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  • Welcome to 10 minutes of international current events.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, reporting from Atlanta, Georgia, for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • First up this Wednesday, Russian drones over Syria.

  • We`ve told you before how Russia has been building up

  • military equipment and troops in Syria.

  • It seems to be supporting the Syrian government

  • in the Middle Eastern country's civil war.

  • That concerns the US because it opposes Syria's government

  • and wants its president removed.

  • Russia has started to fly drones, unmanned aircraft there.

  • US officials say it looks like they're doing surveillance.

  • They haven't said whether the drones are armed.

  • Here's where this gets more complicated though.

  • The US is leading airstrikes against the ISIS terrorist group in Syria.

  • American officials are now concerned about possible run- ins

  • between American and Russian aircraft in the skies over Syria.

  • Next up, Pope Francis, the leader of the Roman Catholic church,

  • arrived on US soil yesterday.

  • It's the pontiff's first trip to America.

  • And when his plane arrived,

  • President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and their daughters,

  • as well as Vice- President Joe Biden and his family

  • were there to greet the pope.

  • He'll be in the US for six days,

  • traveling to Washington, New York, and Philadelphia

  • and will give the first ever joint address to Congress by a pope

  • He's influential and closely watched,

  • both inside and outside the Catholic Church.

  • In just over two years,

  • Pope Francis has shown the world

  • how the leader of the Catholic Church can be

  • compassionate, comedic, controversial, and captivating.

  • Here are some ways the pontiff has surprised us all.

  • For one, he certainly hasn't been shy about

  • getting up close and personal with his fans,

  • from letting someone play with his cap

  • and giving a pair of school boys a lift in the popemobile

  • to even posing in a few selfies.

  • And remember that homily when a young boy walked up on stage

  • to get a closer look at the pope, even kissing his cross?

  • But the Pontiff didn't seem to mind.

  • Several cardinals even tried to persuade the child to leave,

  • but he refused,

  • instead wrapping his arms around the pope's legs

  • and was then allowed to sit in the his chair

  • while the pope gave a speech.

  • In another endearing moment,

  • Pope Francis clowned around with a newlywed couple

  • and donned a red nose with the bride and groom.

  • And then there's the humble side of the pope.

  • At a detention center in Rome,

  • he washed the feet of two women,

  • ruffling the feathers of a few traditionalists.

  • It is written in liturgical law that

  • only men can take part in the ceremony,

  • which reenacts Jesus washing the feet of his 12 disciples,

  • all of whom were men.

  • In another sign of humility

  • Pope Francis embraced a disfigured man

  • suffering from a genetic skin condition known as neurofibromatosis.

  • That truly powerful image went viral.

  • Pope Francis has also made moves that have disturbed some conservatives

  • who believe he's making too many changes, too quickly.

  • He authorized priests to forgive the sin of abortion

  • and make it easier and faster to get an annulment.

  • He issued a papal encyclical about the dangers of climate change,

  • pleading for global action to help stop it.

  • In the wake of the attack on Charlie Hebdo,

  • the pope condemned the violence

  • but said there are limits to free speech.

  • Someone says a swear word against my mother,

  • the pope said, he's going to get a punch in the nose.

  • And throughout it all,

  • Pope Francis has earned some interesting titles.

  • In 2013, Esquire named him their best dressed man.

  • And Time, gave him the iconic label of Person of the Year.

  • Rolling Stone also elevated the pope to rock star status

  • by making him the first religious head to grace the cover

  • paired with the headline, the times they are a- changin'.

  • Germany, Hawaii, and Michigan.

  • Get ready to travel on today's roll call.

  • Wiesbaden High School. We're shouting out the Warriors today.

  • Hello to our viewers in Wiesbaden, Germany.

  • From the Hawaiian Island of Oahu,

  • say hello to the Rams.

  • They're watching from Admiral Arthur W.

  • Radford High School in Honolulu.

  • And in northern Michigan, Harbor Springs is on today's roll.

  • Great to see the swordsman of Harbor Light Christian School.

  • You learn in science that

  • black holes form when stars collapse

  • and that they have such incredibly intense gravity

  • that not even light can escape them.

  • At least that's the theory.

  • There is some controversy over whether black holes actually exist.

  • Some scientists including Stephen Hawking

  • have said they don't.

  • Others argue they're mathematically impossible.

  • Those who disagree with that say that

  • not only are they real but that two of them are about to collide.

  • Black holes are some of the strangest and

  • most mysterious objects in space.

