Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Chris Anderson: The rights of citizens,

    (クリス・アンダーソン) 市民の権利 —

  • the future of the Internet.

    インターネットの未来

  • So I would like to welcome to the TED stage

    このTEDのステージに

  • the man behind those revelations,

    一連の暴露報道の背後にいる人物を 迎えましょう

  • Ed Snowden.

    エドワード・スノーデンです

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Ed is in a remote location somewhere in Russia

    彼はここから遠く離れた ロシアのとある場所にいて

  • controlling this bot from his laptop,

    ノートPCで このロボットを 操作しています

  • so he can see what the bot can see.

    彼はこのロボットの目を通して 見ています

  • Ed, welcome to the TED stage.

    エドワード TEDへようこそ

  • What can you see, as a matter of fact?

    実際のところ そちらからは何が見えていますか?

  • Edward Snowden: Ha, I can see everyone.

    (エドワード・スノーデン) みんなが見えますよ

  • This is amazing.

    すごいもんだ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • CA: Ed, some questions for you.

    (クリス) いくつか聞きたいことがあります

  • You've been called many things

    あなたは この何ヶ月か —

  • in the last few months.

    いろんな呼び方を されてきました

  • You've been called a whistleblower, a traitor,

    内部告発者 裏切り者

  • a hero.

    ヒーロー

  • What words would you describe yourself with?

    ご自身では 自分を どう言い表しますか?

  • ES: You know, everybody who is involved

    (エドワード) この議論に 加わる人はみんな

  • with this debate

    私自身のことや

  • has been struggling over me and my personality

    私の人格 私をどう位置づけるかといったことで

  • and how to describe me.

    頭を悩ませているみたいですが

  • But when I think about it,

    そんなことで

  • this isn't the question that we should be struggling with.

    悩むべきでは ありません

  • Who I am really doesn't matter at all.

    私が何者かは 問題ではないのです

  • If I'm the worst person in the world,

    私が世界で最悪の人間 だというなら

  • you can hate me and move on.

    単に嫌ってもらえばいい

  • What really matters here are the issues.

    本当に重要なのは 私が提起した問題の方です

  • What really matters here is the kind of government we want,

    今 本当に重要なのは 私達がどんな政府 —

  • the kind of Internet we want,

    どんなインターネット —

  • the kind of relationship between people

    どんな形の 人と社会の関係を

  • and societies.

    求めるのかということです

  • And that's what I'm hoping the debate will move towards,

    それが私の望んでいる 議論の方向で

  • and we've seen that increasing over time.

    時とともに そういう議論が 増えてきています

  • If I had to describe myself,

    自分を説明するとしたら

  • I wouldn't use words like "hero."

    私は「ヒーロー」とか

  • I wouldn't use "patriot," and I wouldn't use "traitor."

    「愛国者」とか「裏切り者」 といった言葉は使いません

  • I'd say I'm an American and I'm a citizen,

    私はみんなと同じ 1人のアメリカ人であり

  • just like everyone else.

    市民です

  • CA: So just to give some context

    (クリス) 話の全容を

  • for those who don't know the whole story --

    ご存じない方のために 説明しますが —

  • (Applause) —

    (拍手)

  • this time a year ago, you were stationed in Hawaii

    1年前の今頃 あなたはハワイで

  • working as a consultant to the NSA.

    NSAの仕事をしていました

  • As a sysadmin, you had access

    システム管理者として

  • to their systems,

    システムにアクセスできたあなたは

  • and you began revealing certain classified documents

    選りすぐった ジャーナリスト何人かに

  • to some handpicked journalists

    ある種の極秘文書を 提供し始め それが —

  • leading the way to June's revelations.

    6月の暴露報道へと つながりました

  • Now, what propelled you to do this?

    そうしようと思った 動機は何だったんですか?

  • ES: You know,

    (エドワード) そうですね

  • when I was sitting in Hawaii,

    ハワイで働いていた時や

  • and the years before, when I was working in the intelligence community,

    それ以前に何年か 情報機関で働いていた時に

  • I saw a lot of things that had disturbed me.

    心乱されるようなものを いろいろ目にしました

  • We do a lot of good things in the intelligence community,

    情報機関では 必要なこと —

  • things that need to be done,

    みんなのためになるような

  • and things that help everyone.

    良い事もたくさんしています

  • But there are also things that go too far.

