Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • On simplicity. What a great way to start.

    シンプリシティーについて。話を始めるにはとても良い題材です。

  • First of all, I've been watching this trend

    まず始めに、私は例えば「アホでもわかるシリーズ」といった本に

  • where we have these books like such and such "For Dummies."

    まつわるトレンドを追いかけていました。

  • Do you know these books, these such and such "For Dummies?"

    「アホでもわかるシリーズ」といった本をご存知でしょうか。

  • My daughters pointed out that I'm very similar looking, so this is a bit of a problem.

    顔がとても似ていると私の娘達が指摘したので、そこが少々問題です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But I was looking online at Amazon.com for other books like this.

    それはさておき、私はアマゾン ドット コム でこのような本を探していました。

  • You know, there's also something called the "Complete Idiot's Guide?"

    他にも「完全アホガイド」というものが存在することをご存知でしょうか。

  • There's a sort of business model around being stupid in some sense.

    このように、ある意味でアホの周りにビジネスモデルがあるようです。

  • We like to have technology make us feel bad, for some strange reason.

    どういうわけか、テクノロジーに気分を害されることが好まれるのです。

  • But I really like that, so I wrote a book called "The Laws of Simplicity."

    でも、私はそういう考えを気に入っていたので、「シンプリシティーの法則」という本を書きました。

  • I was in Milan last week, for the Italian launch.

    イタリア語版の出版のため、私は先週ミラノにいました。

  • It's kind of a book about questions, questions about simplicity.

    それは、シンプリシティーにおける疑問に関する本です。

  • Very few answers. I'm also wondering myself, what is simplicity?

    答えはまだ少ないです。私自身も「シンプリシティーとは何か。」と考えます。

  • Is it good? Is it bad? Is complexity better? I'm not sure.

    それは良いものか。それとも悪いものか。コンプレクシティーの方が良いのか。私には分かりません。

  • After I wrote "The Laws of Simplicity,"

    「シンプリシティーの法則」を執筆し終えた後、

  • I was very tired of simplicity, as you can imagine.

    皆さんが想像するように、私はシンプリシティーについて考えるのに飽きてしまいました。

  • And so in my life, I've discovered that

    これまでの私の人生において、どんなやり手の人にとっても

  • vacation is the most important skill for any kind of over-achiever.

    休暇の過ごし方が最重要のスキルであることに気付いていました。

  • Because your companies will always take away your life,

    なぜなら、皆さんの会社はいつも皆さんの人生を奪っていますが、

  • but they can never take away your vacation -- in theory.

    休暇を奪うことは絶対にできません。理論的には。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So, I went to the Cape last summer to hide from simplicity,

    そこで、私は、昨年の夏に「シンプリシティー」から離れようとケープ コッドに行ったのですが、

  • and I went to the Gap, because I only have black pants.

    黒いズボンしかなかったので、Gapに立ち寄りました。

  • So I went and bought khaki shorts or whatever,

    そこで、カーキ色の短パンなどを購入したのですが、

  • and unfortunately, their branding was all about "Keep It Simple."

    不運にも、Gapのキャッチフレーズは「シンプルでいよう」というものでした。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I opened up a magazine, and Visa's branding was,

    雑誌を開けば、Visaのキャッチフレーズは、

  • "Business Takes Simplicity."

    「ビジネスはシンプリシティーを選ぶ」

  • I develop photographs, and Kodak said, "Keep It Simple."

    写真を現像すると、Kodakは、「シンプルでいよう」と訴えます。

  • So, I felt kind of weird that simplicity was sort of following me around.

    まるで私がシンプリシティーに追いかけ回されているような奇妙な気分でした。

  • So, I turned on the TV, and I don't watch TV very much,

    そこで、私は普段テレビを見ないのですが、テレビをつけたところ、

  • but you know this person? This is Paris Hilton, apparently.

    この人 -- パリス ヒルトンですが、

  • And she has this show, "The Simple Life."