  • Scientists say they have found new clues

  • that two black holes might be merging,

  • a phenomenon some consider the Holy Grail of physics.

  • NASA says two of its space telescopes have found new information

  • about an odd repeating light signal coming from

  • the center of a distant galaxy in the Virgo constellation

  • about 3. 5 billion light years from Earth.

  • Researchers say the new data is the best evidence

  • yet that the light signal is coming from

  • two super massive black holes,

  • and that the duo is orbiting closer together

  • than any pair detected so far.

  • Scientists were able to track the changing light patterns

  • over the past 20 years using ultraviolet data

  • from Hubble and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer.

  • The two black holes are expected to collide

  • and merge in less than a million years

  • triggering a huge explosion.

  • Why all the interest in black hole mash up?

  • For the most part, black holes are a huge mystery.

  • Scientists think there are billions of them in the universe,

  • but they can't actually see them.

  • Experts say they can detect gas and other materials

  • being sucked into the black holes.

  • In the final moments before they collide,

  • it's predicted the black holes will cause ripples in space

  • and time called gravitational waves,

  • and scientists say those waves could hold clues

  • about the fabric of our universe.

  • The Gettysburg Address is one of the most famous

  • speeches in American history,

  • but there's no known photograph

  • of President Lincoln actually giving it.

  • Why you ask? Well, it's short.

  • Like ten sentences and 272 words short.

  • Like two to three minutes short.

  • Some historians think that because it's so short,

  • photographers didn't have time to set their cameras to capture it.

  • Now that's random.

  • All right, sticking with the Civil War theme.

  • The CSS Georgia, CSS standing for Confederate States Ship,

  • served near the southeast Georgia coast.

  • It never fired a shot in battle.

  • Confederate troops intentionally sank it

  • when Union forces approached in late 1864.

  • A little more than 100 years later,

  • a dredge ran into the ship's wreckage in the Savannah River.

  • Now, the US Navy is helping recover a giant relic

  • of the American Civil War.

  • We are right now in Savannah, Georgia

  • to salvage the C. S. S. Georgia.

  • It's an old Confederate ironclad.

  • The Georgia has had numerous failed salvage attempts,

  • so there's no shortage of debris down there

  • in addition to the Georgia.

  • We're mobilized here onboard

  • a Naval Sea System's command support platform

  • moored out in the middle of the Savannah River.

  • Anytime you're working underwater

  • what it really comes down to is feeling your way around,

  • especially working in zero visibility,

  • six inches to a foot is a good day.

  • Right now we're lucky enough

  • to have the archeologist and underwater sonar device

  • that could literally pinpoint us

  • and put us onto any artifact

  • that they've previously discovered already.

  • Something we've been saying a lot of is diving into history.

  • We're actually revisiting the Civil War on every single dive,

  • and after every dive we actually have a chance

  • to take a look at some of those things from that period

  • here on deck and asking the question, what is that.

  • Even though we don't have plans for the Georgia,

  • we know a lot about the ship's construction just based on period,

  • and we've also been relying heavily

  • on the previous archaeological operations.

  • The things they found and mapped to guide us in our salvage operation.

  • Our divers are outfitted with a helmet,

  • mounted camera and light system,

  • so we can actually see what they're seeing,

  • but a little better on the camera topside.

  • We're also using a variety of sonar technologies

  • to track our divers movements

  • and effectively guide them through that debris field on the bottom.

  • Just about everywhere we step down there

  • we're walking on some piece of wreckage.

  • While the debris field is very wide,

  • I'll say it's very dense.

  • There are a good number of artifacts on the bottom,

  • and it's always a new challenge, and really, Georgia,

  • she doesn't want to give up any of her secrets easily.

  • Three things you might see in New York city,

  • pizza, the subway, and rats.

  • They're generally not seen all at once though,

  • so it's no surprise this video went viral.

  • A ravenous rodent recently recorded running

  • rapidly with a ration of pizza.

  • The slice was larger than the carrier.

  • And though we don't actually get to see him

  • eat his hard- won sample of Subway sustenance,

  • we can assume he rat- turned for it later on.

  • Guess when you're a rat, you gotta get carry- out.

  • Delivery could be a trap.

  • And now the to- go meal, made us all stop and stares.

  • Even those with unmistakable mousaphobia rodent

  • have wanted to miss it.

  • Rats all folks.

  • CNN Student News pizzas together another show tomorrow.

  • It'd be sliced to see y'all then.

Welcome to 10 minutes of international current events.

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2015年9月23日 - 字幕付きCNN学生ニュース (September 23, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle)

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