    しかし行き過ぎた ところもあって

  • There are things that shouldn't be done,

    すべきでないことが行われ

  • and decisions that were being made in secret

    重要な決定が秘密裏に なされています

  • without the public's awareness,

    人々の知らないところで

  • without the public's consent,

    社会の同意を得ることもなく 行われ

  • and without even our representatives in government

    我々の代表である 議員ですら

  • having knowledge of these programs.

    そういったプログラムについて 知らされていないのです

  • When I really came to struggle with these issues,

    私がこの問題に 深く悩むようになって

  • I thought to myself,

    考えたのは

  • how can I do this in the most responsible way,

    リスクを最小限に留めながら 公益を最大にできる

  • that maximizes the public benefit

    最も責任ある行動を取るには

  • while minimizing the risks?

    どうすればよいか ということでした

  • And out of all the solutions that I could come up with,

    いろいろな方法を 考えました

  • out of going to Congress,

    議会で公表しようかとも 考えましたが

  • when there were no laws,

    私のような一個人

  • there were no legal protections

    情報機関で働く

  • for a private employee,

    契約スタッフに対する

  • a contractor in intelligence like myself,

    法的な保護というのは 存在せず

  • there was a risk that I would be buried along with the information

    情報と一緒に葬り去られ 誰にも知られずに終わるという

  • and the public would never find out.

    懸念がありました

  • But the First Amendment of the United States Constitution

    しかし我々には 報道の自由を保障する

  • guarantees us a free press for a reason,

    憲法修正第1条があります

  • and that's to enable an adversarial press,

    これは政府への批判報道や 異議を唱えることを

  • to challenge the government,

    可能にするためですが

  • but also to work together with the government,

    同時に 政府と手を携え

  • to have a dialogue and debate about how we can

    国の安全を脅かすことなく

  • inform the public about matters of vital importance

    重要な問題を 公に知らせる方法について

  • without putting our national security at risk.

    対話や議論をすることも 可能にしています

  • And by working with journalists,

    だからジャーナリストと協力して

  • by giving all of my information

    すべての情報を

  • back to the American people,

    アメリカ国民に 返してしまう方が

  • rather than trusting myself to make

    どう公開するか 自分で決めるよりも

  • the decisions about publication,

    良いと判断したのです

  • we've had a robust debate

    政府で時間を費やして

  • with a deep investment by the government

    しっかりした議論を してきたことが

  • that I think has resulted in a benefit for everyone.

    すべての人の 役に立っていると思います

  • And the risks that have been threatened,

    また恐れられていたリスク —

  • the risks that have been played up

    政府が誇張してきたリスクが

  • by the government

    現実のものになることも

  • have never materialized.

    ありませんでした

  • We've never seen any evidence

    具体的な害が 生じたという証拠は

  • of even a single instance of specific harm,

    1つもありません

  • and because of that,

    ですから私は

  • I'm comfortable with the decisions that I made.

    自分のした決断に 満足しています

  • CA: So let me show the audience

    (クリス) ではあなたが 暴露した情報を

  • a couple of examples of what you revealed.

    いくつか皆さんに お見せしたいと思います

  • If we could have a slide up, and Ed,

    スライドを出してもらえますか?

  • I don't know whether you can see,

    そちらから見えるか 分かりませんが

  • the slides are here.

    スライドが出ています

  • This is a slide of the PRISM program,

    PRISMプログラムの スライドです

  • and maybe you could tell the audience

    ここから何が 明らかになったのか

  • what that was that was revealed.

    あなたから説明して いただけますか?

  • ES: The best way to understand PRISM,

    (エドワード) いろいろ混乱が あるようなので

  • because there's been a little bit of controversy,

    PRISMを 理解してもらうため

  • is to first talk about what PRISM isn't.

    まず PRISMが何でないかを 語るのが良いと思います

  • Much of the debate in the U.S. has been about metadata.

    アメリカでしきりに議論されたのは メタデータについてでした

  • They've said it's just metadata, it's just metadata,

    あれはメタデータに過ぎないという 説明が繰り返され

  • and they're talking about a specific legal authority

    愛国者法215条が

  • called Section 215 of the Patriot Act.

    法的根拠とされました

  • That allows sort of a warrantless wiretapping,

    この法律で可能になるのは 令状なしの通信傍受や

  • mass surveillance of the entire country's

    全国規模での通話記録の監視 といったことです

  • phone records, things like that --

    誰が誰と通話したか

  • who you're talking to,

    いつ通話したかといった

  • when you're talking to them,

    通話記録や

  • where you traveled.

