Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • In the year 1901,

    1901年に

  • a woman called Auguste was taken to a medical asylum in Frankfurt.

    アウグスタという女性がフランクフルトの 精神病院に連れてこられました

  • Auguste was delusional

    アウグスタには妄想があり

  • and couldn't remember even the most basic details of her life.

    自分の人生の 単純な事ですら思い出せませんでした

  • Her doctor was called Alois.

    彼女の受け持ち医の名前はアロイスでした

  • Alois didn't know how to help Auguste,

    アロイスにはアウグスタを どう助ければいいか分からず

  • but he watched over her until, sadly, she passed away in 1906.

    彼女が亡くなる1906年まで ただ見守るだけでした

  • After she died, Alois performed an autopsy

    アロイスは彼女の死後解剖をし

  • and found strange plaques and tangles in Auguste's brain --

    アウグスタの脳内に 見た事もない

  • the likes of which he'd never seen before.

    奇妙なプラークと神経線維のもつれを発見しました

  • Now here's the even more striking thing.

    ここで驚きなのは

  • If Auguste had instead been alive today,

    もしアウグスタが今生きていたとしても

  • we could offer her no more help than Alois was able to 114 years ago.

    114年前のアロイスと同様 我々には何もできないことです

  • Alois was Dr. Alois Alzheimer.

    アロイスはアロイス・アルツハイマー博士

  • And Auguste Deter

    そしてアウグスタ・ディーターは

  • was the first patient to be diagnosed with what we now call Alzheimer's disease.

    現在アルツハイマー病として知られる病気として 初めて診断された患者です

  • Since 1901, medicine has advanced greatly.

    1901年以降医療はとても進歩しました

  • We've discovered antibiotics and vaccines to protect us from infections,

    私たちを感染から守る 抗生物質やワクチンや

  • many treatments for cancer, antiretrovirals for HIV,

    癌の様々な治療法 HIVに対する抗レトロウィルス薬

  • statins for heart disease and much more.

    心臓病に対するのスタチン系薬剤などが 発見されました

  • But we've made essentially no progress at all in treating Alzheimer's disease.

    しかしアルツハイマー病に対する治療においては ほとんど進歩をしていません

  • I'm part of a team of scientists

    私はアルツハイマー病の治療法を 十年以上探索している

  • who has been working to find a cure for Alzheimer's for over a decade.

    科学者チームの一員です

  • So I think about this all the time.

    私はいつもそれについて考えています

  • Alzheimer's now affects 40 million people worldwide.

    現在世界中で4千万人が アルツハイマー病に冒されています

  • But by 2050, it will affect 150 million people --

    しかし2050年までにはアルツハイマー病は 1億5千万人を冒し

  • which, by the way, will include many of you.

    あなたもその中に含まれるかも知れません

  • If you're hoping to live to be 85 or older,

    もし85歳より長く 生きることを望むのであれば

  • your chance of getting Alzheimer's will be almost one in two.

    アルツハイマー病になる確率は 二人に一人です

  • In other words, odds are you'll spend your golden years

    言い換えると老年期を アルツハイマー病に悩まされるか

  • either suffering from Alzheimer's

    アルツハイマー病に苦しむ 友人や愛する人の

  • or helping to look after a friend or loved one with Alzheimer's.

    介護をしている可能性が高いのです

  • Already in the United States alone,

    アメリカだけでも

  • Alzheimer's care costs 200 billion dollars every year.

    アルツハイマーの治療費は 毎間2000億ドルにのぼり

  • One out of every five Medicare dollars get spent on Alzheimer's.

    Medicareの五分の一が アルツハイマー病に費やされています

  • It is today the most expensive disease,

    現在一番お金のかかる病気であり

  • and costs are projected to increase fivefold by 2050,

    ベビーブーマーの世代が老いるので

  • as the baby boomer generation ages.

    治療費は2050年には 5倍になると予測されています

  • It may surprise you that, put simply,

    驚かれるかもしれませんが

  • Alzheimer's is one of the biggest medical and social challenges of our generation.

    私たちの世代にとってアルツハイマー病は 最大の医学的、社会的チャレンジです

  • But we've done relatively little to address it.

    しかし我々はそれに対して ほとんど何もしていません

  • Today, of the top 10 causes of death worldwide,

    現在世界での死因トップ10の中で

  • Alzheimer's is the only one we cannot prevent, cure or even slow down.

