Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • So, I'll start with this... a couple of years ago, an event planner called me

    さて、ここからが本題ですが、数年前にイベントプランナーの方から電話があり

  • because I was going to do a speaking event and she called and she said,

    というのも、私が講演会をすることになって、彼女から電話があって、彼女が言ったからです。

  • "I'm really struggling with how to write about you on the little flier."

    "チラシにあなたのことをどう書こうか本当に悩んでいます"

  • And I thought, "well what's the stuggle?" And she said, "Well, I saw you speak

    私は思ったの "何の苦労があるんだ?"ってすると彼女は言った "あなたが話しているのを見たわ

  • I'm gonna call you a researcher I think but I'm afraid if I call you a researcher no one will come because they'll think you're boring and irrelevant (audience laughter)

    あなたを研究者と呼ぶつもりだけど、研究者と呼んだら誰も来ないんじゃないかな、つまらない、無関係だと思われてしまうから(会場笑

  • And, I was like "Okay." And she said,

    で、私は「わかった」って言ったの彼女は言ったんだ

  • "Well the thing I liked about your talk

    "君の話で気に入ったのは

  • is that you're a story teller.So I think what I'll do is call you a story teller."

    "あなたはストーリーテラーだから" "私はあなたをストーリーテラーと呼ぶわ"

  • And of course the academic, insecure part of me was like- "you're gonna call me a what?" (audience laughter)

    もちろん私の中のアカデミックで不安な部分は "あなたは私を何と呼ぶの?"って感じだったわ(観客の笑い声)

  • "you're gonna call me a what?" (audience laughter)

    "あなたは私を何と呼ぶつもりですか?"(観客の笑い声)

  • And she said, "I'm gonna call you a story teller." And I was like, "Oh,

    彼女は "あなたをストーリーテラーと呼ぶわ "と言ったの私は "ああ "と思った

  • pfft why not magic pixie." (lots of laughter)

    "魔法のピクシーじゃないの?"(たくさんの笑い声)

  • I was like-

    私は...

  • "let me think about this for a second."

    "ちょっと考えさせてくれ"

  • And so, I tried to call deep on my courage

    だから、私は自分の勇気を深く求めようとしました。

  • and I thought

    と私は考えました。

  • Well, you know I am a storyteller. I'm a qualitative researcher.

    私が語り部であることはご存知の通りです。私は質的研究者です

  • I collect stories, that's what I do.

    私は物語を集めています、それが私の仕事です。

  • And maybe stories are just data with a soul. Ya know and maybe I'm just a storyteller.

    物語には魂が宿っているのかもしれない私はただの語り部なのかもしれない

  • So I said, "You know what?

    だから私はこう言ったのです。

  • Why don't you just say I'm a researcher/storyteller." And she went, "Ah-ha-ha (imitates loud laugh)! There's no such thing."

    "私は研究者・ストーリーテラーです "って言えばいいじゃないですか。"あはははは(大声で笑う真似をする)!"そんなものはない"

  • So I'm a researcher/storyteller.

    だから私は研究者・語り部なんです。

  • And I'm going to talk to you today, we're talking about expanded perception

    今日は拡大知覚についての話をします

  • And so I want to talk to you and tell you some stories about a piece of my research

    そこで、私の研究の一部の話をしたいと思います。

  • that fundamentally expanded my perception

    私の認識を根本的に広げてくれた

  • and really actually changed the way that

    を実際に変えてみました。

  • I live and love and work and parent.

    私は生きていて、愛していて、働いていて、親になっています。

  • And this is where my story starts...

    そして、ここからが私の物語の始まりです...。

  • When I was young researcher/doctoral student.

    若い研究者・博士課程の学生の頃。

  • My first year, I had a

    私の1年目には

  • research professor who on

    研究者

  • one of his first days of class said, "Here's the thing- if you cannot measure it, it doesn't exist."

    最初の授業の日に彼は言った "測定できなければ存在しない "と

  • And I thought he was just sweet talking me,

    彼は私に甘い言葉をかけているだけだと思っていました。

  • I was like- "Really?" And he said, "Absolutely."

