Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • This mouse loves sugar. He loves sugar so much that even after he's eaten and should

    このネズミは砂糖が大好き。大好きすぎて、食べ終わってお腹いっぱいの時でさえ、

  • be pretty full, he crosses a metal platform that gives his feet electric shocks just to

    甘いご褒美をもらうためだけに電気ショックが足に流れる金属台を渡る。

  • get a sweet reward.

  • Sometimes our love of sugar makes us go a little overboard.

    ときに、私たちの砂糖への愛は行き過ぎることがある。

  • We've all been in that situation where we've had one cookie and then suddenlythe whole pack is gone.

    誰もが1つだけクッキーを食べたはずが、突然、1袋全部なくなっているという状況に出くわしたことがあるだろう。

  • And then, we crave more. So can you be addicted to sugar?

    それからもっと欲しい思う。砂糖中毒になることはあるのだろうか?

  • Let's revisit our mouse friendthat brave little guy who risked his life just

    友人のネズミをもう一度見てみよう。その勇気ある小さな奴は水に溶けた砂糖を

  • for some sugar dissolved in water.

    得るためだけに命を侵す。

  • When he did this, a pathway was lighting up from the hunger and feeding region of his

    そうしたとき、脳の中の飢餓や餌やりの部分から

  • brain to another region important for motivation and reward.

    モチベーションや報酬の部分が光る。

  • He'd developed a reward seeking habit.

    報酬を求める習慣を発達させたのだ。

  • Looking at this pathway is like zooming in on our larger reward-processing centre.

    この道はもっと大きな報酬プロセスの中心で増大する。

  • Researchers found that activating it increases compulsive overeating and binge eating behavior.

    研究者は、それを活性化させることが強制過食を増やし、摂食障害を引き起こすことを発見した。

  • And they found that shutting down the pathway decreased that sugar seeking behavior.

    そしてその道を閉じると糖分を探す行動が減ることが分かった。

  • But it didn’t stop normal healthy eating behavior, like having dinner.

    しかし通常の健康的な食事行動、夕食をとるなどを止めることはなかった。

  • For us, a reward seeking behavior is going to the fridge or pantry and getting a cookie.

    私たちにとって、報酬を求める行動は冷蔵庫や食糧庫に行って、クッキーを得ることだ。

  • We're hardwired to love sugar because it has energy-dense calories.

    私たちが糖分を求めるのは、エネルギー密度が高いからだ。

  • And it keeps activating our brain’s reward system,

    そして脳の報酬体系を活性化し続ける。

  • and these behaviors aren’t new to research.

    これらの行動は新しい研究ではない。

  • In an established animal model, rats are food deprived for 12 hours and then they're given 12 hour access to sugar water and food.

    設立された動物モデルで、野ネズミは12時間食べ物を与えられず、その後12時間ずっと砂糖水、食事を与えらえる。、水、

  • As a result, they drink a lot of the sugar water, especially when it becomes first available.

    結果として、多くの砂糖水を飲むことになる。特に最初に飲めるようになったとき。

  • After a month on this feeding schedule, the rats display behaviors similar to those seen

    この餌やり計画1か月ごには、野ネズミが薬物依存に見られるような行動を示すようになる。

  • in drug abuse. They binge on the sugar, and show withdrawals, cravings and even depression

    砂糖に依存し、離脱症状や切望、落ち込みまで示すようになる。

  • when it's not there. After this sugar bingeing the rats show a similar pattern of brain activity

    この糖分依存の後、この野ネズミはモルフィン依存の他の野ネズミのような脳の

  • as other rats who are morphine-dependent.

    活動パターンを示す。

  • Many studies have compared sugar addiction to drug addiction, because they show similar

    多くの研究で糖分中毒と薬物中毒が比較されているのは、似たような症状を示すからだ。

  • symptoms. Like increased tolerance, withdrawals and unsuccessful attempts to quit.

    耐性が増え、離脱症状や止めようとする行為が失敗に終わることのようだ。

  • Could sugar really be as bad for us as drugs?