    アルツハイマー病だけが 予防、治療、進行を遅らせることができないものです

  • We understand less about the science of Alzheimer's than other diseases

    アルツハイマー病の研究に対して 時間とお金の投入が少ないので

  • because we've invested less time and money into researching it.

    他の病気よりも アルツハイマー病の仕組みを理解していません

  • The US government spends 10 times more every year

    毎年アルツハイマー病は癌に比べて より医療費がかかり

  • on cancer research than on Alzheimer's

    ほぼ同数の死者がいるのにも拘わらず

  • despite the fact that Alzheimer's costs us more

    合衆国政府は毎年 アルツハイマー病より

  • and causes a similar number of deaths each year as cancer.

    癌に10倍の研究費を費やしています

  • The lack of resources stems from a more fundamental cause:

    資源不足は根本的な原因に由来しています

  • a lack of awareness.

    つまり意識の不足です

  • Because here's what few people know but everyone should:

    なぜならほとんど誰も知らないけれども 皆が知るべきことがあるのです

  • Alzheimer's is a disease, and we can cure it.

    アルツハイマー病は 治療可能な病気なのです

  • For most of the past 114 years,

    114年間にわたり

  • everyone, including scientists, mistakenly confused Alzheimer's with aging.

    科学者を含めて皆が アルツハイマー病を老化と誤って捉えてきました

  • We thought that becoming senile

    私たちがボケる事は

  • was a normal and inevitable part of getting old.

    老化過程の中で正常であり 必然的であると思われていました

  • But we only have to look at a picture

    しかし健康的に老いた脳と

  • of a healthy aged brain compared to the brain of an Alzheimer's patient

    アルツハイマー病患者の脳の写真を見比べれば

  • to see the real physical damage caused by this disease.

    病気によって起こされたダメージがすぐに分かります

  • As well as triggering severe loss of memory and mental abilities,

    記憶と精神的能力の強い障害と共に

  • the damage to the brain caused by Alzheimer's

    アルツハイマー病による脳の障害は

  • significantly reduces life expectancy and is always fatal.

    寿命を著しく短縮し、常に致命的です

  • Remember Dr. Alzheimer found strange plaques and tangles

    一世紀も前に アルツハイマー医師が

  • in Auguste's brain a century ago.

    アウグスタの脳内に奇妙なプラークと 神経線維の絡まりを見付けましたね

  • For almost a century, we didn't know much about these.

    一世紀もの間これが何だか 詳しいことは不明でした

  • Today we know they're made from protein molecules.

    現在ではタンパク質で できていると判明しています

  • You can imagine a protein molecule

    タンパク質の分子は

  • as a piece of paper that normally folds into an elaborate piece of origami.

    精巧な折り紙のように折りたたまれたものです

  • There are spots on the paper that are sticky.

    その紙にはくっつきやすい場所があり

  • And when it folds correctly, these sticky bits end up on the inside.

    正しく折りたたまれると この場所は内側に位置します

  • But sometimes things go wrong, and some sticky bits are on the outside.

    異常が起こると くっつきやすい場所が外側に露出します

  • This causes the protein molecules to stick to each other,

    これがタンパク質同士を凝集させ

  • forming clumps that eventually become large plaques and tangles.

    塊を作り やがて大きなプラークと絡まりになります

  • That's what we see in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

    これがアルツハイマー病患者の脳内に見る物です

  • We've spent the past 10 years at the University of Cambridge

    私たちは過去10年間をケンブリッジ大学で

  • trying to understand how this malfunction works.

    この異常の仕組みを理解しようとしてきました

  • There are many steps, and identifying which step to try to block is complex --

    様々なステップがあり どこで止めるか見定めるのは

  • like defusing a bomb.

    爆弾を解体するくらい複雑なのです

  • Cutting one wire might do nothing.

    一本のワイヤーを切っても 爆発を起こさない可能性もありますが

  • Cutting others might make the bomb explore.

    別のワイヤーを切ると 爆発するかもしれません

  • We have to find the right step to block,

    私たちは止めるために適切なステップを 選んで

  • and then create a drug that does it.

    そこにはたらく薬を作る必要があります

  • Until recently, we for the most part

    最近まで私たちは基本的に

  • have been cutting wires and hoping for the best.

