Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hello, and welcome to Crash Course Astronomy! I’m your host, Phil Plait, and I’ll be

    こんにちは、そしてクラッシュコース天文学へようこそ!ホストのフィル・プレイトです。

  • taking you on a guided tour of the entire Universe. You might want to pack a lunch.

    宇宙全体を案内してくれますお弁当を持っていくといいかもしれません

  • Over the course of this series well explore planets, stars, black holes, galaxies, subatomic

    このシリーズでは、惑星、星、ブラックホール、銀河、素粒子を探求していきます。

  • particles, and even the eventual fate of the Universe itself.

    粒子、さらには宇宙そのものの最終的な運命までも。

  • But before we step into space, let’s take a step back. I wanna talk to you about science.

    しかし、宇宙に行く前に、一歩下がってみましょう。科学の話をしたい

  • There are lots of definitions of science, but I’ll say that it’s a body of knowledge,

    科学の定義はいろいろありますが、知識の体であると言っておきます。

  • and a method of how we learned that knowledge.

    と、その知識をどうやって学んだのかという方法。

  • Science tells us that stuff we know may not be perfectly known; it may be partly or entirely

    科学は、私たちが知っていることは、完全には知られていないかもしれないし、部分的にも完全にも知られていないかもしれないことを教えてくれます。

  • wrong. We need to watch the Universe, see how it behaves, make guesses about why it’s

    間違っている宇宙を見て、宇宙がどう振る舞うかを見て、なぜ宇宙が悪いのかを推測する必要があります。

  • doing what it’s doing, and then try to think of ways to support or disprove those ideas.

    その上で、その考えを支持する方法や反証する方法を考えてみてください。

  • That last part is important. Science must be, above all else, honest if we really want

    最後の部分が重要です科学は、何よりも正直でなければなりません。

  • to get to the bottom of things.

    物事の真相に迫るために

  • Understanding that our understanding might be wrong is essential, and trying to figure

    私たちの理解が間違っているかもしれないことを理解することが不可欠であり、それを理解しようとすることは

  • out the ways we may be mistaken is the only way that science can help us find our way

    勘違いしているかもしれない方法を見つけ出すことは、科学が自分の道を見つけるのに役立つ唯一の方法です。

  • to the truth, or at least the nearest approximation to it.

    真実に、あるいはそれに最も近いものに

  • Science learns. We meander a bit as we use it, but in the long run we get closer and closer

    科学は学びます。使っていくうちに少し蛇行するが、長い目で見ればどんどん近づいていく

  • to understanding reality, and that is the strength of science. And it’s all around us!

    現実を理解することが 科学の強みですそしてそれは私たちの身の回りにあるのです!

  • Whether you know it or not, youre soaking in science.

    知っているか知らないかは別にして、科学に浸っている。

  • Youre a primate.(anthropology) You have mass.(physics) Mitochondria

    霊長類だから(人類学)質量があるから(物理学)ミトコンドリア

  • in your cells are generating energy.(biology) Presumably, youre breathing oxygen.(chemistry)

    細胞の中でエネルギーを発生させているのです(生物学) おそらく酸素を吸っているのでしょう(化学)

  • But astronomy is different. It’s still science, of course, but astronomy puts you in your place.

    でも天文学は違うもちろん科学ではあるが 天文学は自分の居場所を作ってくれる

  • Because of astronomy, I know were standing on a sphere of mostly molten rock and metal

    天文学のおかげで、私たちはほとんど溶けた岩と金属の球体の上に立っていることを知っています。

  • 13,000 kilometers across, with a fuzzy atmosphere about 100 km high, surrounded by a magnetic

    1万3千キロ、高さ約100キロのファジーな大気に囲まれた磁気圏

  • field that protects us from the onslaught of subatomic particles from the Sun 150 million

    太陽からの素粒子の猛攻から私たちを守るフィールド 1億5000万個

  • km away, which is also flooding space with light that reaches across space, to illuminate

    km離れているが、それもまた、空間を横切る光で空間を照らしている。

  • the planets, asteroids, dust, and comets, racing out past the Kuiper Belt, through the

    惑星、小惑星、塵、彗星、カイパーベルトを越えて

  • Oort Cloud, into interstellar space, past the nearest stars, which orbit along with

