Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Erez Lieberman Aiden: Everyone knows

    (エレズ) ご存じと思いますが

  • that a picture is worth a thousand words.

    1枚の絵は千の言葉に値すると言います

  • But we at Harvard

    しかしハーバード大学では

  • were wondering if this was really true.

    この点について疑問を抱きました

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So we assembled a team of experts,

    それで専門家のチームが編成されました

  • spanning Harvard, MIT,

    ハーバード大学 MIT

  • The American Heritage Dictionary, The Encyclopedia Britannica

    アメリカン・ヘリテージ英語辞典 ブリタニカ百科事典

  • and even our proud sponsors,

    それに我らがスポンサー

  • the Google.

    Googleも参加しています

  • And we cogitated about this

    そして4年間に渡って

  • for about four years.

    詳細な研究が続けられ

  • And we came to a startling conclusion.

    驚くべき結論が得られました

  • Ladies and gentlemen, a picture is not worth a thousand words.

    皆さん 1枚の絵は千の言葉に値するのではありません

  • In fact, we found some pictures

    我々の発見によれば

  • that are worth 500 billion words.

    1枚の絵は5千億の言葉に値するのです

  • Jean-Baptiste Michel: So how did we get to this conclusion?

    (ジャン) いかにしてその結論に至ったのか?

  • So Erez and I were thinking about ways

    エレズと私は 人類の文化と歴史が

  • to get a big picture of human culture

    時とともにどう遷移してきたのか

  • and human history: change over time.

    概観できる方法に 考えを巡らせていました

  • So many books actually have been written over the years.

    長年に渡り多くの本が書かれています

  • So we were thinking, well the best way to learn from them

    それらの本をすべて読むのが

  • is to read all of these millions of books.

    最良の方法だろうと考えました

  • Now of course, if there's a scale for how awesome that is,

    もし「いかしてる」度合いを測る単位があったとしたら

  • that has to rank extremely, extremely high.

    これは非常に高い値になるでしょう

  • Now the problem is there's an X-axis for that,

    問題は X軸に

  • which is the practical axis.

    実現性を取ると

  • This is very, very low.

    それがごく低くなるということです

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Now people tend to use an alternative approach,

    それで多くの人は違ったアプローチを取っています

  • which is to take a few sources and read them very carefully.

    一握りの文献を熟読するのです

  • This is extremely practical, but not so awesome.

    現実的ですが そんなにいかしてはいません

  • What you really want to do

    本当にやりたいのは

  • is to get to the awesome yet practical part of this space.

    いかしていながら現実的なことです

  • So it turns out there was a company across the river called Google

    川向こうのGoogleという会社が それを可能にするような

  • who had started a digitization project a few years back

    デジタル化プロジェクトを

  • that might just enable this approach.

    数年前からやっていると聞き及びました

  • They have digitized millions of books.

    何百万という本がデジタル化され

  • So what that means is, one could use computational methods

    それらの本をボタンひとつで

  • to read all of the books in a click of a button.

    コンピュータに読み取らせることができます

  • That's very practical and extremely awesome.

    これはとても現実的でありながら すごくいかしています

  • ELA: Let me tell you a little bit about where books come from.

    (エレズ) 本の由来についてお話ししましょう

  • Since time immemorial, there have been authors.

    大昔から本を書く人々がいて

  • These authors have been striving to write books.

    著者たちは苦労して本を書いていました

  • And this became considerably easier

    数世紀前の印刷術の発明により

  • with the development of the printing press some centuries ago.

    それが格段に容易になりました

  • Since then, the authors have won

    それ以来行われてきた出版の機会というのは

  • on 129 million distinct occasions,

    1億2千9百万回にも

  • publishing books.

    及びます

  • Now if those books are not lost to history,

    それらの本は 失われていなければ

  • then they are somewhere in a library,

    どこかの図書館にあります

  • and many of those books have been getting retrieved from the libraries

    その多くがGoogleにより図書館から借り出され

  • and digitized by Google,

    デジタルデータ化されました

  • which has scanned 15 million books to date.

    既に千5百万冊がスキャンされています

  • Now when Google digitizes a book, they put it into a really nice format.

    Googleはデジタル化された本を有用な形式で保存します

  • Now we've got the data, plus we have metadata.

    データだけでなく メタデータも手に入ります

  • We have information about things like where was it published,

    どこで出版されたのか 誰が書いたのか

  • who was the author, when was it published.

