Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • A tourist is backpacking

    バックパッカーが スコットランド高地を

  • through the highlands of Scotland,

    旅行中に 何か飲もうと

  • and he stops at a pub to get a drink.

    パブに立ち寄ったところ ビール一杯で粘っている 老人と バーテンがいるだけでした

  • And the only people in there is a bartender

    パブに立ち寄ったところ ビール一杯で粘っている 老人と バーテンがいるだけでした

  • and an old man nursing a beer.

    旅行者はビールを1杯注文し

  • And he orders a pint, and they sit in silence for a while.

    みんなしばらく黙って座っていましたが

  • And suddenly the old man turns to him and goes,

    突然老人が 彼に話しかけました

  • "You see this bar?

    「このバーどうだい?ワシが—

  • I built this bar with my bare hands

    国中の良木を使って

  • from the finest wood in the county.

    素手で作った

  • Gave it more love and care than my own child.

    自分の子よりも手をかけ 愛を込めたんだ

  • But do they call me MacGregor the bar builder? No."

    世間のやつらはバーを作った マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ」

  • Points out the window.

    次に 一方の窓を指さして

  • "You see that stone wall out there?

    「あの石壁が見えるか?

  • I built that stone wall with my bare hands.

    ワシが素手で作った 石を持ってきては

  • Found every stone, placed them just so through the rain and the cold.

    雨の日も凍える日も 壁に積んでいった なのに

  • But do they call me MacGregor the stone wall builder? No."

    世間のやつらは石壁を作った マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ」

  • Points out the window.

    また もう一方の窓を指さして

  • "You see that pier on the lake out there?

    「あの湖の桟橋が見えるか?

  • I built that pier with my bare hands.

    ワシが素手で作った 杭を持ってきては

  • Drove the pilings against the tide of the sand, plank by plank.

    砂浜に打ちこんで 板を 1枚1枚はめてった

  • But do they call me MacGregor the pier builder? No.

    世間のやつらは桟橋を作った マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ

  • But you fuck one goat ... "

    それが いっぺんヤギをヤっただけでよ...」

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Storytelling --

    物語を語ること—

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • is joke telling.

    それは冗談を言うのと一緒です

  • It's knowing your punchline,

    オチや 結末を

  • your ending,

    念頭に置きつつ

  • knowing that everything you're saying, from the first sentence to the last,

    最初から最後のひと言まで 伝え方を全て操って

  • is leading to a singular goal,

    1つの結末に導くということです

  • and ideally confirming some truth

    理想としては 人間とは何か

  • that deepens our understandings

    その理解を深めるような

  • of who we are as human beings.

    ちょっとした真実を 確かめられるものです

  • We all love stories.

    みんな物語が大好きです

  • We're born for them.

    本能的に求めます

  • Stories affirm who we are.

    自分が何者なのかを確認するのです

  • We all want affirmations that our lives have meaning.

    人生に意味があることを 確認したいのです

  • And nothing does a greater affirmation

    物語で人と人がつながる時ほど

  • than when we connect through stories.

    これを確かめられるものはありません

  • It can cross the barriers of time,

    過去 現在 未来の

  • past, present and future,

    時間の壁を超えるものです

  • and allow us to experience

    創作であろうと事実であろうと

  • the similarities between ourselves

    人々の類似性を体験し

  • and through others, real and imagined.

    登場人物の立場になって 追体験することを可能にします

  • The children's television host Mr. Rogers

    子供番組のホスト ミスターロジャースは

  • always carried in his wallet

    ソーシャルワーカーの

  • a quote from a social worker

    こんな言葉をいつも 財布に入れていました

  • that said, "Frankly, there isn't anyone you couldn't learn to love

    「はっきり言って その人の物語を聞くと 愛せない人なんて誰もいないのです」

  • once you've heard their story."