    誰がどこへ行ったか

  • These are all metadata events.

    そういったものが メタデータです

  • PRISM is about content.

    しかしPRISMは 内容に関するものです

  • It's a program through which the government could

    このプログラムを通じて

  • compel corporate America,

    政府はアメリカ企業に対し

  • it could deputize corporate America

    NSAに代わって 汚い仕事をするよう

  • to do its dirty work for the NSA.

    無理強いすることができます

  • And even though some of these companies did resist,

    企業の中には

  • even though some of them --

    Yahoo のように

  • I believe Yahoo was one of them

    抵抗したところもありますが

  • challenged them in court, they all lost,

    裁判では ことごとく負けています

  • because it was never tried by an open court.

    公開裁判では なかったからです

  • They were only tried by a secret court.

    審理はすべて 秘密法廷でなされました

  • And something that we've seen,

    PRISMについて私が

  • something about the PRISM program that's very concerning to me is,

    とても懸念を 感じるところですが

  • there's been a talking point in the U.S. government

    政府によると

  • where they've said 15 federal judges

    15人の連邦判事が それらのプログラムを審査して

  • have reviewed these programs and found them to be lawful,

    合法だと判断したそうです

  • but what they don't tell you

    しかしここで彼らが 語っていないのは

  • is those are secret judges

    それが非公開法廷において

  • in a secret court

    非公開の判事によって

  • based on secret interpretations of law

    非公開の法律解釈に基づいて 行われているということです

  • that's considered 34,000 warrant requests

    過去33年間に3万4千件の 令状申請がありましたが

  • over 33 years,

    却下された政府による申請は

  • and in 33 years only rejected

    33年間で

  • 11 government requests.

    たった11件しかないんです

  • These aren't the people that we want deciding

    自由でオープンな インターネットにおける

  • what the role of corporate America

    アメリカ企業の役割について

  • in a free and open Internet should be.

    そんな人たちに決めて欲しいとは 思わないでしょう

  • CA: Now, this slide that we're showing here

    (クリス) 今出ているスライドには

  • shows the dates in which

    どのインターネット企業が

  • different technology companies, Internet companies,

    いつこのプログラムに参加し

  • are alleged to have joined the program,

    データ収集が始まったのかという

  • and where data collection began from them.

    日付が書かれています

  • Now, they have denied collaborating with the NSA.

    企業側はみんなNSAとの 協力を否定していますが

  • How was that data collected by the NSA?

    NSAはどのようにして データを集めていたのでしょう?

  • ES: Right. So the NSA's own slides

    (エドワード) NSAのスライドには

  • refer to it as direct access.

    「直接アクセス」と書かれています

  • What that means to an actual NSA analyst,

    私のようなNSAの分析官 —

  • someone like me who was working as an intelligence analyst

    ハワイから 中国のハッカーなどを標的に

  • targeting, Chinese cyber-hackers,

    情報分析する人間にとって

  • things like that, in Hawaii,

    「直接アクセス」が意味しているのは

  • is the provenance of that data

    データを相手のサーバーから

  • is directly from their servers.

    直接取るということです

  • It doesn't mean

    これは別に

  • that there's a group of company representatives

    企業の代表者が 煙草の煙が立ち込めた部屋で

  • sitting in a smoky room with the NSA

    NSAとよろしくやって

  • palling around and making back-room deals

    データをどう引き渡すか

  • about how they're going to give this stuff away.

    密談しているという ことではありません

  • Now each company handles it different ways.

    それぞれの企業は 異なる対応をしていて

  • Some are responsible.

    責任の重い企業もあれば

  • Some are somewhat less responsible.

    幾分軽い企業もありますが

  • But the bottom line is, when we talk about

    肝心なのは

  • how this information is given,

    情報がどんな経路で 渡ったかということで言うと

  • it's coming from the companies themselves.

    いずれも企業から直接 来ているということです

  • It's not stolen from the lines.

    ネットワークから 傍受されたのではありません

  • But there's an important thing to remember here:

    ただ 念頭におくべきなのは —

  • even though companies pushed back,

    企業が抵抗を試み

  • even though companies demanded,

    政府に対して要求し

  • hey, let's do this through a warrant process,

    ちゃんと裁判所を通そう —

  • let's do this

    なんらかの法的な チェックがなされ

  • where we actually have some sort of legal review,

    しかるべき根拠に基づいて ユーザーデータの引き渡しが

  • some sort of basis for handing over

    行われるようにしよう

  • these users' data,

    と言っても無駄だということです

  • we saw stories in the Washington Post last year

    去年のワシントンポスト紙の 報道にあるように —

  • that weren't as well reported as the PRISM story

    これは PRISMの件ほど 大きく取り上げられていませんが

  • that said the NSA broke in

    NSAは なんと —

  • to the data center communications

    GoogleやYahooの

  • between Google to itself

    データセンター間の通信に

  • and Yahoo to itself.