    私は "本当に?"って言ったの彼は "絶対に "と言ったわ

  • And so you have to understand that I have a Batchelors in Social Work, a Masters in Social Work and I was getting my PhD in Social Work.

    私はソーシャルワークのバチェラー、ソーシャルワークの修士号を持っていて、ソーシャルワークの博士号を取得していたことを理解しなければなりません。

  • So my entire academic career was surrounded by people who kind of believed the whole "life's messy, love it."

    私の学歴の全ては、"人生は面倒くさい、好きになれ "と信じている人たちに囲まれていました。

  • And I'm more the "life's messy, clean it up." (audience giggles)

    そして、私はもっと "人生はめちゃくちゃだ、片付けろ "と言っている。(観客の笑い声)

  • "Organize it and put it into a bento box." (more laughter)

    "整理してお弁当箱に入れる"(さらに笑)

  • And so to think I had found my way, found a career

    自分の道を見つけたと思うと キャリアを見つけたと思うと

  • that takes me... you know one of the big sayings in social work is "lean into the discomfort of the work"

    ソーシャルワークの大きな格言の一つに「仕事の不快感に身を乗り出す」というのがありますよね。

  • and I'm more "knock discomfort upside the head and move it over and get all A's." That was my mantra. (audience laughs)

    私はもっと "不快感を叩きのめして移動させて全てのA'sを得る"それが私のマントラでした(観客の笑い声)

  • So I was very excited about this and so I thought, this is the career for me because I am interested

    私はこれにとても興味を持っていたので、これは私にとってのキャリアだと思いました。

  • in some messy topics but I want to be able to make them, not messy.

    一部のごちゃごちゃした話題ではありますが、ごちゃごちゃした話題ではなく、作れるようになりたいです。

  • I want to understand them. I want to hack into these things

    彼らを理解したい私はこれらのものに侵入したい

  • that I know are important and lay the code out for everyone to see.

    私が知っている重要なことは、誰もが見ることができるようにコードをレイアウトします。

  • So where I started was with connection.

    だから、どこから始めたかというと、つながりがあったんです。

  • Because by the time you're a social worker for ten years what you realize is

    社会福祉士になって10年が経つ頃には、気付いていることは

  • that connection is why we're here.

    その繋がりがあるからこそ ここにいるんだ

  • It's what gives purpose and meaning to our lives.

    それは私たちの人生に目的と意味を与えるものです。

  • It doesn't matter whether you talk to people who work in social justice and mental health and abusive and neglect.

    社会正義や精神衛生で働いている人に話をしても、虐待やネグレクトをしていても関係ありません。

  • That connection, the ability to feel connected, is neurobiologically how we're wired. That's why we're here.

    その繋がり、繋がりを感じる能力は 神経生物学的にどうやって配線されているかです。 それが私たちがここにいる理由です。

  • So I thought, "I'll start with connection."

    だから、"つながりから始めよう "と思ったんです。

  • Well you know that situation where you get an evaluation from your boss...

    まあ、上司から評価を受けるという状況を知っていますよね...。

  • And she tells you 37 things that you do really awesome and one thing that you kinda, ya know the "opportunity for growth"?

    そして、彼女はあなたが本当に素晴らしいことをする37のことを教えてくれますし、あなたがちょっと、あなたが知っている「成長の機会」を知っていることを一つのこと?

  • (audience laughs)

    (会場の笑い声)

  • And all you can think about is that "opportunity for growth," right?

    そして、その「成長の機会」のことしか考えられないんですよね?

  • Well, apparently this is the way my work went as well.

    まあ、どうやら私の仕事もこんな感じだったようです。

  • Because when you ask people about love

    だって、人に恋愛のことを聞くと

  • They tell you about heartbreak.

    失恋の話をしてくれる

  • When you ask them about belonging,

    帰属意識について聞くと

  • They'll tell you about the most excruciating experiences of being excluded.

    排除された時の最も耐え難い経験を話してくれる。

  • And when you ask people about connection,

    そして、人とのつながりを聞くと

  • The stories they told me were about disconnection.