    いつ発行されたのか

  • And what we do is go through all of those records

    私たちがしたのは それらすべてのレコードをチェックして

  • and exclude everything that's not the highest quality data.

    クオリティが最高のもの以外除外するということです

  • What we're left with

    残ったのは

  • is a collection of five million books,

    5百万冊の本

  • 500 billion words,

    5千億語というデータです

  • a string of characters a thousand times longer

    ヒトゲノムよりも

  • than the human genome --

    千倍も長い文字列

  • a text which, when written out,

    書き出したなら

  • would stretch from here to the Moon and back

    地球と月の間を10回以上

  • 10 times over --

    往復する—

  • a veritable shard of our cultural genome.

    紛れもない 我々の文化ゲノムのかけらです

  • Of course what we did

    そのような

  • when faced with such outrageous hyperbole ...

    誇大広告に直面して・・・

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • was what any self-respecting researchers

    私たちがしたのは もちろん

  • would have done.

    自尊心ある研究者なら誰でもするであろうことです

  • We took a page out of XKCD,

    XKCDの漫画の1ページを

  • and we said, "Stand back.

    引用して言ったのです

  • We're going to try science."

    「下がれ 我は科学するものなり」

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • JM: Now of course, we were thinking,

    (ジャン) 私たちが考えたのは

  • well let's just first put the data out there

    まずデータをみんなに公開して

  • for people to do science to it.

    それで科学できるようにしようということです

  • Now we're thinking, what data can we release?

    どんなデータが公開できるでしょう?

  • Well of course, you want to take the books

    もちろん5百万冊の本の

  • and release the full text of these five million books.

    全文を公開したいと思いました

  • Now Google, and Jon Orwant in particular,

    でもGoogleのジョン・オーワントが

  • told us a little equation that we should learn.

    ちょっとした方程式を教えてくれました

  • So you have five million, that is, five million authors

    5百万冊の本 = 5百万人の著者 =

  • and five million plaintiffs is a massive lawsuit.

    5百万の原告からなる巨大な訴訟

  • So, although that would be really, really awesome,

    全文公開は

  • again, that's extremely, extremely impractical.

    ものすごくいかしているにしても 極めて非現実的なのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Now again, we kind of caved in,

    それで再び折れて

  • and we did the very practical approach, which was a bit less awesome.

    いかしている度合いを下げて 現実的なアプローチを取り

  • We said, well instead of releasing the full text,

    全文の代わりに 本の統計データを

  • we're going to release statistics about the books.

    公開することにしたのです

  • So take for instance "A gleam of happiness."

    たとえば “a gleam of happiness”のような

  • It's four words; we call that a four-gram.

    4語からなる“4-gram”が

  • We're going to tell you how many times a particular four-gram

    本の中に何度現れるかわかります

  • appeared in books in 1801, 1802, 1803,

    1801年 1802年 1803年から

  • all the way up to 2008.

    2008年に至るまで

  • That gives us a time series

    時とともに そのフレーズが

  • of how frequently this particular sentence was used over time.

    どれほどの頻度で使われているかわかるのです

  • We do that for all the words and phrases that appear in those books,

    これを本に現れるあらゆる語やフレーズに対して行い

  • and that gives us a big table of two billion lines

    20億行からなる膨大な表が得られました

  • that tell us about the way culture has been changing.

    それは文化がいかに変わってきたか教えてくれます

  • ELA: So those two billion lines,

    (エレズ) 20億行ですから

  • we call them two billion n-grams.

    「20億のn-gram」と呼んでいます

  • What do they tell us?

    それは何を教えてくれるのでしょう?

  • Well the individual n-grams measure cultural trends.

    個々のn-gramは文化のトレンドを示します

  • Let me give you an example.

    例を見てみましょう

  • Let's suppose that I am thriving,

    私が今 “thrive”していて(うまくやっていて)

  • then tomorrow I want to tell you about how well I did.

    明日そのことを話したいと思ったとしましょう

  • And so I might say, "Yesterday, I throve."

    私は “Yesterday, I throve.”と言うかもしれません

  • Alternatively, I could say, "Yesterday, I thrived."

    あるいは “Yesterday, I thrived.”と言うかもしれません

  • Well which one should I use?

    どちらの形を使うべきでしょう?

  • How to know?

    どうすればわかるのか?

  • As of about six months ago,

    半年前であれば

  • the state of the art in this field

    この分野における最先端の方法は

  • is that you would, for instance,

    たとえば

  • go up to the following psychologist with fabulous hair,

    この見事な髪をした心理学者の所に

  • and you'd say,

    聞きに行くことだったでしょう

  • "Steve, you're an expert on the irregular verbs.