    入り込んでいたんです

  • So even these companies that are cooperating

    企業がたとえ

  • in at least a compelled but hopefully lawful manner

    強制され 法に従う形で

  • with the NSA,

    NSAに協力したところで

  • the NSA isn't satisfied with that,

    NSAがそれで満足することは ありません

  • and because of that, we need our companies

    ですから企業は

  • to work very hard

    ユーザーの利益を代表し

  • to guarantee that they're going to represent

    ユーザーの権利を代弁すべく

  • the interests of the user, and also advocate

    できる限りの努力を

  • for the rights of the users.

    する必要があると思います

  • And I think over the last year,

    この1年で

  • we've seen the companies that are named

    PRISMのスライドに 出ていた企業が

  • on the PRISM slides

    その点で大きく

  • take great strides to do that,

    前進しました

  • and I encourage them to continue.

    その努力を続けてほしい と思います

  • CA: What more should they do?

    (クリス) 企業が他にすべきことは 何でしょう?

  • ES: The biggest thing that an Internet company

    (エドワード) アメリカの インターネット企業が今

  • in America can do today, right now,

    世界のユーザーの権利を守るために

  • without consulting with lawyers,

    弁護士への相談なしにできる

  • to protect the rights of users worldwide,

    最も効果的なことは

  • is to enable SSL web encryption

    SSLを有効にして すべてのウェブアクセスを

  • on every page you visit.

    暗号化することです

  • The reason this matters is today,

    これがなぜ重要かというと

  • if you go to look at a copy of "1984" on Amazon.com,

    あなたがAmazonのウェブサイトで 『1984年』を検索したとすると

  • the NSA can see a record of that,

    その記録はNSAだけでなく

  • the Russian intelligence service can see a record of that,

    ロシアの諜報機関であれ

  • the Chinese service can see a record of that,

    中国の機関であれ フランスの機関であれ

  • the French service, the German service,

    ドイツの機関であれ アンドラの機関であれ

  • the services of Andorra.

    見ることが可能だからです

  • They can all see it because it's unencrypted.

    暗号化されていないので みんな見ることができます

  • The world's library is Amazon.com,

    Amazonは世界の図書館ですが

  • but not only do they not support encryption by default,

    ページは通常 暗号化されてないだけでなく

  • you cannot choose to use encryption

    本を探す時に 暗号化するという選択肢が

  • when browsing through books.

    そもそも存在しないのです

  • This is something that we need to change,

    これはAmazonに限らず 変えるべきことです

  • not just for Amazon, I don't mean to single them out,

    Amazonの名を挙げたのは

  • but they're a great example.

    格好の例だからに過ぎません

  • All companies need to move

    すべての企業は

  • to an encrypted browsing habit by default

    ユーザーが ウェブを見る時に

  • for all users who haven't taken any action

    何も選択しなかった場合の 既定の動作として

  • or picked any special methods on their own.

    暗号化を有効にすべきです

  • That'll increase the privacy and the rights

    そうすれば世界中の人々の プライバシーと権利が

  • that people enjoy worldwide.

    より強く守られるようになります

  • CA: Ed, come with me to this part of the stage.

    (クリス) エドワード こちらに来てもらえますか

  • I want to show you the next slide here. (Applause)

    次のスライドを見てみましょう (拍手)

  • This is a program called Boundless Informant.

    これは「バウンドレス・インフォーマント」 というプログラムですが

  • What is that?

    説明してもらえますか?

  • ES: So, I've got to give credit to the NSA

    (エドワード) これに関しては NSAは —

  • for using appropriate names on this.

    うまく名前を付けたものだと思います

  • This is one of my favorite NSA cryptonyms.

    「際限なき情報提供者」 という意味です

  • Boundless Informant

    バウンドレス・インフォーマントは

  • is a program that the NSA hid from Congress.

    NSAが議会に 隠していたプログラムです

  • The NSA was previously asked by Congress,

    NSAは以前 議会の聴聞会で 質問を受けました