    聞かされた話は、断捨離の話でした。

  • So very quickly (about six weeks into my research), I ran into this unnamed thing

    だからとても早く(研究を始めて約6週間)、私はこの名前のないものに出くわしました。

  • that absolutely unraveled connection. In a way that I didn't understand or had never seen.

    繋がりを絶対に解きほぐしてくれました 私には理解できない、見たこともないような形で。

  • And so I pulled back out of the research and said, "I need to figure out what this is."

    それで私は研究から手を引いて "これが何なのか解明する必要がある "と言ったんです

  • And it turned out to be shame.

    そして、それは恥ということになった。

  • It turned out that -and shame is really easily understood as the fear of disconnection-

    恥は断絶の恐怖として本当に簡単に理解できることがわかりました。

  • is there's something about me that if other people know it or see it, that I won't be worthy of connection.

    他の人がそれを知っているか、それを見ている場合は、私は接続する価値がないことを私について何かがあります。

  • The things I can tell you about it is: - it's universal, we all have it.

    私が言えることは- それは普遍的なもので、私たちは皆それを持っています。

  • The only people who don't experience shame have no capacity for human empathy or connection.

    羞恥心を経験していない人に限って、人間の共感能力や繋がりがない。

  • - No one wants to talk about it and the less you talk about it, the more you have it.

    - 誰もその話をしたがらないし、その話をしなければしないほど持っている。

  • What underpinned this shame, this "I'm not good enough" - which we all know that feeling, that "I'm not _____ enough, I'm not thin enough,

    何がこの恥の根底にあるのか、この "私は十分ではない" - 私たちは皆、その感覚を知っている、"私は十分に______ではない、私は十分に痩せていない "ということ。

  • rich enough, smart enough, promoted enough"...

    十分な金持ち、十分な頭脳、十分な昇進」...

  • The thing that underpinned this was, this excruciating vulnerability.

    それを支えていたのは、この耐え難いほどの脆弱性だった。

  • This idea of "in order for connection to happen, we have to allow ourselves to be seen," really seen.

    この「つながりが起こるためには、自分を見られるようにしなければならない」という考え方は、本当に見られています。

  • And you know how I feel about vulnerability, I HATE vulnerability.

    脆弱性をどう思ってるか知ってる?私は脆弱性が嫌いなの

  • And so I thought, this is my chance to beat it back with my measuring stick.

    それで、これは私のメジャーで打ち返すチャンスだと思ったんです。

  • I'm going in. And I'm gonna figure this stuff out, I'm gonna spend a year.

    中に入ってそして、これを解決するために1年かけて

  • I'm gonna totally deconstruct shame, I'm gonna understand how vulnerability works and I'm gonna outsmart it.

    恥を完全に解体して 脆弱性の仕組みを理解して それを打ち破るんだ

  • So I was ready and I was really excited!

    なので、準備ができていたので、とても興奮していました!

  • As you know it's not going to turn out well. (laughter)

    ご存知の通り、うまくいかないですね。(笑)

  • (more laughter) You know this.

    (もっと笑)これは知っているでしょう。

  • I could tell you a lot about shame but I'd have to borrow everyone else's time.

    恥ずかしいことはたくさん言えたけど、みんなの時間を借りることになってしまう。

  • But here's what I can tell you it boils down to...

    しかし、ここで言えることは...

  • -and this may be one of the most important things I've learned in the decade of doing this research-

    -そしてこれは、この研究をしてきた10年間で学んだ最も重要なことの一つかもしれません。

  • My one year turned into six years,

    私の1年が6年になりました。

  • thousands of stories, hundreds of long interviews, focus groups -at one point people were sending me their journal pages, their stories- thousands of pieces of data in six years.

    何千もの物語、何百もの長いインタビュー、フォーカスグループ - ある時点では、人々は私に彼らの日記のページや物語を送ってきた - 6年間で何千ものデータの断片。

  • And I kinda got a handle on it, I understood what shame is, how it works.

    恥とは何か、その仕組みを理解した。

  • I wrote a book, I published a theory but something was not okay.

    本を書いて、理論を発表したが、何か大丈夫ではなかった。

  • And what it was, was that if I roughly took the people I interviewed,

    それが何だったかというと、私がインタビューした人たちをざっくり言うと

  • and divided them into people who really have a sense of worthiness (that's what this comes down, a sense of worthiness),

    と、本当に価値観を持っている人たちに分けました(これが降りてきた、価値観)。

  • they have a strong sense of love and belonging.

