 魚については全くのシロウトだった」

  • And then he's off, launching into more talk

    「僕は生き物の関係性の専門家なんだ」

  • about rare birds and algaes

    そして さらに話を続けた

  • and strange aquatic plants.

    希少な鳥類や藻類の話

  • And don't get me wrong, that was really fascinating, you know,

    珍しい海草の話

  • the biotic community unplugged, kind of thing.

    誤解しちゃダメだよ すばらしい話だった

  • It's great, but I was in love.

    生物共同体の それは見事な天国さ

  • And my head was swooning over that

    素晴らしかった でも僕の方は

  • overcooked piece of delicious fish I had the night before.

    頭から離れなかったんだ くらくらして

  • So I interrupted him. I said,

    前夜に食べた あの魚のことで

  • "Miguel, what makes your fish taste so good?"

    それで 話題を変えて 尋ねた

  • He pointed at the algae.

    なぜ君の魚はあんなにおいしいの?

  • "I know, dude, the algae, the phytoplankton,

    すると 彼は藻類を指さした

  • the relationships: It's amazing.

    分かってるよ 藻類だろ 植物性プランクトン

  • But what are your fish eating?

    生命の連環だろ すごいね

  • What's the feed conversion ratio?"

    でも 魚は何を食べてるんだい?

  • Well, he goes on to tell me

    餌の転換率は?

  • it's such a rich system

    彼が答えるには

  • that the fish are eating what they'd be eating in the wild.

    「生態系が豊かだから」

  • The plant biomass, the phytoplankton,

    「魚は自然にあるものを食べているのさ」

  • the zooplankton, it's what feeds the fish.

    「水草 植物プランクトン」

  • The system is so healthy,

    「動物プランクトン そんなものが餌さ」

  • it's totally self-renewing.

    「生態系が健康だから」

  • There is no feed.

    「自然に すべてのものが再生する」

  • Ever heard of a farm that doesn't feed its animals?

    「餌なんてやってない」

  • Later that day, I was driving around this property with Miguel,

    聞いたことある? 餌をやらない養魚場なんて

  • and I asked him, I said, "For a place that seems so natural,

    午後遅く 養魚場の周りをドライブした

  • unlike like any farm I'd ever been at,

    ミゲール ここは自然そのものだね

  • how do you measure success?"

    これまで見たどんな養魚場とも違う

  • At that moment, it was as if

    いったいどうやって成功の度合いを計るの?

  • a film director called for a set change.

    と まさにその時 あたかも

  • And we rounded the corner

    映画監督が 背景の切り替えを命じたように

  • and saw the most amazing sight:

    カーブを曲がると

  • thousands and thousands of pink flamingos,

    驚くべき光景が目に飛び込んできた

  • a literal pink carpet for as far as you could see.

    ピンクフラミンゴが数千羽

  • "That's success," he said.

    目の届く限り カーペットを敷き詰めたよう

  • "Look at their bellies, pink.

    「これだ これこそが成功だ!」と彼は叫んだ

  • They're feasting."

    「あの おなかを見ろよ ピンク色だ」

  • Feasting? I was totally confused.

    「たらふく食べてるんだ」

  • I said, "Miguel, aren't they feasting on your fish?"

    食べてる? 僕は混乱した

  • (Laughter)

    鳥たちの食べてるのは君の魚だよ

  • "Yes," he said.

    (笑)

  • (Laughter)

    「そのとおりさ!」

  • "We lose 20 percent of our fish

    (笑)

  • and fish eggs to birds.

    「ここでは魚と魚卵の」

  • Well, last year, this property

    「20%を鳥に食べられるんだ」

  • had 600,000 birds on it,

    「昨年ここには」

  • more than 250 different species.

    「60万羽の鳥がいた」

  • It's become, today, the largest

    「250種以上だ」

  • and one of the most important

    「現在 ここは ヨーロッパ最大で」

  • private bird sanctuaries in all of Europe."

    「もっとも重要な」

  • I said, "Miguel, isn't a thriving bird population

    「個人所有の 野鳥の楽園になっている」

  • like the last thing you want on a fish farm?"

    鳥が繁殖するということは

  • (Laughter)

    君がもっとも嫌うべきことじゃないのかい?

  • He shook his head, no.

    (笑)

  • He said, "We farm extensively,

    彼は頭を振って 「ちがうね」

  • not intensively.

    「ここでは粗放的な養殖をしている」

  • This is an ecological network.

    「集約的な養殖じゃない」

  • The flamingos eat the shrimp.

    「これは生態系のネットワークなんだ」

  • The shrimp eat the phytoplankton.

    「フラミンゴがエビを食べ」

  • So the pinker the belly,

    「エビが植物プランクトンを食べる」

  • the better the system."

    「だから おなかがピンクであればあるほど」

  • Okay, so let's review:

    「生態系は健全ってわけさ」

  • a farm that doesn't feed its animals,

    じゃあ ここで復習だ

  • and a farm that measures its success

    この養魚場は 魚に餌をやらない

  • on the health of its predators.

    養魚場はその成功の度合いを

  • A fish farm, but also a bird sanctuary.

    魚の天敵の健康状態で計る

  • Oh, and by the way, those flamingos,

    養魚場でありながら 野鳥の楽園

  • they shouldn't even be there in the first place.

    そうそう あのフラミンゴたちは