    彼女が「シンプルライフ」という番組に出演していたのです。

  • So I watched this. It's not very simple, a little bit confusing.

    番組を見てみたのですが、シンプルどころか、むしろ少々込み入ったものでした。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So, I looked for a different show to watch.

    別の番組を見ようと、

  • So, I opened up this TV Guide thing,

    テレビガイドなどを開いてみたところ、

  • and on the E! channel, this "Simple Life" show is very popular.

    E!チャネルでは、この「シンプルライフ」がとても評判らしく、

  • They'll play it over, and over, and over.

    何度も何度も放送されていました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So it was traumatizing, actually.

    トラウマになりそうだったので、

  • So, I wanted to escape again, so I went out to my car.

    私はまたシンプリシティーから逃げ出そうと、車に乗り込みました。

  • And Cape Cod, there are idyllic roads, and all of us can drive in this room.

    ケープ コッドでは、のどかな道路があって、こんなところで運転する事ができます。

  • And when you drive, these signs are very important.

    そして、運転する時、このような標識はとても重要です。

  • It's a very simple sign, it says, "road" and "road approaching."

    とてもシンプルな標識で、「道路」と「道路接近中」を表しています。

  • So I'm mostly driving along, okay, and then I saw this sign.

    それらを見ながら運転していたある時、こんな標識を見ました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So, I thought complexity was attacking me suddenly,

    コンプレクシティーが突如として私に攻撃をしかけてきたと思ったのです。

  • so I thought, "Ah, simplicity. Very important."

    そして私は、「シンプリシティーはやはり重要だな」と思ったのです。

  • But then I thought, "Oh, simplicity. What would that be like on a beach?

    それでは、ビーチの場合、どういうシンプリシティーが考えられるでしょうか。

  • What if the sky was 41 percent gray? Wouldn't that be the perfect sky?"

    もし空が41パーセント灰色であるなら、完璧な空になるのではないでしょうか。

  • I mean that simplicity sky.

    この場合、シンプリシティーに従った空のことを指します。

  • But in reality, the sky looked like this. It was a beautiful, complex sky.

    しかし、現実には空はこのように見えます。美しく、複雑な空です。

  • You know, with the pinks and blues. We can't help but love complexity.

    空にはピンクや青などの色が現れます。このように、私たちはコンプレクシティーを愛してやみません。

  • We're human beings: we love complex things.

    私たちは人間です。私たちは複雑なものが好きなのです。

  • We love relationships -- very complex. So we love this kind of stuff.

    私たちは関係を築くのが好きです。私たちはとても複雑な存在であり、このようなことが大好きなのです。

  • I'm at this place called the Media Lab.

    私は、メディア ラボという場所に所属しています。

  • Maybe some of you guys have heard of this place.

    この場所について聞いたことがある方もいらっしゃると思います。

  • It's designed by I. M. Pei, one of the premier modernist architects.

    ここは、有名な現代建築家の一人である、I.M.ペイによってデザインされました。

  • Modernism means white box, and it's a perfect white box.

    モダニズムとは、白い箱という意味です。ここは完璧な白い箱です。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And some of you guys are entrepreneurs, etc., whatever.

    皆さんの中には起業家の方などもいらっしゃることでしょう。

  • Last month, I was at Google, and, boy, that cafeteria, man.

    先月、私がグーグルを訪れた時、いやしかし、あのカフェテリアといったら...

  • You guys have things here in Silicon Valley like stock options.

    皆さんはここ、シリコンバレーではストックオプションなどをもらうでしょうが、

  • See, in academia, we get titles, lots of titles.

    アカデミアでは、沢山の肩書きをもらいます。

  • Last year at TED, these were all my titles. I had a lot of titles.

    昨年TEDで講演したときは、私の肩書きはこんな風でした。たくさんの肩書きですね。

  • I have a default title as a father of a bunch of daughters.