    「はっきり言って その人の物語を聞くと 愛せない人なんて誰もいないのです」

  • And the way I like to interpret that

    私はこう解釈したいのです

  • is probably the greatest story commandment,

    素晴らしい物語というものは こんな鉄則を守っているものです

  • which is "Make me care" --

    「関心を持たせよ」

  • please, emotionally,

    感情的な面であれ 知的な面であれ

  • intellectually, aesthetically,

    美しさの面であれ

  • just make me care.

    ただただ関心を引きつけるということ

  • We all know what it's like to not care.

    もちろんなかなか気を惹けません

  • You've gone through hundreds of TV channels,

    何百ものTVのチャンネルを 次から次へ切り替え

  • just switching channel after channel,

    そしてその中で突然

  • and then suddenly you actually stop on one.

    どこかのチャンネルを見始めます

  • It's already halfway over,

    興味を引ければ 半分は 終わったようなものです

  • but something's caught you and you're drawn in and you care.

    何かが心を捉え チャンネルに 引き込まれ 気になって見ます

  • That's not by chance,

    そのチャンネルにしたのは偶然じゃなく

  • that's by design.

    意図的に気を引くように作られてます

  • So it got me thinking, what if I told you my history was story,

    それで私自身の来歴を物語として 語ったらどうかと思いつきました

  • how I was born for it,

    私がいかに創作すべく生まれ

  • how I learned along the way this subject matter?

    どのように物語の創り方を 身に付けて きたかというストーリーです

  • And to make it more interesting,

    今日はもっと楽しんでもらう為に

  • we'll start from the ending

    結末から始めて

  • and we'll go to the beginning.

    始まりへと話を進めることにしましょう

  • And so if I were going to give you the ending of this story,

    そうですね 結末を 教えてしまうとしたら

  • it would go something like this:

    それはこんな感じです

  • And that's what ultimately led me

    「そんなわけで

  • to speaking to you here at TED

    こうして TED で 皆さんに

  • about story.

    物語について語るまでになったのです」

  • And the most current story lesson that I've had

    物語の教訓で 最新のものは

  • was completing the film I've just done

    今年 2012年に完成したばかりの

  • this year in 2012.

    映画を作る過程にありました

  • The film is "John Carter." It's based on a book called "The Princess of Mars,"

    映画「ジョン・カーター」は 「火星のプリンセス」が原作です

  • which was written by Edgar Rice Burroughs.

    エドガー・ライス・バローズの著作です

  • And Edgar Rice Burroughs actually put himself

    バローズは映画の中で 物語の語り部として

  • as a character inside this movie, and as the narrator.

    登場しています

  • And he's summoned by his rich uncle, John Carter, to his mansion

    彼は大金持ちのおじ ジョン・カーターからの 「すぐきてくれ」という電報で豪邸に呼び寄せられます

  • with a telegram saying, "See me at once."

    彼は大金持ちのおじ ジョン・カーターからの 「すぐきてくれ」という電報で豪邸に呼び寄せられます

  • But once he gets there,

    訪ねて行ってみると

  • he's found out that his uncle has mysteriously passed away

    おじが 既に謎に満ちた死をとげていて

  • and been entombed in a mausoleum on the property.

    敷地内の霊廟に葬られたことを知ります

  • (Video) Butler: You won't find a keyhole.

    (ビデオ) 執事: 鍵穴はございません

  • Thing only opens from the inside.

    中からしか開けられない ようになっております

  • He insisted,

    旦那様は 死化粧も

  • no embalming, no open coffin,

    弔問も 葬列も

  • no funeral.

    絶対するなとおっしゃいました

  • You don't acquire the kind of wealth your uncle commanded

    まぁ 普通の人のようにしていたら おじさまのような 富を我がモノにすることはできないのでしょうね

  • by being like the rest of us, huh?

    まぁ 普通の人のようにしていたら おじさまのような 富を我がモノにすることはできないのでしょうね

  • Come, let's go inside.

    さぁ 家に入りましょう

  • AS: What this scene is doing, and it did in the book,

    スタントン: この場面は本でも同じですが

  • is it's fundamentally making a promise.

