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  • (applauding)

    今ご紹介に預かった通り、カーンアカデミーは、

  • Salman: As I just introduced what Khan Academy is most known for

    5,6年前から始めたビデオ教材によって

  • is this library of videos that I started producing

    非常によく知られています。

  • almost five, six years ago now.

    まず、それらのビデオが実際どのようなものであったか

  • Before I go any further, let me just show you all a little bit of a mix

    説明させていただいてから、

  • of what the videos actually look like

    核心の話に移らせてください。

  • and then we can go a little deeper from there.

    これらの動物の化石は南アメリカの、

  • So the hypotenuse is now going to be five.

    素晴らしく、またきれいなこの地帯と、アフリカの一部でのみ発見されます。

  • These animals fossils are only found in this area of South America

  • a nice, clean band here and this part of Africa.

  • We can integrate over the surface in the notation usually is a capital sigma.

  • National Assembly they create the committee of public safety

  • which sounds like a very nice committee.

  • Notice this is an aldehyde and it's an alcohol

  • start differentiating it to affect or, and memory cells.

  • A galaxy, hey there's another galaxy.

  • Oh look there's another galaxy.

  • For dollars is there 30 million

  • plus the 20 million dollars from the American manufacturer

  • if this does not blow your mind then you have no emotion.

  • (audience laughing)

  • You know the videos there's now 2,200 of them.

  • That's kind of what I want to do until I get a hit by a bus

  • or hopefully it won't be for a while.

  • We're doing a lot more than that,I mean the videos are reaching ...

  • Actually now, on the order of about two million unique users a month.

  • We've had almost 45 million video views

  • they are being watched 2 to 300,000 times a day.

  • Before I go any deeper, I actually just gave a talk at TED down in Long Beach

  • a couple weeks ago, I don't want this to be a repetition of that talk.

  • I want this to kind of be a part two.

  • But before I go any further, I want to get a sense

  • just so I know how much background and depth I need to give.

  • How many of you all seen that talk?

  • Okay, good.

  • How many of you all have been to the site?

  • Because I want to know how much background, okay very good, very good.

  • What I want to focus on today is kind of going a little bit deeper.

  • I will give a background about what we're doing beyond the video portion.

  • Now that it isn't just me.

  • We are actually kind of a team now, we're at six people.

  • (audience laughing)

  • Some of the questions that I think have surfaced

  • is we've gotten a little bit more popular and we started to enter into domains,

  • but frankly I never thought we would enter.

  • Especially into the classroom itself.

  • Before I do that,I want to give you all a little bit of a thought experiment.

  • Imagine if we're in a juggling class and I'm your juggling instructor.

  • This week we are going to learn to juggle oranges.

  • I give you all your orange juggling kits, I give you all each four oranges

  • and I give you all a lecture on juggling oranges.

  • I say practice and in a week I will assess your orange juggling ability.

  • You practice and a week later I come back with my clipboard and I say juggle.

  • You try the best you can to juggle and different three oranges,

  • four oranges, all the rest and I say, "You can't juggle four oranges at all."

  • "Three oranges, barely can keep the oranges in the air"

  • "for more than a few seconds."

  • You are a 70% orange juggler, you are a D orange juggler.

  • I place that label on your forehead.

  • I put it in your permanent record making it all

  • but impossible for you to go in an elite juggling school.

  • (audience laughing)

  • Despite those deficiencies that you clearly have in your abilities,

  • there's the state mandated a juggling curriculum that we have to follow

  • and there's a calendar that specifies how we have to move forward.

  • We have this kind of assembly line and so I say,

  • "Well give me back the oranges. The next lesson here are some knives."

  • (audience laughing)

  • As crazy as that might appear to be

  • that's exactly what's happening in our classrooms right now.

  • It might not be as physically dangerous but it is just as mentally dangerous.

  • We have students they take an exam, they get 10% wrong,

  • 20% wrong, 30% wrong, you can even fail an exam.

  • Regardless of the fact that we've identified those deficiencies,

  • we know that the student doesn't know those concepts,

  • we have to move on to the next concept, we have this assembly line.

  • That the only thing were using the test for is to put labels

  • on peoples foreheads to separate them, to track them.

  • Though we know there's weaknesses we push them forward

  • and we're pretty much ensuring that at some future point they'r going to fail.

  • We're pretty much ensuring that motivated kids,

  • even if they have awesome teachers at some point

  • those gaps are going to come back and they're not going to be able to perform

  • once they get to some more advanced mathematics.

  • Now that we've gotten a funding ...

  • just so you know a little bit of the story how all of this happened.

  • I was literally making videos in my closet for about five years.

  • Then about a year ago Google brought me over to their campus

  • and I thought it was just like a lot of the Google engineers,

  • as parents they were using these videos for their children and all of that.

  • But they brought me in to a conference room and they said,

  • "Sal, what would you do with two million dollars?"

  • (audience laughing)

  • I said, "Is this an education context? Or is just a broader question?"

  • (audience laughing)

  • There are very different answers.

  • That happened and a little bit later, I mean this is like last year,

  • I was still in the closet.

  • (audience laughing)

  • I get a call from Larry Cohen, who's Bill Gates chief of staff,

  • and says, "I don't know if you realize this but Bill Gates likes your videos."

  • "He watches them, he uses it with his kids, and he would like to support you."

  • "Do you have some time to meet him in the near future?"

  • I said, "I think I can move around my calendar a little bit."

  • (audience laughing)

  • I think I can push back a few of the video recordings here or there.

  • But you fast forward to October of this year,

  • we got funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  • We got the funding from Google.

  • In a sense it allowed me to come out of the closet.