    彼らは強い愛と帰属意識を持っています。

  • And then the folks who struggle for it, the folks who are always wondering if they're good enough...

    そして、そのためにもがいている人たちは、自分たちでいいのだろうかといつも悩んでいる人たちは

  • there was only one variable that separated the people who had a strong sense of love and belonging, and really struggle for it, and that was

    強い愛と帰属意識を持ち、それを求めて本当にもがいている人たちを分ける変数はただ一つだけでした。

  • the people who have a strong sense of love and belonging, believe that they are worthy of love and belonging. That's it.

    の人は、自分は愛と帰属に値すると信じています。それは、それだけです。

  • They believe they're worthy.

    彼らは自分たちが価値があると信じている

  • And so to me, the hard part of the one thing that keeps us out of connection is our fear that we're not worthy of connection

    そして私にとって 繋がりを断ち切ることの難しい部分は 自分が繋がりを持つ価値がないと 恐れていることなのです

  • was something that personally and professionally I felt like I needed to understand.

    は、個人的にも仕事的にも理解しなければならないことだと感じました。

  • So I took all of the interviews where I saw worthiness, saw people living that way, and just looked at those.

    だから、価値があると思ったインタビューを全部取って、そのように生きている人を見て、それを見ていました。

  • What do these people have in common?

    この人たちの共通点は?

  • I have a slight office supply addiction...that's another talk (laughter).

    ちょっと事務用品依存症なんですが・・・それはまた別の話です(笑)。

  • So I had a manila folder and a sharpie and I was like, "What am I going to call this research?"

    それでマニラフォルダとシャープペンを持っていて "この研究を何と呼ぼうか?"って感じでした

  • And the first words that came to my mind were "wholehearted."

    そして、最初に頭に浮かんだ言葉は "心を込めて "でした。

  • These are kind of wholehearted people living from this deep sense of worthiness.

    この深い価値観から生きている心ある人たちです。

  • So I wrote at the top of the manila folder and I started looking at the data.

    ということで、マニラフォルダの一番上に書いたのですが、データを見始めました。

  • At first in this very intense, four day long analysis, where I went back and pulled all these interviews, stories asking - "What's the theme? What's the pattern?"

    最初は非常に濃密な4日間の分析をしました。すべてのインタビューに戻って、「テーマは何か? テーマは何か?

  • My husband left town with the kids (audience laughs) because I always kinda going into this Jackson Pollock crazy thing.

    夫は子供たちと一緒に町を出て行ったんだけど(観客の笑い声)、僕はいつもジャクソン・ポロックの狂ったようなことをしていたからね。

  • Where I'm just writing and just in my researcher mode.

    書いているだけで、ただの研究者モードになっているところ。

  • And so here's what I found...

    それで見つけたのがこれだ...

  • What they had in common was a sense of courage.

    彼らに共通していたのは「勇気」でした。

  • And I want to separate courage and bravery for you for a moment.

    そして、勇気と勇気を分けてあげたい。

  • Courage, when it first came into the English language (it's from the latin word - cour, meaning heart), the original definition was to tell the story of who you are with your whole heart.

    勇気、それが最初に英語に入ってきたとき(それはラテン語の単語からです - cour、心臓を意味する)、元の定義は、あなたがあなたの心全体で誰であるかの物語を伝えることでした。

  • And so these folks, very simply, had the courage to be imperfect.

    そうして、これらの人々は、非常に単純に、不完全である勇気を持っていました。

  • They had the compassion to be kind to themselves first

    彼らには、まず自分に優しくするという思いやりがありました。

  • and then others and as it turns out we can't practice compassion with other people if we can't treat ourselves kindly.

    そして他の人にも、そしてそれが判明したように、私たちは自分自身を親切に扱うことができない場合は、他の人と思いやりを実践することはできません。

  • And the last was that they had connection- and this was the hard part- as a result of authenticity.