    砂糖は本当に薬物のように私たちに悪いのだろうか?

  • Some experts think so, arguing that sugar is toxic, messing with our hormones and harming our organs.

    砂糖は毒で、ホルモンに影響し、組織に害を与えるという専門家もいる。

  • Thesugar is toxicargument is mainly related to fructoseit's one sugar primarily

    「砂糖毒」という議論は主に、果糖と関連している。テーブルシュガーや

  • found in table sugar or high fructose corn syrup. Fructose can only be processed by our

    高い果糖のコーンシロップに見られる。果糖は肝臓でのみ処理されるので

  • liver, so consuming too much puts a lot of stress on it. It’s been suggested that over

    摂取しすぎはストレスを与えることになる。時とともに、

  • time this can lead to metabolic syndrome, which in turn can lead to type 2 diabetes.

    メタボリック・シンドロームにつながり、いずれ2型糖尿病になる。

  • Not everyone agrees with these claims that sugar is evil. Some of the studies that link

    砂糖は悪だという主張に全員が賛成しているわけではない。ある研究では、

  • fructose to health problems have been criticisedbecause in them animal or human participants

    果糖と健康問題のつながりが批評されている。なぜなら動物や人間の実験台が

  • consumed way more fructose than most people would. And animals metabolise fructose differently

    たいていの人が摂取するよりもずっと多い果糖を消費するからだ。そして動物のメタボリック果糖は

  • to humans. Studies show that mice and rats convert as much as 50% of fructose into fat,

    人間のものと異なる。ネズミや野ネズミは果糖の50%を脂肪に変える一方で、

  • while for humans it's more like one percent. What a fat rat.

    人間は1%しかないという研究がある。なんて太ったネズミだ。

  • And it's important to remember that many things, apart from sugar and drugs, can stimulate our brain's reward circuit.

    砂糖や薬物以外にも多くのものが脳の報酬巡回を刺激しうる。

  • Like exercise, gambling and to a lesser extent, fatty foods.

    エクササイズのように、ギャンブルはある意味、高脂肪食だ。

  • It doesn't necessarily mean were addicted to those things, we just find them pleasurable.

    これらのものに中毒があるというわけでは必ずしもないが、ただ楽しいと感じる。

  • It's pretty clear that sugar is an addictive food. But even if you like eating chocolate

    砂糖が中毒性のある食べ物だというのはかなり明らかだ。チョコレートやドーナツを毎日食べるのが好きとは言え、

  • or donuts every day it doesn't mean youre addicted. Very few people are.

    中毒であるとは限らない。中毒の人は少ない。

  • Still, if you are finding it impossible to reduce sugar cravings, doing regular exercise,

    それでも糖分を欲することを止められないなら定期的なエクササイズをすること、

  • eating dairy products and even chewing gum have been shown to help.

    乳製品を食べること。チューイングガムを噛むことは助けになるらしい。

  • Whatever you do, just don't cross a metal platform that gives your feet electric shocks

    何をするにしても、糖分の報酬を得るために足に電気ショックが流れる金属台は渡らないように。

  • to get a sweet reward. It’s not gonna end well.

    結果は良くないだろうから。

  • If you haven't already, check out my last episode on what sugar does to our bodies.

    まだなら、砂糖が体にどんな影響を与えるのか最新のエピソードをチェックして。

  • And subscribe to BrainCraft! It's pretty sweet.

    そしてBrainCraftをチャンネル登録してね。結構甘いよ。

This mouse loves sugar. He loves sugar so much that even after he's eaten and should

このネズミは砂糖が大好き。大好きすぎて、食べ終わってお腹いっぱいの時でさえ、

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

B1 中級 日本語 砂糖 果糖 中毒 糖分 報酬 薬物

砂糖中毒になることはあるのか?(Can You be Addicted to Sugar?)

  • 29583 1156
    Adam Huang   に公開 2018 年 12 月 27 日
重要英単語

前のバージョンに戻す