    何かが起こりそうと期待させます

  • It's making a promise to you

    この場面は 物語が見るに値する—

  • that this story will lead somewhere that's worth your time.

    ものとなっていくのを期待させます

  • And that's what all good stories should do at the beginning, is they should give you a promise.

    よくできた物語は全て 最初に期待を 持たせるようにしないとだめです

  • You could do it an infinite amount of ways.

    期待を持たす方法は無数にあります

  • Sometimes it's as simple as "Once upon a time ... "

    「昔むかし あるところに」のような 単純な出だしもあります

  • These Carter books always had Edgar Rice Burroughs as a narrator in it.

    カーターシリーズには バローズが 常に語り部として登場します

  • And I always thought it was such a fantastic device.

    このしかけは凄いと思っていました

  • It's like a guy inviting you around the campfire,

    まるで たき火を囲んでの 談話に誘っているかのよう

  • or somebody in a bar saying, "Here, let me tell you a story.

    あるいは バーで「面白い話があるんだ いや オレじゃなくて 他のやつに起こった事だけど

  • It didn't happen to me, it happened to somebody else,

    あるいは バーで「面白い話があるんだ いや オレじゃなくて 他のやつに起こった事だけど

  • but it's going to be worth your time."

    聞く価値はあるぞ」と 話しかけてくる人のようです

  • A well told promise

    うまく引き起こされた期待というのは

  • is like a pebble being pulled back in a slingshot

    引き絞ったパチンコから放たれた石のように 話の結末までグングンと

  • and propels you forward through the story

    引き絞ったパチンコから放たれた石のように 話の結末までグングンと

  • to the end.

    引っ張っていくのです

  • In 2008,

    さて 2008年には

  • I pushed all the theories that I had on story at the time

    それまでに学んでいた 物語に関する全ての理論を

  • to the limits of my understanding on this project.

    極限まで押し進めて この作品を作りました

  • (Video) (Mechanical Sounds)

    (ビデオ) (機械音)

  • And that is all

    ♫ 愛とは ♫

  • that love's about

    ♫ そういうもの ♫

  • And we'll recall

    ♫ 最後の時に ♫

  • when time runs out

    ♫ 思い起こすでしょう ♫

  • That it only

    ♫ 一生の愛は・・・ ♫

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • AS: Storytelling without dialogue.

    スタントン: 会話によらない伝え方

  • It's the purest form of cinematic storytelling.

    もっとも純粋に映画的な伝え方で

  • It's the most inclusive approach you can take.

    これ以上に全体的な アプローチはありません

  • It confirmed something I really had a hunch on,

    これを通して 観客は主題を

  • is that the audience

    自分で見つけたがっているという

  • actually wants to work for their meal.

    直感が確信になりました

  • They just don't want to know that they're doing that.

    意識せず そうしたがっているのです

  • That's your job as a storyteller,

    物語を作る側の仕事は

  • is to hide the fact

    観客に主題を見つけさせていることを

  • that you're making them work for their meal.

    うまく隠すということです

  • We're born problem solvers.

    人は問題を解こうとします

  • We're compelled to deduce

    人は推論や推理をしたがります

  • and to deduct,

    これは人が現実世界でも

  • because that's what we do in real life.

    そうしているからです

  • It's this well-organized absence of information

    緻密に計算された情報の欠落が

  • that draws us in.

    人を引き込みます

  • There's a reason that we're all attracted to an infant or a puppy.

    人が幼児や子犬に惹かれるのには 理由があります

  • It's not just that they're damn cute;

    すごくかわいいだけじゃなく

  • it's because they can't completely express

    幼児や子犬は 考えていること したいことを全て

  • what they're thinking and what their intentions are.

    表現できるわけではないからです

  • And it's like a magnet.

    まるで磁石のようです

  • We can't stop ourselves

    人は 途中までになっている文を

  • from wanting to complete the sentence and fill it in.

    完成せずにはいられません

  • I first started

    このしかけが分かり始めたのは

  • really understanding this storytelling device

    ボブ・ピーターソンと 「ファインディング・ニモ」の

  • when I was writing with Bob Peterson on "Finding Nemo."