    そして最後に、彼らはつながりを持っていて、これが難しいところでしたが、信憑性の結果として。

  • They were willing to let go of who they thought they should be

    彼らは、自分たちがあるべきだと思っている自分を手放そうとしていました。

  • to be who they were, which you absolutely have to do for connection.

    彼らが何者であったかを知るために、それはあなたが接続のために絶対に行う必要があります。

  • The other thing that they had in common was this-

    もう一つの共通点は、これでした。

  • they fully embraced vulnerability.

    彼らは脆弱性を完全に受け入れていました。

  • They believed that what made them vulnerable, made them beautiful.

    彼らは、彼らを脆弱にしたものが、彼らを美しくすると信じていました。

  • They didn't talk about vulnerability being comfortable nor did they talk about it being excruciating as I had heard earlier in the shame interviewing.

    脆弱性が心地いいという話はしてくれなかったし、先ほどの羞恥面接で聞いたように、耐え難いという話もしてくれませんでした。

  • They just talked about it being necessary.

    必要だという話をしていただけです。

  • They talked about the willingness to say "I love you" first.

    まずは「好きだよ」という意思表示をすることが大事だと話していました。

  • The willingness to do something where there are no guarantees.

    保証のないところでやる気を出すこと。

  • The willingness to breathe through waiting for the doctor to call after their mammogram.

    マンモグラフィ後の医師の電話を待つことで、呼吸をする意思があること。

  • The willing to invest in a relationship that may or may not work out.

    うまくいくかもしれない、いかないかもしれない関係に投資する意思があること。

  • They thought this was fundamental.

    これが基本だと思っていたようです。

  • I personally thought that this was betrayal.

    個人的にはこれは裏切りだと思いました。

  • I could not believe that I'd pledged allegiance to research, where (in our job) the definition of research is to control and predict.

    研究に忠誠を誓ったとは信じられませんでした。研究の定義は、(私たちの仕事では)制御し、予測することです。

  • Study phenomena for the explicit reason to control and predict.

    制御と予測のための明確な理由のために現象を研究する。

  • And now my mission to control and predict had turned up the answer that the way to live is with vulnerability.

    そして今、私のコントロールと予測の使命は、脆弱性を持って生きることだという答えを導き出しました。

  • And to stop controlling and predicting.

    そして、支配と予測をやめること。

  • This led to

    これは

  • a little breakdown (audience laughs)

    小崩し

  • which actually looked more like this -

    実際にはこんな感じでした。

  • (more laughter)

    (もっと笑)

  • And it led to what I called a breakdown and my therapist calling a "spiritual awakening."

    そして、それは私が故障と呼んでいたものにつながったセラピストは "精神的な目覚め "と呼んでいました。

  • (more laughter)

    (もっと笑)

  • Spiritual awakening sounds good but I assure you it was a breakdown.

    霊的覚醒というと聞こえはいいですが、それは故障だったと断言します。

  • I had to put my data away and go find a therapist.

    データを片付けて、セラピストを探しに行くことになった。

  • And let me tell you something, you know who you are when you call you friends and say, "I think I need to see somebody. Do you have any recommendations?"

    友達に電話して "誰かに会った方がいいと思う" と言う時の自分を知っていますか?"お勧めの人は?"

  • Because about five of my friends were like, "Woooh I wouldn't want to be your therapist." (uproars of laughter)

    友達5人くらいが "あなたのセラピストになりたくない "って言ってたわ(笑い声)

  • "What is that?" "You know, I'm just sayin'- don't bring your measuring stick." (more laughter from audience)

    "それは何だ?" "メジャーを持ってくるなと言っただけだ" (会場からの笑い声)

  • (continues to laugh). And so I found a therapist.

    (笑い続けています)。 それで、セラピストを見つけたんです。

  • And in my first meeting with her, Diana, I brought in my list of how the wholehearted live.

    そして、ダイアナという彼女との初対面で、私は心を込めた生き方のリストを持ち込んだ。

  • And she sat down and said, "How are you?"

    彼女は座って言った "元気?"

  • And I said, "I'm okay, I'm great." And she said, "well what's going on?"

    私は "大丈夫だよ、最高だよ "って言ったの彼女は言った "どうしたの?"