    オルト雲と一緒に周回している最も近い星を通り越して、星間空間に入っていきます。

  • gas clouds and dust lanes in a gigantic spiral galaxy we call the Milky Way that has a supermassive

    天の川銀河と呼ばれる巨大な渦巻き銀河のガス雲とダストレーンの中には、超巨大なガス雲とダストレーンがあります。

  • black hole in its center, and is surrounded by 150 globular clusters and a halo of dark

    ブラックホールを中心に、150個の球状星団と暗黒のハローに囲まれています。

  • matter and dwarf galaxies, some of which it’s eating, all of which can be seen by other

    物質や矮小銀河を食べているものもありますが、それらはすべて他の人が見ることができます。

  • galaxies in our Local Group like Andromeda and Triangulum, and our group is on the outskirts

    アンドロメダやトライアングルムのようなローカルグループの銀河があり、私たちのグループは郊外にあります。

  • of the Virgo galaxy cluster, which is part of the Virgo supercluster, which is just one

    おとめ座銀河団の一部であるおとめ座スーパークラスターに属しています。

  • of many other gigantic structures that stretch most of the way across the visible Universe,

    目に見える宇宙の大部分を横切っている他の多くの巨大な構造物の

  • which is 90-billion light years across and expanding every day, even faster today than

    900億光年を超え、日々拡大している、今日よりもさらに速いスピードで

  • yesterday due to mysterious dark energy, and even all that might be part of an infinitely

    昨日は謎の暗黒エネルギーのために、それさえも無限の一部であるかもしれません。

  • larger multiverse that extends forever both in time and space.

    時間的にも空間的にも永遠に広がる大多元宇宙。

  • See? Astronomy puts you in your place.

    見たか?天文学はあなたの居場所を教えてくれる

  • But what exactly is astronomy? This isn’t necessarily an obvious thing to ask. When

    しかし、天文学とは一体何なのでしょうか?これは必ずしも当たり前のことではありませんいつのまにか

  • I was a kid, it was easy: Astronomy is the study of things in the sky. The sun, moon,

    私は子供の頃、それは簡単でした:天文学は空にあるものの研究です。太陽や月

  • stars, galaxies, and stuff like that. But it’s not so easy to pigeonhole these days.

    星とか銀河とか、そんな感じです。でも最近はなかなかピジョンホールができないんですよね。

  • Take, for example, Mars. When I haul myscope out to the end of my driveway and look at

    例えば火星。スコープを車道の端まで持って行き

  • Mars, that’s astronomy, right? Of course! But what about the rovers there? Those machines

    火星、それは天文学だよね?もちろん!でもローバーは?あの機械は?

  • aren’t doing astronomy, surely. Theyre doing chemistry, geology, hydrology, petrology

    天文学はやっていない化学、地質学、水文学、岩石学をやっている...

  • everything but astronomy!

    天文以外の何でもあり

  • So nowadays, what’s astronomy? I’d say it’s still studying stuff in the sky, but

    今の時代、天文学ってなんだろう?今でも空にあるものを研究することですが

  • it’s branched out quite a bit from there. Borders between it and other fields of science

    そこからかなり分岐していますそれと他の科学分野との境界線

  • are fuzzy… a theme I’ll be hitting on several times over this series. Humans might

    このシリーズで何度か取り上げているテーマですが人間は

  • like firm, delineated boundaries between things, but nature isn’t so picky.

    境界線がしっかりしているのが好きだが、自然はそうはいかない。

  • And that brings us to our first edition ofFocus On…”

    第一回目の「フォーカス・オン...」をお届けします。

  • This week’s topic: Astronomers! Who are we? What do we do?

    今週のお題。天文学者!?我々は何者なのか?私たちは何をしているの?

  • I used to look through telescopes for a living, or at least study the data that came from

    私は生計のために望遠鏡を覗いていましたし、少なくともデータを研究していました。

  • detectors strapped onto them. But now I talk and write (and make videos) about astronomy,

    検出器をつけていましたでも今は天文学について話したり書いたり(ビデオを作ったり)しています。

  • and relegate my viewing to my personal backyard telescope. But I still consider myself an

    望遠鏡を使っての鑑賞は、私の個人的な裏庭の望遠鏡に頼ることにしました。しかし、私は今でも自分のことを

  • astronomer, so that should give you an idea that there’s a lot of wiggle room in the profession.