    デフォルトの肩書きですが、うちの娘達の父親でもあります。

  • This year at TED, I'm happy to report that I have new titles,

    今年のTEDでは、私の過去の肩書きに追加して、

  • in addition to my previous titles.

    新しい肩書きを持つことを報告でき、とてもうれしく思っています。

  • Another "Associate Director of Research."

    新しい共同研究責任者と、

  • And this also happened, so I have five daughters now.

    こんなことも起きました。娘は全部で5人になりました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • That's my baby Reina. (Applause) Thank you.

    これが私の子供のレイナです。ありがとうございます。

  • And so, my life is much more complex because of the baby, actually,

    私の人生は、子供が生まれたことによって、より複雑になっています。

  • but that's okay. We will still stay married, I think.

    でもそれは問題ありません。私と妻との結婚生活はこれからも続いていくことと思います。

  • But looking way back, when I was a child --

    私が子供だった頃を振り返ってみたいと思います。

  • you see, I grew up in a tofu factory in Seattle.

    私はシアトルの豆腐屋さんで育ちました。

  • Many of you may not like tofu because you haven't had good tofu,

    多くの皆さんは、おいしい豆腐を食べた事がない為か、豆腐を好きでないと思いますが、

  • but tofu's a good food. It's a very simple kind of food.

    豆腐はとてもおいしいです。とてもシンプルな食べ物です。

  • It's very hard work to make tofu.

    豆腐を作るのは大変な労力が必要です。

  • As a child, we used to wake up at 1 a.m. and work till 6 p.m., six days a week.

    子供の頃、一週間のうち六日は、夜の一時から、夕方の六時まで働きました。

  • My father was kind of like Andy Grove, paranoid of the competition.

    私の父はアンディー グローブのように、競争に対して極度の心配性だった人でした。

  • So often, seven days a week. Family business equals child labor.

    なので、たびたび週に七日。家業とは児童の就労を意味しますが、

  • We were a great model. So, I loved going to school.

    うちはそのモデルそのものでした。そこで、私は学校に行くのがとても好きになりました。

  • School was great, and maybe going to school

    学校は最高で、多分学校に行く事が、

  • helped me get to this Media Lab place, I'm not sure.

    私をこのメディア ラボへ導く手助けになったのかもしれません。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • But the Media Lab is an interesting place, and it's important to me

    メディア ラボはとても興味深い場所であり、私にとってとても重要な場所でもありました。

  • because as a student, I was a computer science undergrad,

    なぜなら私は、当時コンピューターサイエンスの学部生で、

  • and I discovered design later on in my life.

    後の人生でデザインに関わる事になったからです。

  • And there was this person, Muriel Cooper.

    ミュリエル クーパーという人物がいました。

  • Who knows Muriel Cooper? Muriel Cooper?

    ミュリエル クーパーをご存知の方はいますか。

  • Wasn't she amazing? Muriel Cooper. She was wacky.

    驚くべき女性だと思いませんか。ミュリエル クーパーは奇抜な人でした。

  • And she was a TEDster, exactly, and she showed us,

    彼女もTED関係者で、

  • she showed the world how to make the computer beautiful again.

    世界に向けて、コンピューターを美しい存在に戻す方法を示しました。

  • And she's very important in my life,

    彼女は私の人生においてとても大切な人でした。

  • because she's the one that told me to leave MIT and go to art school.

    なぜなら、私にMITを出て、美術学校への進学を勧めくれた人物だからです。

  • It was the best advice I ever got. So I went to art school, because of her.

    私の人生の中で最高の助言でした。ですので、彼女のおかげで私は美術学校に進学したのです。

  • She passed away in 1994,

    彼女は、1994年に亡くなり、

  • and I was hired back to MIT to try to fill her shoes, but it's so hard.

    私は彼女の後任としてMITに戻りましたが、彼女の偉大さにはいつも頭が下がります。

  • This amazing person, Muriel Cooper.