    「ピンカーさん あなた不規則動詞の専門家ですよね

  • What should I do?"

    どう言うべきでしょう?」

  • And he'd tell you, "Well most people say thrived,

    彼は「たいていの人はthrivedと言いますが

  • but some people say throve."

    throveと言う人もたまにいます」と答えるでしょう

  • And you also knew, more or less,

    ご存じかもしれませんが

  • that if you were to go back in time 200 years

    200年ほど遡って

  • and ask the following statesman with equally fabulous hair,

    この同じように見事な髪をした政治家の所に行って

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • "Tom, what should I say?"

    「ジェファーソンさん どう言うべきでしょう?」

  • He'd say, "Well, in my day, most people throve,

    と聞いたなら「私の頃には 多くの人はthroveと言い

  • but some thrived."

    たまにthrivedと言う人がいましたね」と言うでしょう

  • So now what I'm just going to show you is raw data.

    では生のデータをご覧に入れましょう

  • Two rows from this table of two billion entries.

    20億行の表の中の2つの行です

  • What you're seeing is year by year frequency

    ご覧いただいているのは

  • of "thrived" and "throve" over time.

    “thrived”と“throve”の年ごとの使用頻度です

  • Now this is just two

    これは20億行の中の

  • out of two billion rows.

    2行に過ぎません

  • So the entire data set

    ですからデータの全体は

  • is a billion times more awesome than this slide.

    このスライドの10億倍いかしていると言えるでしょう

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • JM: Now there are many other pictures that are worth 500 billion words.

    (ジャン) 5千億語に値する絵は

  • For instance, this one.

    他にもあります たとえばこれ

  • If you just take influenza,

    「インフルエンザ」を取り上げてみると

  • you will see peaks at the time where you knew

    大きな流行が起きて

  • big flu epidemics were killing people around the globe.

    世界中でたくさんの人が死んだ年に山があります

  • ELA: If you were not yet convinced,

    (エレズ) もしまだ信じられないなら

  • sea levels are rising,

    「海面」「大気中CO2」

  • so is atmospheric CO2 and global temperature.

    「地球気温」は ご覧のように上昇しています

  • JM: You might also want to have a look at this particular n-gram,

    (ジャン) このn-gramもご覧になりたいかもしれません

  • and that's to tell Nietzsche that God is not dead,

    これはニーチェに神は死んでいないことを教えるものです

  • although you might agree that he might need a better publicist.

    もっとも 神様はもっといい広報担当者を雇うべきかもしれません

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • ELA: You can get at some pretty abstract concepts with this sort of thing.

    (エレズ) 抽象概念について見ることもできます

  • For instance, let me tell you the history

    たとえば「1950年」の

  • of the year 1950.

    歴史を見てみましょう

  • Pretty much for the vast majority of history,

    歴史上の大部分の時代において

  • no one gave a damn about 1950.

    誰も1950年に注意を払ってはいませんでした

  • In 1700, in 1800, in 1900,

    1700年 1800年 1900年

  • no one cared.

    誰も関心を持っていません

  • Through the 30s and 40s,

    1930〜40年代になっても

  • no one cared.

    誰も関心を持っていません

  • Suddenly, in the mid-40s,

    40年代半ばになって

  • there started to be a buzz.

    突然 はやり出します

  • People realized that 1950 was going to happen,

    みんな1950年はやってきて

  • and it could be big.

    それがすごいかもしれないと気づいたのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But nothing got people interested in 1950

    しかし1950年ほど 1950年への関心の

  • like the year 1950.

    高かったときはありません

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • People were walking around obsessed.

    みんな取り付かれたようです

  • They couldn't stop talking

    みんな話しやめることができません

  • about all the things they did in 1950,

    1950年にしたいろんなことや

  • all the things they were planning to do in 1950,

    1950年にしよう思っているいろんなこと

  • all the dreams of what they wanted to accomplish in 1950.

    1950年に達成したいと思っているいろんな夢

  • In fact, 1950 was so fascinating

    実際 1950年はあまりに素晴らしく

  • that for years thereafter,

    その後何年も人々は

  • people just kept talking about all the amazing things that happened,

    その年の素晴らしい出来事について話し続けました

  • in '51, '52, '53.

    51年 52年 53年

  • Finally in 1954,

    1954年になって

  • someone woke up and realized

    ようやく目を覚まし

  • that 1950 had gotten somewhat passé.