    天文学者ということで、この職業には多くの揺らぎの余地があるということがお分かりいただけたのではないでしょうか。

  • In fact, when I worked on Hubble Space Telescope, I was actually hired as... a programmer!

    実際、ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡で働いていた時は、プログラマーとして雇われていました。

  • I coded in the language used by the folks helping to build and calibrate a camera that

    私は、カメラを作って校正するのを手伝っている人たちが使っている言語でコード化しました。

  • was due to launch into space and be installed onto Hubble by an astronaut.

    は、宇宙に打ち上げられ、宇宙飛行士によってハッブルに取り付けられる予定でした。

  • Once the data from that camera are taken and analyzed, you have to know what to do with

    カメラのデータを撮影して分析したら、そのデータをどうするかを知る必要があります。

  • them. Do the observations fit the physical model of how stars blow up, or how galaxies

    のような観測をしています。観測結果は、星がどのようにして吹き上がるのか、銀河がどのようにして吹き上がるのか、という物理モデルと一致しているのでしょうか?

  • form, or the way gas flows through space? Well, you'd better know your math and physics,

    ガスの流れ方は?まあ、数学と物理学の知識を身につけておいた方がいい。

  • because that’s how we test our hypotheses. And someone who does that is generally called

    それが私たちの仮説を検証する方法だからですそのようなことをする人は一般的に

  • an astrophysicist.

    天体物理学者。

  • Of course, those telescopes and detectors don’t create themselves. We need engineers

    もちろん、それらの望遠鏡や検出器は、自分で作り出すものではありません。技術者が必要です

  • to design and build them and technicians to use them.

    を設計・施工し、それを使用する技術者がいます。

  • Most astronomers don’t actually use the telescopes themselves anymore; someone who’s

    ほとんどの天文学者は自分で望遠鏡を使っているわけではありません。

  • trained in their specific use does that for them.

    固有の使用方法で訓練を受けた人は、彼らのためにそれを行います。

  • Some of those instruments go into space, and some go to other worlds, like the moon and Mars.

    その中には宇宙に行くものもあれば、月や火星のような他の世界に行くものもあります。

  • We need astronomers and engineers and software programmers who can build those, too.

    天文学者やエンジニア、ソフトウェアプログラマーも必要です。

  • And then, at the end of all this, we need people to tell you all about it. Teachers,

    そして、最後には、すべてを伝えてくれる人が必要です。先生方。

  • professors, writers, video makers, even artists.

    教授、作家、映像作家、アーティストまで。

  • So I’ll tell you what: If you have an interest in the Universe, if you love to look up at

    宇宙に興味を持っている人、見上げるのが好きな人は

  • the stars, if you crave to understand what’s going on literally over your head, then who

    星は、あなたが文字通りあなたの頭の上に起こっていることを理解するために切望する場合は、その後、誰が

  • am I to say youre not an astronomer?

    天文学者ではないと言えばいいのか?

  • However you define astronomy, humans have been looking up at the sky for as long as

    天文学の定義がどうであれ、人類は、天文学と同じくらい昔から空を見上げてきました。

  • weve been humans. Certainly ancient people noticed the big glowy

    私たちは人間になってから確かに古代の人々は、大きな光を放つ

  • ball in the sky, and how it lit everything up while it was up, and how it got dark when

    空に玉があって、それが起きている間、それがどのようにすべてを照らすのか、そしてそれがどのように暗くなったのか

  • it was gone. The other, fainter glowy thing tried, but wasn’t quite as good as lighting

    なくなっていました。もう一つの、もっと淡い光のものは、試してみましたが、照明ほどではありませんでした。

  • up the night. They probably took that sort of thing pretty seriously. They probably also

    夜になると彼らはおそらくその種のことを かなり真剣に考えていました彼らはまた、おそらく

  • noticed that when certain stars appeared in the sky, the weather started getting warmer

    ほしあがり

  • and the days longer, and when other stars were seen, the weather would get colder and

    と日が長くなり、他の星が見られると寒くなり

  • daytime shorten.