    脚本を書いていたときです

  • And we would call this the unifying theory of two plus two.

    この結びつけざるを得ないしかけを 「2 + 2 の法則」と呼びました

  • Make the audience put things together.

    観客に手掛かりから推理させます

  • Don't give them four,

    答えの4を見せず

  • give them two plus two.

    2 + 2 を見せるのです

  • The elements you provide and the order you place them in

    どんな手掛かりを どういう順序で見せるかが

  • is crucial to whether you succeed or fail at engaging the audience.

    観客を引き込めるかの 成否を握っています

  • Editors and screenwriters have known this all along.

    編集者や脚本家には このことが ずっと分かっていました

  • It's the invisible application

    気付かない内に観客を物語に

  • that holds our attention to story.

    惹きつける方法なのです

  • I don't mean to make it sound

    これは正に科学で立証されてると

  • like this is an actual exact science, it's not.

    言うつもりはありません そういったものではありません

  • That's what's so special about stories,

    これは物語の素晴らしいところです

  • they're not a widget, they aren't exact.

    機械のようなきっちりした ものではないのです

  • Stories are inevitable, if they're good,

    いい物語は必然性を持ちながら

  • but they're not predictable.

    先を読むことができません

  • I took a seminar in this year

    今年 演技指導者であるジュディス・ ウェストンのセミナーを受けて

  • with an acting teacher named Judith Weston.

    今年 演技指導者であるジュディス・ ウェストンのセミナーを受けて

  • And I learned a key insight to character.

    人物像に関する重要な洞察を学びました

  • She believed that all well-drawn characters

    彼女によれば よく描かれた キャラクターには全て

  • have a spine.

    一本背骨が通っているのです

  • And the idea is that the character has an inner motor,

    キャラクターを内面から突き動かす

  • a dominant, unconscious goal that they're striving for,

    無意識ながら支配的な 願望があるのです

  • an itch that they can't scratch.

    掻き切れない 痒みのようなものです

  • She gave a wonderful example of Michael Corleone,

    「ゴットファーザー」でアル・パチーノが演じた マイケル・コルレオーネが良い例として挙げられていました

  • Al Pacino's character in "The Godfather,"

    「ゴットファーザー」でアル・パチーノが演じた マイケル・コルレオーネが良い例として挙げられていました

  • and that probably his spine

    この役の背骨は恐らく

  • was to please his father.

    父親を喜ばせるところにあります

  • And it's something that always drove all his choices.

    それが常に彼の行動を決めています

  • Even after his father died,

    父親が亡くなってからでさえも

  • he was still trying to scratch that itch.

    その痒みを掻き続けているのです

  • I took to this like a duck to water.

    私はこの背骨の話には 最初から納得できました

  • Wall-E's was to find the beauty.

    ウォーリーの場合は 美を追い求め

  • Marlin's, the father in "Finding Nemo,"

    「ファインディング・ニモ」の 父親マーリンは

  • was to prevent harm.

    子を守ろうとし

  • And Woody's was to do what was best for his child.

    ウッディは 持ち主である子供 の為に全力を尽くします

  • And these spines don't always drive you to make the best choices.

    この背骨によって 必ずしも最善の 選択ができるわけではありません

  • Sometimes you can make some horrible choices with them.

    ときには 背骨がとんでもない 決断をさせることもあります

  • I'm really blessed to be a parent,

    私は祝福され親になりました

  • and watching my children grow, I really firmly believe

    子供たちが成長するのを見ていると 人はなんらかの 気質や才能を持って生まれてくると 思えてなりません

  • that you're born with a temperament and you're wired a certain way,

    子供たちが成長するのを見ていると 人はなんらかの 気質や才能を持って生まれてくると 思えてなりません

  • and you don't have any say about it,

    持って生まれてくるものは 選ぶこともできないし

  • and there's no changing it.

    変えることもできません

  • All you can do is learn to recognize it

    できるのは 気質や才能を認識することと

  • and own it.