    まったくミュリエル クーパーは驚くべき人物です。

  • When I was in Japan -- I went to an art school in Japan --

    私が日本の、美術学校に進学した際、

  • I had a nice sort of situation, because somehow I was connected to Paul Rand.

    私は恵まれていました。何はともあれ、ポール ランドと出会う事ができたからです。

  • Some of you guys know Paul Rand,

    皆さんの中にはポール ランドをご存知の方もいるでしょう。

  • the greatest graphic designer -- I'm sorry -- out there.

    最も偉大なグラフィックデザイナー、そこの方、申し訳ない、

  • The great graphic designer Paul Rand

    最も偉大なグラフィックデザイナーであるポール ランドは、

  • designed the IBM logo, the Westinghouse logo.

    IBMのロゴや、ウェスティングハウスのロゴなどをデザインした人物で、

  • He basically said, "I've designed everything."

    彼は基本的に「私はありとあらゆるものをデザインした」と言っていました。

  • And also Ikko Tanaka was a very important mentor in my life --

    そして、日本のポール ランド、田中一光は、私の人生にとって

  • the Paul Rand of Japan. He designed most of the major icons of Japan,

    大変重要なメンターでした。彼は、日本において

  • like Issey Miyake's brand and also Muji.

    ISSEY MIYAKEや、MUJIなどといったよく知られたシンボルの多くをデザインしました。

  • When you have mentors -- and yesterday,

    先日、カリーム アブドゥル ジャバーが

  • Kareem Abdul-Jabbar talked about mentors,

    メンターについて紹介していましたが、

  • these people in your life -- the problem with mentors is that they all die.

    人生においてメンターを持つと、問題なのは彼らがいずれ亡くなることです。

  • This is a sad thing, but it's actually a happy thing in a way,

    これは、悲しいことですが、一方では、喜ばしいことでもあるのです。

  • because you can remember them in their pure form.

    なぜなら彼らを純粋な形で思い出す事が出来るからです。

  • I think that the mentors that we all meet sort of humanize us.

    我々が出会うメンターは、私たちに人間性を与えてくれるように思います。

  • When you get older, and you're all freaked out, whatever,

    歳を取り、無茶な事をしでかそうとすると、

  • the mentors calm us down.

    メンター達は私達を冷静にさせてくれます。

  • And I'm grateful for my mentors, and I'm sure all of you are too.

    私は、メンター達にとても感謝をしています。きっと皆さんも同じでしょう。

  • Because the human thing is very hard when you're at MIT.

    なぜなら、MITにいる時は、あまり人間性に関することに触れる事はありません。

  • The T doesn't stand for "human," it stands for "technology."

    Tは、「人間」ではなく、「テクノロジー」を指します。

  • And because of that, I always wondered about this human thing.

    そんなわけで、私はいつも「人間性」について考えていました。

  • So, I've always been Googling this word, "human,"

    そこで私はずっと、この「人間」という言葉をグーグル検索して

  • to find out how many hits I get.

    どれだけヒット数を得られるか調べてきました。

  • And in 2001, I had 26 million hits, and for "computer,"

    2001年には、2600万ヒットを得た一方、

  • because computers are against humans a bit,

    人間性に少々反しているコンピューターは、

  • I have 42 million hits. Let me do an Al Gore here.

    4200万ヒットでした。ここでアル ゴア風にやらせてください。

  • So, if you sort of compare that, like this,

    このように比較することで、

  • you'll see that computer versus human --

    「コンピューター」対「人間」は、

  • I've been tracking this for the last year --

    これを昨年まで追っていくと、

  • computer versus human over the last year has changed.

    昨年における「コンピューター」対「人間」の比率は変化しました。

  • It used to be kind of two to one. Now, humans are catching up.

    前までは2倍以上の差があったものが、最近になって人間が追いついて来ています。

  • Very good, us humans! We're catching up with the computers.