  • And this is a therapist who sees therapists because we have to go to those because their B.S. meters are good.

    そして、これはセラピストのB.S.M.がいいから、そういうところに行かないといけないから、セラピストを見ている人です。

  • (laughter)

    (笑)

  • And so I said, "here's the thing, I'm struggling." And she said, "what's the struggle?"

    それで私は言ったんだ "ここからが問題なんだ 苦労してるんだ "って彼女は言った "何がもがいているの?"

  • And I said, "I have a vulnerability issue."

    "私には脆弱性の問題がある "と言ったんだ

  • And I know that vulnerability is the core of shame and fear and our struggle for worthiness

    脆弱性は恥と恐怖の核心であり価値を求める我々の闘いであることを私は知っています

  • but that it's also the birth place of joy, creativity, belonging, love

    喜び、創造性、帰属意識、愛の発祥の地でもあります。

  • and I think I have a problem and I need some help."

    "問題があって助けが必要なんだ"

  • "But here's the thing, no family stuff, no childhood shit, (audience laughs), I just need some strategies. (more laughter)

    "でもここでは家族のことでも 子供の頃のことでもなく(観客の笑い声) 戦略が必要なだけなんです(より多くの笑い)

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • So then she goes like this [nods head up and down].

    そして、彼女はこうなります[頭を上下にうなずく]。

  • "It's bad right?" And she said, "it's neither good nor bad."

    "悪いことだよね?""良くも悪くもない "って言ってて

  • (laughter) It just is what it is.

    (笑)ただそれだけのことです。

  • And I said, "Oh my God, this is gonna SUCK!" (laughter)

    そして私は "なんてことだ、これはクソだ!"と言いました。(笑)

  • And it did and it didn't. And it took about a year.

    そして、それができて、できなかった。 そして、約1年かかりました。

  • And you know how there are people who when they realize that vulnerability and tenderness are important?

    脆弱性と優しさが大事だと気付いた時に、どうやって人がいるか知ってる?

  • A) That's not me and B) I don't even hang out with people like that. (audience laughs)

    A)それは私じゃないし、B)そういう人とは付き合いもしない。(観客の笑い声)

  • For me it was a year long street fight. (laughter)

    私にとっては、1年間のストリートファイトでした。 (笑)

  • It was a slugfest. Vulnerability pushed, I pushed back.

    殴り合いだった脆弱性が押した、私は押し返した。

  • I lost the fight but I won my life back.

    喧嘩には負けたが、人生を取り戻した。

  • Then I went back into the research and spent the next few years really trying to understand what they, the "wholehearted", what the choices they were making

    その後、私は研究に戻り、その後数年をかけて、彼らが何をしているのか、何を選択しているのかを理解しようとしていました。

  • and what are we doing with vulnerability? Why do we struggle with it so much? Am I alone in struggling with vulnerability?

    そして私たちは脆弱性と何をしているのでしょうか? なぜ私たちはそんなにもがいているのでしょうか?脆弱性と格闘しているのは私だけでしょうか?

  • No.

    駄目だ

  • So this is what I learned...

    これが私が学んだことなんですね...。

  • We numb vulnerability.

    脆弱性を麻痺させます。

  • When we're waiting for the call, when we're waiting...

    電話を待っている時、待っている時は

  • You know it was funny, on Wednesday I put something out on twitter and facebook that said, "how would you define vulnerability/what makes you feel vulnerable?"

    水曜日にツイッターとフェイスブックで "脆弱性の定義は?" "何があなたを脆弱に感じさせるのか?"って

  • And in an hour and half I had 150 responses. Because you know I wanted to know...

    1時間半で150件の回答があった 私が知りたかったのは...

  • You know, what's out there?

    外には何があるんだ?

  • "Having to ask my husband for help cuz I'm sick and we're newly married."

    "病気で新婚なのに夫に助けを求めるなんて"

  • "Initiating sex with my wife."

    "妻とのセックスを始めた"

  • "Initiating sex with my husband."

    "夫とのセックスを始めた"

  • "Being turned down." "Asking someone out."

    "断られる""誰かを誘う"

  • "Waiting for the doctor to call back." "Getting laid off."