    ワイヤーを切断しては 最善を期待していました

  • But now we've got together a diverse group of people --

    しかし現在私たちは医師、生物学者、遺伝学者 化学者、物理学者、エンジニア、数学者を含む

  • medics, biologists, geneticists, chemists, physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

    多様なグループを結成し

  • And together, we've managed to identify a critical step in the process

    阻止すべき重要なステップを見付ける事ができました

  • and are now testing a new class of drugs which would specifically block this step

    そして今やそのステップを特異的に阻止し 病気を治す

  • and stop the disease.

    新薬を試験しているところです

  • Now let me show you some of our latest results.

    いくつか最新の研究結果をお見せしましょう

  • No one outside of our lab has seen these yet.

    研究室外の人は誰もまだこの結果を見ていません

  • Let's look at some videos of what happened when we tested these new drugs in worms.

    この新薬を線虫に投与した様子を ビデオでお見せします

  • So these are healthy worms,

    さてこれが健康な線虫で

  • and you can see they're moving around normally.

    ご覧の通り正常に動き回っています

  • These worms, on the other hand,

    それに対してれらの線虫は

  • have protein molecules sticking together inside them --

    体内にアルツハイマー病患者のように

  • like humans with Alzheimer's.

    タンパク質が凝集し

  • And you can see they're clearly sick.

    明らかに病気であるとわかります

  • But if we give our new drugs to these worms at an early stage,

    しかし線虫にこの薬を 早い段階で投与すると

  • then we see that they're healthy, and they live a normal lifespan.

    線虫は健康になり普通の寿命まで 生きます

  • This is just an initial positive result, but research like this

    これは初期の肯定的な結果ですが このような研究は

  • shows us that Alzheimer's is a disease that we can understand and we can cure.

    アルツハイマー病を理解して 治療できることを示しています

  • After 114 years of waiting,

    114年も待たされたものの

  • there's finally real hope for what can be achieved

    ようやくこれからの10から20年で

  • in the next 10 or 20 years.

    達成できることには 期待がもてます

  • But to grow that hope, to finally beat Alzheimer's, we need help.

    アルツハイマー病を克服する見込みを さらに高めるためには

  • This isn't about scientists like me --

    助けが必要です

  • it's about you.

    私のような科学者ではなく みなさんの助けです

  • We need you to raise awareness that Alzheimer's is a disease

    アルツハイマー病は病気であり 取り組みを通して治療できるというー

  • and that if we try, we can beat it.

    認識を広めてほしいのです

  • In the case of other diseases,

    他の病気では

  • patients and their families have led the charge for more research

    患者やその家族がさらなる研究を要求して

  • and put pressure on governments, the pharmaceutical industry,

    政府、製薬会社、科学者、関係官庁に

  • scientists and regulators.

    圧力をかけてきました

  • That was essential for advancing treatment for HIV in the late 1980s.

    1980年後半のHIV治療の進歩には これが欠かせませんでした

  • Today, we see that same drive to beat cancer.

    現在癌に関して同じような動きが見られます

  • But Alzheimer's patients are often unable to speak up for themselves.

    しかしアルツハイマー病患者は多くの場合 自分で声をあげることが困難です

  • And their families, the hidden victims, caring for their loved ones night and day,

    また隠れた被害者である患者家族は 日夜 愛する人の介護で疲れ果て

  • are often too worn out to go out and advocate for change.

    状況を変えてくれるよう主張することができません

  • So, it really is down to you.

    みなさん次第なのです

  • Alzheimer's isn't, for the most part, a genetic disease.

    アルツハイマー病はほとんどの場合 遺伝的な病気ではありません

  • Everyone with a brain is at risk.

    脳を持つすべての人が アルツハイマー病のリスクを持っています

  • Today, there are 40 million patients like Auguste,

    今アウグスタのような4千万人の患者が

  • who can't create the change they need for themselves.

    自分たちに必要な変化を起こすことができていないのです

  • Help speak up for them,

    その人たちのために 病気の治療を求める

  • and help demand a cure.

    声をあげてほしいのです

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

In the year 1901,

1901年に

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED アルツハイマー 治療 病気 患者 プラーク

【TED】アルツハイマーは老いではない(Alzheimer’s Is Not Normal Aging — And We Can Cure It | Samuel Cohen | TED Talks)

  • 1188 148
    Max Lin に公開 2016 年 07 月 09 日
動画の中の単語