    私たち人間も頑張っています。私達はコンピューターと肩を並べ始めました。

  • In the simplicity realm, it's also interesting.

    シンプリシティーの世界でも、興味深いことが起きています。

  • So if you compare complexities to simplicity,

    コンプレクシティーとシンプリシティーを比較した場合、

  • it's also catching up in a way, too.

    シンプリシティーもある意味同じように追いついてきています。

  • So, somehow humans and simplicity are intertwined, I think.

    どういうわけか、人間とシンプリシティーは互いに関連しあっているように私は思っています。

  • I have a confession: I'm not a man of simplicity.

    ここで告白すると、私はシンプリシティーを体現するような人物ではありません。

  • I spent my entire early career making complex stuff.

    自分のキャリアを歩み始めた頃は、ひたすら複雑な作品を制作していました。

  • Lots of complex stuff.

    沢山複雑なものを作りました。

  • I wrote computer programs to make complex graphics like this.

    プログラムを書いて、このように複雑なグラフィックを作りました。

  • I had clients in Japan to make really complex stuff like this.

    日本のクライアントからこんなに複雑なものの制作を依頼されたりしました。

  • And I've always felt bad about it, in a sense.

    私はいつもこの事に関してある意味、申し訳ない気持ちを持っていました。

  • So, I hid in a time dimension.

    そこで私は時系列に身を隠し、

  • I built things in a time-graphics dimension.

    時空の次元で、物をつくりました。

  • I did this series of calendars for Shiseido.

    私はこのカレンダーのシリーズを資生堂の為に作りました。

  • This is a floral theme calendar in 1997,

    これは1997年に作った花をテーマにしたカレンダーで、

  • and this is a firework calendar. So, you launch the number into space,

    これが花火のカレンダーです。数字を空に打ち上げます。

  • because the Japanese believe that when you see fireworks,

    日本人は花火を見ると、何かしら涼しくなると

  • you're cooler for some reason.

    信じているようです。

  • This is why they have fireworks in the summer.

    この為、日本では夏に花火大会があります。

  • A very extreme culture.

    大変極端な文化です。

  • Lastly, this is a fall-based calendar,

    最後に、これは、秋を表現したカレンダーです。

  • because I have so many leaves in my yard.

    なぜなら、私の庭には沢山の葉っぱがあり、

  • So this is the leaves in my yard, essentially.

    これらは私の庭の葉っぱを表しています。

  • And so I made a lot of these types of things.

    このように、私は沢山このような作品をつくりました。

  • I've been lucky to have been there before people made these kind of things,

    幸運なことに、私は他の人々が同じようなものを作る前に、先んずることができました。

  • and so I made all this kind of stuff that messes with your eyes.

    私は目くらましのような作品をたくさん作ってきました。

  • I feel kind of bad about that.

    この事については少し申し訳ない気持ちがあります。

  • Tomorrow, Paola Antonelli is speaking. I love Paola.

    明日、パオラ アントネリが講演します。私は彼女が大好きです。

  • She has this show right now at MoMA,

    彼女は今MoMAでこのような展示会を開催しており、

  • where some of these early works are here on display at MoMA, on the walls.

    私の初期の頃の作品をMoMaの壁に取り付けられたディスプレー越しで見る事ができます。

  • If you're in New York, please go and see that.

    ニューヨークに住んでいる方は、是非見に行ってください。

  • But I've had a problem, because I make all this flying stuff

    このように動き回る作品を作っていると、一つ問題があって、

  • and people say, "Oh, I know your work.

    人々は私に、「ああ、私はあなたの作品を知っています。

  • You're the guy that makes eye candy."

    あなたはeye candy(見ていて楽しいもの)を作っている人ですね。」と言います。

  • And when you're told this, you feel kind of weird.

    この事を言われると、少々不思議な気分になります。

  • "Eye candy" -- sort of pejorative, don't you think?

