Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • Imagine a police lineup where ten witnesses are asked to identify a bank robber they glimpsed fleeing the crime scene.

    警察の面通しを思い浮かべてください。事件現場から逃走する銀行強盗を一瞬見かけた10人の目撃者が、犯人の特定をして欲しいと頼まれています。

  • If six of them pick out the same person, there's a good chance that's the real culprit, and if all ten make the same choice, you might think the case is rock-solid, but you'd be wrong.

    目撃者のうち 6 人が同じ人物を選べば、その人物が真犯人である可能性は高いし、もし 10 人全員が同じ人物を選べば、もう間違いないと思うかもしれません。でも、そうではないでしょう。

  • For most of us, this sounds pretty strange.

    ほとんどの人は、おかしいと感じますよね。

  • After all, much of our society relies on majority vote and consensus, whether it's politics, business, or entertainment.

    結局、私たちの社会の多くは、多数決や世論に頼っています。それが政治やビジネス、芸能界であってもです。

  • So it's natural to think that more consensus is a good thing.

    つまり、より意見が一致している方が良いと考えるのは自然なこと。

  • And up until a certain point, it usually is.

    そして、それはたいてい、ある程度まで事実です。

  • But sometimes, the closer you start to get to total agreement, the less reliable the result becomes.

    ただ、満場一致に近づくほど、その結果の信用性が低くなる場合もあります。

  • This is called the paradox of unanimity.

    これを「満場一致のパラドックス」と言います。

  • The key to understanding this apparent paradox is in considering the overall level of uncertainty involved in the type of situation you're dealing with.

    このパラドックスを理解する上で重要な鍵は、対処する状況の不確実性の水準を総合的に考慮することにあります。

  • If we asked witnesses to identify the apple in this lineup, for example, we shouldn't be surprised by a unanimous verdict.

    例えば、この並びで目撃者たちがリンゴを選んでくださいと言われたら、満場一致になっても驚かないでしょう。

  • But in cases where we have reason to expect some natural variance, we should also expect varied distribution.

    ですが、ある程度の相違があることを予測する判断力があれば、回答に幅が出ることも予測できるはずです。

  • If you toss a coin one hundred times, you would expect to get heads somewhere around 50% of the time.

    コイントスを 100 回した場合、表が出る可能性は 50% あたりだと予測するでしょう。

  • But if your results started to approach 100% heads, you'd suspect that something was wrong, not with your individual flips, but with the coin itself.

    でも、表の出る確率が 100% に近づいていったら、何かおかしいと思うはず。自分の投げ方に対してではなく、コインそのものにです。

  • Of course, suspect identifications aren't as random as coin tosses, but they're not as clear-cut as telling apples from bananas, either.

    もちろん、容疑者の特定はコイントスほど無作為ではありません。ですが、バナナとリンゴを見分けるほど分かりやすくもありません。

  • In fact, a 1994 study found that up to 48% of witnesses tend to pick the wrong person out of a lineup, even when many are confident in their choice.

    実際に、1994 年の調査では目撃者の最大 48% が違う人を選ぶ傾向があったことが分かっています。目撃者の多くが自分の選択に自信があった場合ですらです。

  • Memory based on short glimpses can be unreliable, and we often overestimate our own accuracy.

    ほんの一瞬見たことに基づいた記憶は信頼できないこともあります。そして多くの場合、私たちは自分の正確さを過大評価しているのです。

  • Knowing all this, a unanimous identification starts to seem less like certain guilt, and more like a systemic error, or bias in the lineup.

    これを踏まえると、全員の認識が一致するのは、確実に有罪というよりは、系統誤差(何かしらの原因があって生じた誤り)か、容疑者の顔ぶれに偏りがあったように思えてきます。

  • And systemic errors don't just appear in matters of human judgement.

    さらに、系統誤差は人間の判断で生じるものではありません。

  • From 1993-2008, the same female DNA was found in multiple crime scenes around Europe, incriminating an elusive killer dubbed the Phantom of Heilbronn.

    1993 年から 2008 年にかけて、同じ女性の DNA がヨーロッパ各地の複数の犯罪現場で見つかり、神出鬼没の殺人鬼の仕業であるとされました。通称ハイルブロンの怪人です。

  • But the DNA evidence was so consistent precisely because it was wrong.

    ですが、その証拠 DNA はあまりにも矛盾がなさ過ぎました。なぜなら、それは間違っていたからです。

  • It turned out that the cotton swabs used to collect the DNA samples had all been accidentally contaminated by a woman working in the swab factory.

    実は、DNA の検体を集めるために使われた綿棒は、綿棒工場で働いていた女性がうっかり汚染して(素手で触れて)いたことが分かったのです。

  • In other cases, systematic errors arise through deliberate fraud, like the presidential referendum held by Saddam Hussein in 2002, which claimed a turnout of 100% of voters with all 100% supposedly voting in favor of another seven-year term.

    別のケースで言うと、計画的詐欺で系統誤差が生じています。例えば 2002 年にサダム・フセインが行った大統領信任投票では、投票率が有権者の 100% であったことと、投票の 100% が引き続き 7 年の信任を支持しただろうとされました。

  • When you look at it this way, the paradox of unanimity isn't actually all that paradoxical.

    改めてこれを見た場合、満場一致のパラドックスは、実はそこまでおかしなことではありません。

  • Unanimous agreement is still theoretically ideal, especially in cases when you'd expect very low odds of variability and uncertainty, but in practice, achieving it in situations where perfect agreement is highly unlikely, should tell us that there's probably some hidden factor affecting the system.

    満場一致の合意はやはり理論的に理想的です。特にばらつきがあったり、不正確である可能性がものすごく低いと考えられる場合はそうでしょう。でも実際は、完全に意見が一致する可能性がほとんどない状況で満場一致となった場合、おそらく隠れた何かが影響していることが示されているはずです。

  • Although we may strive for harmony and consensus, in many situations, error and disagreement should be naturally expected.

    私たちは調和や意見の一致を目指していますが、様々な状況下で誤りや意見の不一致が予測されるのは当然のことです。

  • And if a perfect result seems too good to be true, it probably is.

    そして、完璧な結果が出て、そんなに素晴らしいことが起こるわけがないと感じたら、たぶんそれは事実でしょう。

Imagine a police lineup where ten witnesses are asked to identify a bank robber they glimpsed fleeing the crime scene.

警察の面通しを思い浮かべてください。事件現場から逃走する銀行強盗を一瞬見かけた10人の目撃者が、犯人の特定をして欲しいと頼まれています。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級 日本語 TED-Ed 証人 一致 容疑 同意 矛盾

【TED-Ed】「みんなと一緒」を信じるべきか? (Should you trust unanimous decisions? - Derek Abbott)

  • 32309 2693
    Lala Haha に公開 2017 年 06 月 26 日
動画の中の単語