    自分の本分として活かしていくことだけです

  • And some of us are born with temperaments that are positive,

    良い気質を持って生まれもすれば

  • some are negative.

    悪い気質を持って生まれることもあります

  • But a major threshold is passed

    悪い面も 突き動かす背骨を受け入れて

  • when you mature enough

    自ら制御できるように成長すれば

  • to acknowledge what drives you

    大きな分岐点を

  • and to take the wheel and steer it.

    超えることができます

  • As parents, you're always learning who your children are.

    親としては常に 自分の子が どんな子かを学び

  • They're learning who they are.

    子供たちも日々 自分について知っていき

  • And you're still learning who you are.

    大人自身もまた 自分について 学び続けています

  • So we're all learning all the time.

    全ての人が常に探り続けているのです

  • And that's why change is fundamental in story.

    そのため変化は物語の 基礎的な要素となります

  • If things go static, stories die,

    変化がないと物語は 死んでしまいます

  • because life is never static.

    変化のない人生なんてないからです

  • In 1998,

    1998年に「トイストーリー」と 「バグズ・ライフ」の

  • I had finished writing "Toy Story" and "A Bug's Life"

    脚本を書き終えて 映画の—

  • and I was completely hooked on screenwriting.

    脚本作りに病みつきになりました

  • So I wanted to become much better at it and learn anything I could.

    もっと上手く書きたくなって その為にどんなことでも学びました

  • So I researched everything I possibly could.

    調べられるすべてのことを調べました

  • And I finally came across this fantastic quote

    そしてついに イギリスの劇作家

  • by a British playwright, William Archer:

    ウィリアム・アーチャーの 素晴らしい名言に出会いました

  • "Drama is anticipation

    「劇とは不確実なものに

  • mingled with uncertainty."

    取り巻かれた期待だ」という言葉です

  • It's an incredibly insightful definition.

    信じられないほど 示唆に富んだ定義です

  • When you're telling a story,

    物語を伝えるときに

  • have you constructed anticipation?

    期待感をうまく構築しているか?

  • In the short-term, have you made me want to know

    瞬間瞬間に 次に何が起こるのか

  • what will happen next?

    知りたいと思わせているか?

  • But more importantly,

    さらに重要なのは 全体として

  • have you made me want to know

    最終的にどんな風に終わるのかを

  • how it will all conclude in the long-term?

    知りたいと思わせているか?

  • Have you constructed honest conflicts

    結果が思った通りにならないかも

  • with truth that creates doubt

    と思わせるような事実を入れて

  • in what the outcome might be?

    正当な緊張感を組み込んだか?

  • An example would be in "Finding Nemo,"

    「ファインディング・ニモ」を例に出すなら

  • in the short tension, you were always worried,

    瞬間瞬間には マーリンに言われたことを

  • would Dory's short-term memory

    ドーリーがすぐに忘れてしまうことに

  • make her forget whatever she was being told by Marlin.

    常にやきもきさせられます

  • But under that was this global tension

    同時に 物語中ずっと 果たして—

  • of will we ever find Nemo

    大海原の中で ニモを見つけられるのかが

  • in this huge, vast ocean?

    気になっています

  • In our earliest days at Pixar,

    ピクサー創業当時は

  • before we truly understood the invisible workings of story,

    物語に隠されたしかけを 掴んでいなかったので

  • we were simply a group of guys just going on our gut, going on our instincts.

    本能や感じるままに何でも 試している ただの集団でした

  • And it's interesting to see

    こうした挑戦が

  • how that led us places

    結構いい線までたどりつくまでの

  • that were actually pretty good.

    道のりを辿るのは面白いです

  • You've got to remember that in this time of year,

    1993年当時のことを 思い起こしてください

  • 1993,

    成功したアニメ映画といえば

  • what was considered a successful animated picture

    「リトルマーメイド」や 「美女と野獣」だったり

  • was "The Little Mermaid," "Beauty and the Beast,"

    「アラジン」や「ライオンキング」 と考えられていた