    「Eye candy」、少し皮肉に聞こえますよね。そこで代わりに、

  • So, I say, "No, I make eye meat," instead.

    「いいえ、私はeye meat(見ていてインパクトのあるもの)を作っています。」と答えます。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And eye meat is something different, something more fibrous,

    Eye meatは他と異なり、繊維質で、

  • something more powerful, perhaps. But what could that be, eye meat?

    もっと恐らく強力なものです。でも、eye meatとは実際にはどういうものなのでしょう。

  • I've been interested in computer programs all my life, actually.

    私は実際にはコンピュータープログラムにずっと興味を持っていました。

  • Computer programs are essentially trees,

    コンピュータープログラムは基本的に木であり、

  • and when you make art with a computer program, there's kind of a problem.

    コンピュータープログラムでアートを作るときは、ある問題が発生します。

  • Whenever you make art with a computer program,

    コンピュータープログラムを使ってアートを作るとき、

  • you're always on the tree, and the paradox is that

    あなたはいつも木と共にあり、その木から離れないと、

  • for excellent art, you want to be off the tree.

    優れたアートが作れないというパラドックスが存在します。

  • So, this is sort of a complication I've found.

    このような複雑性を私は発見しました。

  • So, to get off the tree, I began to use my old computers.

    そこでその木から離れる為に、私は、自分の古いコンピューターを使い始めました。

  • I took these to Tokyo in 2001 to make computer objects.

    これらをコンピューターのオブジェクトを制作するために、2001年に東京に持ち込みました。

  • This is a new way to type, on my old, color Classic.

    これは、私の古いカラークラシックを使った、新しいタイピングを表したものです。

  • You can't type very much on this.

    これを使ってうまくタイプすることはできません。

  • I also discovered that an IR mouse responds to CRT emissions

    私はまた、赤外線マウスは、ブラウン管の発光に反応し、

  • and starts to move by itself, so this is a self-drawing machine.

    勝手に動き始めることを発見しました。これは自動描画マシンです。

  • And also, one year, the G3 Bondi Blue thing --

    そして、あるとき、あのボンダイブルーの G3から

  • that caddy would come out, like, dangerous, like, "whack," like that.

    キャディーが「バン」という感じで勢い良く外へ出てくるのを見て、

  • But I thought, "This is very interesting. What if I make like a car crash test?"

    「これは面白い。これを車の衝突実験のように作ったらどうなるだろう」と思い、

  • So I have a crash test.

    実際に衝突実験をしてみました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And sort of measure the impact. Stuff like this are things I made,

    いわば衝撃の強さを測定しました。私は、

  • just to sort of understand what these things are.

    実際に使用した素材の本質を理解する為に、これらのものを作りました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Shortly after this, 9/11 happened, and I was very depressed.

    この後しばらくして、9/11が発生し、私はとても落ち込んでいました。

  • I was concerned with contemporary art

    私は怒りを表現したものや、とても深い悲しみに

  • that was all about piss, and sort of really sad things,

    満ちた現代芸術に対する憂慮から、

  • and so I wanted to think about something happy.

    何か幸せなことを考えたいと思うようになりました。

  • So I focused on food as my area --

    そこで、私は食べ物の領域にフォーカスしました。

  • these sort of clementine peel things.

    このようなみかんの皮をとりあげました。

  • In Japan, it's a wonderful thing to remove the clementine peel

    ミカンを一度で剥くと、日本では素晴らしいと言われます。

  • just in one piece. Who's done that before? One-piece clementine?

    誰か、昔実践したことはいますか。ミカンを一度で剥いたことはありますか。

  • Oh, you guys are missing out, if you haven't done it yet.

    まだやったことのない人たちは、損をしています。

  • It was very good, and I discovered I can make sculptures out of this,

    それはとても素晴らしい体験で、これを実際に使って

  • actually, in different forms.