    1950年がもう時代遅れなことに気づいたのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And just like that, the bubble burst.

    そうやってバブルははじけました

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And the story of 1950

    同じことが 記録のある

  • is the story of every year that we have on record,

    他のすべての年についても見られます

  • with a little twist, because now we've got these nice charts.

    このような素敵なチャートを描くことができ

  • And because we have these nice charts, we can measure things.

    このチャートから様々なことを測定できます

  • We can say, "Well how fast does the bubble burst?"

    「バブルがはじけるのにどれくらいかかるか?」

  • And it turns out that we can measure that very precisely.

    実際非常に正確に測れることがわかります

  • Equations were derived, graphs were produced,

    方程式を導出し グラフを描いて

  • and the net result

    結果として

  • is that we find that the bubble bursts faster and faster

    バブルがはじけるまでの時間は

  • with each passing year.

    年々短くなっていることがわかります

  • We are losing interest in the past more rapidly.

    私たちは過去への興味を失うのが早くなっているのです

  • JM: Now a little piece of career advice.

    (ジャン) キャリアについてひとつアドバイスしましょう

  • So for those of you who seek to be famous,

    有名になりたいという人は

  • we can learn from the 25 most famous political figures,

    25人の最も有名な政治家 作家

  • authors, actors and so on.

    俳優 といった人々から学べます

  • So if you want to become famous early on, you should be an actor,

    若いときに有名になりたいなら 俳優(紫)になるべきです

  • because then fame starts rising by the end of your 20s --

    20代が終わる前に名声が上がっていきます

  • you're still young, it's really great.

    まだまだ若く 素敵なことです

  • Now if you can wait a little bit, you should be an author,

    もう少し待てるのなら 作家(青)がおすすめです

  • because then you rise to very great heights,

    すごい高みまで行くことができます

  • like Mark Twain, for instance: extremely famous.

    マーク・トウェインなんてすごく有名ですよね

  • But if you want to reach the very top,

    しかし本当の高みにまで行く気なら

  • you should delay gratification

    ご褒美は遅らせて

  • and, of course, become a politician.

    政治家(赤)になるべきでしょう

  • So here you will become famous by the end of your 50s,

    有名になるのは50代の終わりですが

  • and become very, very famous afterward.

    その後はものすごく有名になります

  • So scientists also tend to get famous when they're much older.

    科学者も一般に年を取ってから有名になる傾向があります

  • Like for instance, biologists and physics

    生物学者(緑)や物理学者(灰)は

  • tend to be almost as famous as actors.

    俳優と同じくらい有名になります

  • One mistake you should not do is become a mathematician.

    避けるべき誤りは 数学者(黄)になることです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • If you do that,

    「20代で最高の仕事をしてやるんだ」と

  • you might think, "Oh great. I'm going to do my best work when I'm in my 20s."

    意気込んでいるかもしれませんが

  • But guess what, nobody will really care.

    誰も関心を持ってくれないのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • ELA: There are more sobering notes

    (エレズ) n-gramについては

  • among the n-grams.

    もっと暗い話もあります

  • For instance, here's the trajectory of Marc Chagall,

    これは1887年生まれの画家

  • an artist born in 1887.

    「マルク・シャガール」の曲線です

  • And this looks like the normal trajectory of a famous person.

    有名人に典型的な曲線に見えます

  • He gets more and more and more famous,

    年を追うごとに有名になっていきますが

  • except if you look in German.

    ドイツ語圏は例外です

  • If you look in German, you see something completely bizarre,

    まったく奇妙なことが起きています

  • something you pretty much never see,

    見たことのないようなことです

  • which is he becomes extremely famous

    非常に有名になった後

  • and then all of a sudden plummets,

    突如としてどん底まで下落します

  • going through a nadir between 1933 and 1945,

    1933年から1945年まで落ちていて

  • before rebounding afterward.

    その後復帰します

  • And of course, what we're seeing

    お察しの通り

  • is the fact Marc Chagall was a Jewish artist

    マルク・シャガールは ナチスドイツ下の

  • in Nazi Germany.

    ユダヤ人画家だったということです

  • Now these signals

    このシグナルは

  • are actually so strong

    あまりに強いので

  • that we don't need to know that someone was censored.

    誰か検閲していたのかと訝るまでもないでしょう

  • We can actually figure it out

    実際ごく基本的な信号処理で

  • using really basic signal processing.

    そのことを示せます