    デイタイムショート。

  • And when humans settled down, discovered agriculture, and started farming, noticing those patterns

    そして、人間が定住し、農業を発見し、農業を始めたとき、それらのパターンに気がついた。

  • in the sky would have had an even greater impact. It told them when to plant seeds,

    空の中ではさらに大きな影響を与えていたでしょうそれは種を植える時期を教えてくれたのです

  • and when to harvest.

    と収穫のタイミング。

  • The cycles in the sky became pretty important. So important that it wasn’t hard to imagine

    空のサイクルはかなり重要になった想像するのは難しいことではありませんでした

  • gods up there, looking down on us weak and ridiculous humans, interfering with our lives.

    神々はそこにいて、弱くて馬鹿げた人間を見下ろして、私たちの生活を妨害している。

  • Surely if the stars tell us when to plant, and control the weather, seasons, and the

    確かに、星が植える時期を教えてくれたり、天気や季節をコントロールしてくれれば

  • length of the day, they control our lives tooand astrology was born.

    一日の長さ、彼らは私たちの生活も支配しています...そして、占星術が生まれました。

  • Astrology literally meansstudy of the stars”; as a word it’s been used before

    占星術は文字通り「星の研究」を意味します。

  • science became a formal method of studying nature. It irks me a bit, since it got the

    科学が自然を研究するための 正式な方法になったのですを得たので、ちょっとイライラします。

  • good name, and now were stuck withastronomy,” which meanslaw or culture of the stars."

    いい名前なのに、今は "天文学 "にとらわれている。"星の法則や文化 "を意味する "天文学 "だ。

  • That’s not really what we do! But what the heck. Words change meaning over time, and

    それは私たちの仕事ではありません!でも、なんだかんだで。言葉は時間の経過とともに意味を変えていきますし

  • now it’s pretty well understood that astronomy is science, and astrologyisn’t.

    天文学は科学であって占星術は...そうではないということが よく分かってきた

  • Millennia ago, astrology was as close to science as you got. It had some of the flavors of

    何千年も前に 占星術は科学に近いものでしたそれはいくつかの味を持っていた

  • science: astrologers observed the skies, made predictions about how it would affect people,

    科学:占星術師は空を観察し、それが人々にどのように影響を与えるかについての予測を行った。

  • and then those people would provide evidence for it by swearing up and down it worked.

    そして、それらの人々は、それがうまくいったと断言することによって、その証拠を提供するでしょう。

  • The thing is, it really didn’t; the fault of astrology lies in ourselves and not our

    占星術の欠点は自分自身にあるのであって、自分自身ではありません。

  • stars. People tend to remember the hits and forget the misses when predictions are made,

    の星。人は予想が当たるとミスを覚えてしまい、ミスを忘れてしまう傾向があります。

  • which is why they sometimes sit in casinos pumping nickels into machines that are

    だからこそ、カジノの機械にニッケルを流し込むことがある

  • proven to be nothing more than a method for reducing the number of nickels you have.

    ニッケルの数を減らすための方法以外の何物でもないことが証明されています。

  • But astrology led to people to really study the sky, and find the patterns there, which

    しかし、占星術によって人々は本当に空を研究し、そこにあるパターンを見つけるようになりました。

  • led to a more rigorous understanding of how things worked in the heavenly vault.

    天空の金庫の中で物事がどのように機能するかをより厳密に理解するようになりました。

  • It wasn’t overnight, of course. This took centuries. Before the invention of the telescope,

    もちろん一夜にしてできたことではありません。何世紀もかかったのです望遠鏡が発明される前に

  • keen observers built all sorts of odd and wonderful devices to measure the heavens,

    鋭い観察者たちは、天を測るために、あらゆる種類の奇妙で素晴らしい装置を作った。

  • and in fact it was before the telescope was first turned to the sky that a huge revolution

    望遠鏡が最初に空に向けられる前に大革命が起きたのです。

  • in astronomy took place.