  • What we're now trying to do there is take these videos

  • to their natural conclusion, and address that juggling mastery problem.

  • What we're doing, if you go to the site it's all free,

  • it's a not for profit, not trying to sell anything.

  • You can start at 1 + 1 = 2 and we'll give you as many problems as you need.

  • As you get 10 in a row,

  • you can keep advancing to more and more advanced concepts.

  • The paradigm here is don't move on to a next concept

  • until you master the one you already know.

  • As an organization what we're trying to do

  • and it seems like there's already a little bit, we're getting the traction here

  • and we'll talk later and to talk about why we think we're getting that traction.

  • What we're trying to do is enable anyone, anywhere in the world for free

  • to get one an education but when we say an education,

  • to get an education that really is a mastery based education.

  • One that really ensures that someone understands the basics

  • before they move forward and they can do it all at their own pace.

  • I want to be clear, this is actually ...

  • We'll talk more about this in the second half of the talk.

  • This isn't a new idea,

  • it's actually nothing that Khan Academy doing is fundamentally new.

  • Doing videos either online or even on TV or whatever,

  • it's not a new idea when the radio was first invented,

  • when TV was first invented,

  • people thought it was going to revolutionize education.

  • Put the best teachers, broadcast them, it never happened.

  • Even when the internet kind of came out,

  • they thought that was going to be the killer [happen] for the internet.

  • When the PC was first invented,

  • they thought this was the first time we can give people self-pace learning

  • but it never got traction.

  • In the second half of my talk

  • I'd like to think a little bit about maybe why we're getting a traction.

  • It's a super important question for us as an organization

  • because we don't want to lose whatever that secret sauce might be.

  • The other interesting thing that's happened

  • and I talk a lot more about this in the other TED talk,

  • and is actually a big surprise to me,

  • is that our software and video start to get adapted in the classroom.

  • I mentioned the previous talk that it happened early on

  • even before we got funding or anything.

  • I started getting letters from teachers who's saying

  • that they were using just the videos to flip the education model.

  • They were now assigning the videos for a lecture,

  • they were assigning the videos for homework

  • and instead of doing a lecture in the classroom,

  • they were actually allowing their students to interact with each other

  • in doing problems.

  • Just with that simple technology, just the on demand video

  • they were actually able to kind of personalize

  • and make the actual classroom experience interactive.

  • Now with this kind of self-paced mastery base learning software,

  • we were approached by the Los Altos School District not to far from here,

  • "What would you do with a classroom?"

  • We said, "Well we would let every student work at their own pace."

  • The teachers role would be, they have a dashboard,

  • they would have all of the data

  • and only intervene on the students that are stuck.

  • So you could do a very focused intervention

  • and be armed with the right data to do it.

  • Or even better get a student who's already proficient in that

  • to intervene on that student

  • and then you get all the benefits of learning something even deeper

  • when you yourself are the teacher.

  • They decided to do it.

  • In Los Altos we have two fifth grade classes and two seventh grade classes

  • and they're using this as their core curriculum.

  • What I want to emphasize here and it's not always made clear

  • is when I talk about this to people, a lot of people will say,

  • "Oh this awesome."

  • Self-pace learning, mastery based, differentiate in instruction

  • but there is a crowd that starts to get a little suspicious.

  • They start saying well, "This sounds like you're automating things"

  • "but it sounds like it's very robotic."

  • "It sounds like kids in front of a computer just doing exercises all day,"

  • "listening to videos, not interacting with each other."

  • "It sounds like you're marginalizing the teacher."

  • "It sounds your deskilling the teacher,"

  • "that you're making them just do what the computers can't."

  • What I want to emphasize here is the exact opposite.

  • What we're seeing in those classrooms in Los Altos,

  • is we're seeing every moment of that teachers time

  • is spent interacting with her students, being a mentor.

  • These students are getting one on one with the teacher multiple times a week.

  • When I was in school I was lucky to get that even a few times,

  • and even in your whole career.

  • Multiple times a week.

  • They aren't doing this at the expense of project based learning

  • or investigations.

  • What this is allowing the teacher to do, it liberates the classroom.

  • So now that they can do more of the project based learning,

  • they can do more of the investigations.

  • These classrooms in Los Altos, there is more of that creative activity,

  • more of this interaction, more of this experimenting with the world

  • than you would see in any other classroom.

  • So for the first time because we have this technology

  • it's not an either or proposition.

  • You have this kind of camps of mathematical instruction.

  • Do you do kind of the traditional,

  • do a lot of problems, lecture and see a lot of traditional problems?

  • Or do you do the project based learning where you investigate things?

  • Our answer is now we can do both.

  • Even better, even on the instruction itself there's these debates

  • between old Math and new Math, how you to it?

  • The value when you have on demand video, you can do both.

  • You can actually expose the students to every possible way

  • that there is to learn Mathematics.

  • In the same classroom, you have one kid doing third grade Math

  • and you have one kid doing Algebra, and that's great.

  • The student doing the third grade Math needs to be doing the third grade Math.

  • Here she needs to fill out those gaps,

  • and the student who's doing the Algebra should be able to run forward

  • and do the Algebra.

  • Then some people say, "Oh this is bad."

  • "Already the smart kids have the advantage"

  • "and the slow kids they already have every disadvantage."

  • "Now you're making the spread even wider."

  • But what they don't realize is in these same classes

  • it's becoming impossible to figure out over a longer term

  • who those smart kids are and who the slower kids are.

  • Because even though one kid is working on third grade Math for a little while,

  • once he or she has getting those [cuts] and we see it over and over again,

  • they're able to race ahead.

  • Then three weeks later they passed up the kid who is in Algebra.