    様々な形で彫刻を作ることができる事を発見しました。

  • If you dry them quick, you can make, like, elephants and steers and stuff,

    手早く乾燥させれば、象や牛などを作る事が出来ますが、

  • and my wife didn't like these, because they mold, so I had to stop that.

    かびてしまうのが妻にとって気に入らなかったので、これは止めにしました。

  • So, I went back to the computer, and I bought five large fries,

    そこで私はコンピューターに戻って、ラージサイズのフレンチフライを5箱購入し、

  • and scanned them all. And I was looking for some kind of food theme,

    全てをスキャンしました。私はある種の食べ物に関する研究テーマを探していたので、

  • and I wrote some software to automatically lay out french-fry images.

    自動的にフレンチフライの画像を自動的に配置するソフトウェアを作成しました。

  • And as a child, I'd hear that song, you know,

    子供の頃に、皆さんもなじみのある、あの曲を聞いていました。

  • "Oh, beautiful, for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain,"

    「ああ、美しきかな、ひろびろとした空、 琥珀色に波打つ穀物の穂」

  • so I made this amber waves image.

    そこで私はこの琥珀色の波のイメージを作成しました。

  • It's sort of a Midwest cornfield out of french fries.

    フレンチフライで作りだされた中西部のトウモロコシ畑のようなものです。

  • And also, as a child, I was the fattest kid in class,

    また子供の頃に、私はクラスの中で最も太っていた子供だったのですが、

  • so I used to love Cheetos. Oh, I love Cheetos, yummy.

    私はチートーズが大好きでした。ああ、大好きなチートーズ、美味しそう。

  • So, I wanted to play with Cheetos in some way.

    そこで私はチートーズを使って何とかして遊んでみたいと思いました。

  • I wasn't sure where to go with this. I invented Cheeto paint.

    どう進めたらよいか、分からなかったのですが、私はチートーペイントを発明しました。

  • Cheeto paint is a very simple way to paint with Cheetos.

    チートーペイントはとても簡単にチートーズを使って絵を描くことができます。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I discovered that Cheetos are good, expressive material.

    チートーズはとても表現力豊かな素材であることを知り、

  • And with these Cheetos, I began to think,

    「これらのチートーズから何が作れるだろうか。」

  • "What can I make with these Cheetos?"

    と考えるようになりました。

  • And so, I began to crinkle up potato chip flecks, and also pretzels.

    そこで私はポテトチップや、プレッツェルズをギザギザに切ったものを用意し、

  • I was looking for some kind of form,

    何かの形になるように試したところ、

  • and in the end, I made 100 butter-fries. Do you get it?

    最終的には、100匹ものバタ「フライ」を作る事ができました。

  • (Laughter)

    おわかりですか。(笑)

  • And each butter-fry is composed of different pieces.

    それぞれのバタ「フライ」は異なる部品で構成されています。

  • People ask me how they make the antenna.

    人々には私がどうやってアンテナ部分を作ったのか聞かれますが、

  • Sometimes, they find a hair in the food. That's my hair.

    たまに食べ物に髪の毛が入っているように、あれは私の髪の毛です。

  • My hair's clean -- it's okay.

    私の髪の毛は清潔なので、大丈夫です。

  • I'm a tenured professor, which means, basically, I don't have to work anymore.

    私は終身教授なので、基本的に私はもう働かなくてもいいのです。

  • It's a strange business model. I can come into work everyday

    とても奇妙なビジネスモデルです。私は毎日出勤して一日中、

  • and staple five pieces of paper and just stare at it with my latte.

    ホッチキスで留めた5枚の紙を、カフェ ラッテ片手に眺めていてもよいのです。

  • End of story.

    以上。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But I realized that life could be very boring,

    でも、そんな人生はとても退屈でしょう。

  • so I've been thinking about life, and I notice that my camera --

    私は人生について考え始めたのですが、ふと、

  • my digital camera versus my car, a very strange thing.

    私のデジタルカメラと車について、とても奇妙な事に気づきました。