    "医者からの電話を待っている""解雇される"

  • "Laying off people."

    "人を置くこと"

  • This is the world we live in.

    これが私たちが生きている世界です。

  • We live in a vulnerable world.

    私たちは脆弱な世界に生きています。

  • And one of the ways we deal with it is we numb vulnerability.

    そして、それに対処する方法の一つは、脆弱性を麻痺させることです。

  • And I think there's evidence. And it's not the only reason this evidence exists but it's a huge cause.

    そして、証拠があると思います。そして、この証拠があるからといって、それだけではなく、大きな原因になっています。

  • We are the most in debt,

    一番借金をしているのは私たちです。

  • obese,

    肥満だ

  • addicted and medicated adult cohort in U.S. history.

    米国の歴史における依存症と薬漬けの成人コホート

  • Why? The problem is, and I learned this from the research...

    なぜなのか?問題は、研究してわかったのですが...

  • is that you cannot selectively numb emotion.

    感情を選択的に麻痺させることはできないということです。

  • You can't say, "here's all the bad stuff- vulnerability, here's grief, shame, fear, disappointment- I don't want to feel these.

    あなたは、「ここにはすべての悪いものがあります-脆弱性、ここには悲しみ、恥、恐怖、失望-私はこれらを感じたくありません」と言うことはできません。

  • I'm gonna have a few beers and a banana nut muffin.

    ビールを飲んでバナナナッツマフィンを食べよう

  • (laugher) I don't wanna feel these!

    (笑)これは感じたくないですね!

  • And I know that's knowing laughter, I hack into your lives for a living (more laughter). That's "ah-ha-ha God!"

    そしてそれは知っている笑いです 私は生活のためにあなたの人生にハックしています(もっと笑)。 それが "あはははは神!"です。

  • (more laughter) You can't numb those hard feelings without numbing the other affects. You cannot selectively numb.

    他の影響を麻痺させずに 辛い感情を麻痺させることはできません選択的に麻痺させることはできません

  • So when you numb those, we can't numb without numbing joy.

    だから、それらを麻痺させるときには、喜びを麻痺させないと麻痺させることができないんです。

  • We numb gratitude, we numb happiness.

    感謝の気持ちを麻痺させ、幸せを麻痺させる。

  • And then, we are miserable and we're looking for purpose and meaning

    そして、私たちは惨めで、目的と意味を探しています。

  • and then we feel vulnerable and so we look for a couple of beers and a banana nut muffin. And it becomes this dangerous cycle.

    そして、私たちは弱さを感じて、ビールとバナナナッツマフィンを探します。そして、それが危険なサイクルになる。

  • One of the things that I think we need to think about is- why and how we numb.

    私たちが考える必要があると思うことの一つは、なぜ、どのようにして麻痺してしまうのかということです。

  • And it doesn't just have to be addiction.

    そして、それは中毒だけではありません。

  • The other thing we do is make everything that's uncertain, certain.

    もう一つは、不確かなものは全て確実なものにすることです。

  • Religion has gone from a belief in faith and mystery to certainty.

    宗教は、信仰や神秘を信じることから、確実性を信じることへと変化してきました。

  • "I'm right, you're wrong. Shut up."

    "私は正しく、あなたは間違っている。黙れ!"

  • That's it. The more afraid we are, the more vulnerable we are, the more afraid we are.

    それだけだよ。 怖ければ怖いほど、弱気になってしまう。

  • Look at politics today, there's no discourse any more, there's no conversation. There's just blame.

    今日の政治を見てください、もう言論はありません、会話もありません。ただ非難されるだけだ

  • You know how blame is described in our research? "A way to discharge pain and discomfort."

    研究で「非難」がどう表現されているか知っていますか? "痛みや不快感を排出する方法"

  • We perfect.

    我々は完璧だ

  • Now let me tell you, if there's anyone who wants to have their life look like this, it would be me. But it doesn't work.

    言っておくが、自分の人生をこんな風にしたいと思う人がいるとしたら、それは私だろう。しかし、それはうまくいかない。

  • Because what we take fat from our butts and put it into our cheeks.

    お尻から脂肪を取って頬に入れるものだから。