    天文学の世界での出来事が起こりました。

  • It is patently obvious that the ground you stand on is fixed, rooted if you will, and

    あなたが立っている地面が固定されていることは明らかです。

  • the skies turn above us. The sun rises, the sun sets. The moon rises and sets, the stars

    空は我々の頭上を回る太陽が昇り、太陽が沈む月が昇り、星が沈む

  • themselves wheel around the sky at night. Clearly, the Earth is motionless, and the

    夜の空の周りを自転しています明らかに、地球は動かないし

  • sky is what is actually moving. In fact, if you think about it, geocentrism

    空は実際に動いているものです実際に考えてみると、ジオセントリズムは

  • makes perfect sense that all the objects in the sky revolve about the Earth, and are fixed

    天は地の周りを回って固定されていることを意味する

  • to a series of nested spheres, some of which are transparent, maybe made of crystal, which

    入れ子になった球体のシリーズになります そのうちのいくつかは透明です たぶん水晶でできています

  • spin once per day. The stars may just be holes in the otherwise opaque sphere, letting sunlight through.

    一日に一度は回っています。星は不透明な球体の中に穴が開いていて太陽光を通しているだけかもしれません。

  • Sounds silly to you, doesn’t it?

    馬鹿げた話に聞こえるだろ?

  • Well, here’s the thing: If you don’t have today’s modern understanding of how the

    まあ、ここからが本題なんですが、現代の現代的な理解がなければ

  • cosmos works, this whole multiple-shells-of-things-in- the-sky thing actually does make sense. It explains

    コスモスが機能しているということは、この空にある複数の殻の中のものが実際には意味を成しているということです。説明がつきます

  • a lot of what’s going on over your head, and if it was good enough for Plato, Aristotle,

    頭の上にあるものがたくさんあってプラトンでよかったのかアリストテレス

  • and Ptolemy, then by god it was good enough for you. And speaking of which, it was endorsed

    そしてプトレマイオス人は、神に誓って、それはあなたにとって十分なものでした。そして、そういえば、それはお墨付きだった

  • by the major religions of the time, so maybe it’s better if you just nod and agree and

    当時の主要な宗教によると、うなずきながら同意して

  • don’t think about it too hard.

    難しいことは考えないでください。

  • But a few centuries ago things changed. Although he wasn’t the first, the Polish mathematician

    しかし、数世紀前には状況が変わっていました。彼が最初ではありませんでしたが ポーランドの数学者

  • and astronomer Copernicus came up with the idea that the sun was the center of the solar

    と天文学者のコペルニクスが考え出したのが、太陽を中心とした

  • system, not the Earth. His ideas had problems, which well get to in a later episode, but

    システムではなく、地球である。彼のアイデアには問題がありました それは後のエピソードで説明しますが

  • it did an incrementally better job than geocentrism.

    それは地球中心主義よりも少しずつ良い仕事をしていました。

  • And then along came Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler, who modified that system, making it

    そして、ティコ・ブラエとヨハネス・ケプラーがやってきて、そのシステムを修正し、それを作りました。

  • even better. Then Isaac Newton - oh, Newton - he invented calculus partly to help him

    さらに良いことにアイザック・ニュートンは微積分を発明しました

  • understand the way objects moved in space. Over time, our math got better, our physics

    物体がどのように空間を移動するかを 理解することができます時間が経つにつれて 数学は上達し 物理学は

  • got better, and our understanding grew. Applied math was a revolution in astronomy, and then

    より良いものになり 理解が深まりました応用数学は天文学の革命となり

  • the use of telescopes was another. Galileo didn’t invent the telescope, by

    望遠鏡の使用は別のものでしたガリレオは望遠鏡を発明したのではなく

  • the way, but made them better; Newton invented a new kind that was even better than that,

    ニュートンはそれよりもさらに優れた新しい種類を発明しました。

  • and weve run with the idea from there.

    と、そこから考えて走ってきました。

  • Then, about a century or so ago, came another revolution: photography. We could capture

    それから約1世紀ほど前に、写真という別の革命が起こりました。私たちは写真を撮ることができました。

  • much fainter objects on glass plates sprayed with light-sensitive chemicals, which revealed

    感光性の薬品を吹き付けたガラス板の上に、より暗い物体が現れました。

  • stars otherwise invisible to us, details in galaxies, beautiful clouds of gas and dust in space.

    私たちには見えない星、銀河の細部、宇宙空間のガスや塵の美しい雲。

  • And then in the latter half of the last century, digital detectors were invented, which were

    そして、前世紀後半には、デジタル検出器が発明されました。

  • even more sensitive than film. We could use computers to directly analyze observations,

    フィルムよりもさらに感度が高いコンピュータを使って観察結果を直接分析することができます

  • and our knowledge leaped again. When these were coupled with telescopes sent in orbit

    私たちの知識は再び飛躍しましたこれらが軌道上に送られた望遠鏡と組み合わされると

  • around the Earth - where our roiling and boiling atmosphere doesn’t blur out observations

    沸騰した大気が観測をぼやかしていない地球周辺

  • - we began yet another revolution.

    - 我々はまだ別の革命を始めた

  • And where are we now?

    で、今はどこにいるんだ?

  • Weve come such a long way! What questions can we routinely ask that our ancestors would

    私たちはこんなに長い道のりを歩んできたのです私たちの祖先が日常的に尋ねることができる質問は何でしょうか?

  • not have dared, what statements made with a pretty good degree of certainty?

    あえてしていない、どのようなステートメントは、かなり良い程度の確実性で作られていますか?

  • Think on this: The lights in the sky are stars! There are other worlds. We take the idea of

    これについて考えてみてください。空の光は星だ!他の世界がある私たちは

  • looking for life on alien planets seriously, and spend billions of dollars doing it. Our

    真剣にエイリアンの惑星に生命体を探し、それをやって数十億ドルを費やしています。私たちの

  • galaxy is one of a hundred billion others. We can only directly see 4% of the Universe.

    銀河は他の1000億個の銀河の一つである。私たちが直接見ることができるのは宇宙の4%にすぎません。

  • Stars explode, and when they do they create the stuff of life: the iron in our blood,

    星は爆発して 生命の源となるものを作り出す 血中の鉄分だ

  • the calcium in our bones, the phosphorus that is the backbone of our DNA. The most common

    私たちの骨にはカルシウムがあります DNAのバックボーンとなるリンがあります最も一般的な

  • kind of star in the Universe is so faint you can’t see it without a telescope. Our solar

    宇宙の中の星の種類は、望遠鏡がないと見えないほど暗いです。私たちの太陽

  • system is filled to overflowing with worlds more bizarre than we could have dreamed.

    システムは、私たちが夢見ていた以上に奇妙な世界で溢れています。

  • Nature has more imagination than we do. It comes up with some nutty stuff. Were clever

    自然は人間よりも想像力が豊かだ変なことを思いつくのです私たちは賢い

  • too, we big-brained apes. Weve learned a lotbut there’s still a long way to go.

    私たち大脳の類人猿も我々は多くのことを学んだが...まだ長い道のりがある。

  • So, with that, I think were ready. Let’s explore the universe.

    これで準備はできたと思います宇宙を探検してみましょう。

  • Today you learned what astronomy is, and that astronomers aren’t just people who operate

    今日は天文学とは何か、天文学者はただの操作をするだけの人ではないことを学びました。

  • telescopes, but include mathematicians, engineers, technicians, programmers, and even artists.

    望遠鏡だけでなく、数学者、エンジニア、技術者、プログラマー、芸術家までもが含まれています。

  • We also wrapped up with a quick history of the origins and development of astronomy,

    また、天文学の起源と発展の歴史を簡単に説明して締めくくりました。

  • from ancient observers to the Hubble Space Telescope.

    古代の観測者からハッブル宇宙望遠鏡まで。

  • Crash Course is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios.

    クラッシュコースはPBSデジタルスタジオとの提携で制作されています。

  • This episode was written by me, Phil Plait. The script was edited by Blake de Pastino,

    このエピソードは私、フィル・プレイトが執筆しました。脚本はブレイク・デ・パスティーノが編集しました。

  • and our consultant is Dr. Michelle Thaller. It was co-directed by Nicholas Jenkins and

    私たちのコンサルタントは ミシェル・タラー博士ですニコラス・ジェンキンスと

  • Michael Aranda, and the graphics team is Thought Café.

    マイケル・アランダ、グラフィックチームはThought Café。

Hello, and welcome to Crash Course Astronomy! I’m your host, Phil Plait, and I’ll be

こんにちは、そしてクラッシュコース天文学へようこそ!ホストのフィル・プレイトです。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B2 中上級 日本語 CrashCourse 天文 望遠 宇宙 銀河 占星

天文入門。クラッシュコース天文学#1

  • 735 71
    Serena に公開
動画の中の単語