Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • (音楽)

  • Now, my subject is success, so people sometimes call me a "motivational speaker."

    私の題材は成功なので、「モチベーショナルスピーカー」だと私を呼ぶ人がいます。

  • But I want you to know right up front, I'm not a motivational speaker.

    しかし、最初に知っておいてほしいのは、私はモチベ―ショナルスピーカーではないということ。

  • I couldn't pass the height requirement.

    身長の要件を満たしていなかった。

  • And I couldn't motivate anybody.

    誰かのモチベーションを高めることはできない。

  • My employees actually call me a de-motivational speaker.

    従業員は私のことを、モチベ―ションをなくさせるスピーカーだと言います。

  • What I try to be is an informational speaker.

    私がなろうとしているのは、情報提供をするスピーカーです。

  • I went out and found out some information about success, and I'm just here to pass it on.

    成功についての情報を知ったので、それを伝えるために、ここにいます。

  • And my story started over 10 years ago, on a plane.

    私の話は10年前に遡ります。飛行機でのことです。

  • I was on my way to the TED Conference in California, and in the seat next to me was a teenage girl, and she came from a really poor family but she wanted to get somewhere in life.

    カリフォルニアのTED会議に行くところでした。私の席の隣には、10代の少女がいました。彼女はとても貧しい家庭でしたが、人生で何かを成し遂げたかった。

  • And as I tapped away on my computer, she kept asking me questions, and then out of the blue, she asked, "Are you successful?"

    私がコンピューターのキーを叩くと、彼女は何度も質問しました。そして突然、彼女はこう言いました。「あなたは成功者ですか?」と。

  • I said, "No, I'm not successful."

    「私は成功者ではありません。」と言いました。

  • Terry Fox, my hero, now there's a big success.

    私の英雄、テリー・フォックス。彼こそ大きな成功です。

  • He lost a leg to cancer, then ran thousands of miles and raised millions for cancer research.

    彼はガンで足を失ってから、何千マイルも走りました。そしてガン研究に何百万も寄付しました。

  • Or Bill Gates, a guy who owns his own plane and doesn't have to sit next to some kid asking him questions.

    ビル・ゲイツ自分の飛行機を所有していて、質問してくる子供の隣には座らない人。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But then I told her about some of the stuff I'd done.

    しかし、私がしたことをいくつか彼女に伝えました。

  • I love communications, and I've won lots of awards in marketing.

    コミュニケーションは好きなので、マーケティングでたくさんの賞を獲得しました。

  • I love running, and I still sometimes win my age groupold farts over 60.

    走るのが好きなので、同年代のグループでは今だに勝つことがあります。60歳以上のおじいちゃんたち。

  • My fastest marathon is 2 hours and 43 minutes.

    私の最速のマラソン記録は、2時間43分。

  • To run the 26 miles, or 42 kilometers.

    26マイルもしくは42キロです。

  • I've run over 50 marathons, in all seven continents.

    7大陸全ての50以上のマラソンで走ったことがあります。

  • This was a run my wife and I did up the Inca trail to Machu Picchu in Peru.

    これは妻と私がペルーで、インカ道からマチュピチュまで走った写真です。

  • And to qualify for the seven continents, we had to run a marathon in Antarctica.

    7大陸の要件を満たすために、南極大陸でのマラソンを走らなければなりませんでした。

  • But when we got there, it didn't look nice and calm like this.

    しかし、そこに着いたときには、この写真のように穏やかではありませんでした。

  • It looked like thisthe waves were so high we couldn't get to the shore.

    こんな感じでした。波は高くて、岸まで行くことができませんでした。

  • So we sailed 200 miles further south to where the seas were calm, and ran the entire 26-mile marathon on the boat.

    だから200マイル南の海が穏やかなところまで行きました。そして26マイル完全マラソンを走りました。船上で。

  • Four hundred and twenty-two laps around the deck of that little boat.

    小さな船のデッキまわりを422ラップ

  • My wife and I have also climbed two of the world's seven summits.

    妻と私は世界七大陸最高峰のうち2つに登りました。

  • The highest mountains on each continent.

    それぞれの大陸でもっとも高い山。

  • We climbed Aconcagua, the highest mountain on the American continent.

    アメリカ大陸で最も高い山であるアコングアに登りました。

  • And Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa.

    それからアフリカのキリマンジャロ。

  • Well, to be honest, I puked my way to the top of Kilimanjaro.

    正直、キリマンジャロの頂上に行く途中で私は吐きました。

  • I got altitude sickness, I got no sympathy from my wife.

    高山病にかかったのです。妻は全く同情してくれませんでした。

  • She passed me and did a lap around the top while I was still struggling up there.

    彼女は私を追い抜くと、私が登ってくるまでの間、頂上を一周していました。

  • In spite of that, we're still together, and have been for over 35 years.

    それにも関わらず、私たちはまだ一緒にいて、35年以上になります。

  • I'd say that's a success these days.

    最近ではそれが成功だと言えるかもしれません。

  • So I said to the girl: "Well, you know, I guess I have had some success."

    だから彼女に言いました。「そうだな。成功していることもあるかな。」

  • And then she said: "Okay, so are you a millionaire?"

    そしたら彼女は、「あなたは億万長者?」って言った。

  • Now, I didn't know what to say because when I grew up, it was bad manners to talk about money.

    何て言ったら良いのか分からない。だって私が若い頃は、お金について話すのは悪いマナーだったから。

  • But I figured I'd better be honest, and I said, "Yeah I'm a millionaire, but I don't know how it happened, I never went after the money, and it's not that important to me."

    ですが、正直になるべきだと思った。そしてこう言った。「うん。私は億万長者だよ。しかしどうやったのかは覚えていない。お金を追いかけたことはなかった。お金は私にとってそれほど重要ではないんだ。」

  • She said, "Maybe not to you, but it is to me—I don't want to be poor all my life, I want to get somewhere, but it's never going to happen."

    彼女は言った。「あなたにとってはそうかもしれないけど、私にとっては重要よ。人生ずっと貧しいままなんて嫌だ。どこかに行きたい。でもそれは無理だわ。」

  • I said, "Well, why not?"

    私は言った。「どうしてだい?」

  • She said, "Well, you know, I'm not very smart, I'm not doing great in school."

    彼女は「だって、私はあまり賢くないもの。学校であまり良い成績じゃないわ。」

  • I said, "So what? I'm not smart—I barely passed high school."

    私は「だから何だい?私も賢くないよ。高校もなんとか卒業したぐらい。

  • I had absolutely nothing going for me, I was never voted most popular or most likely to succeed.

    私には何もなかった。人気がある人とか、成功するだろうって人に言われたこともなかった。

  • I started a whole new category, most likely to fail, but in the end, I did okayso if I can do it, you can do it.

    全く新しいカテゴリーを始めたんだ ー 「多分失敗するだろう」というもの。しかし最後には、なんとかなった。私にできるなら、君にもできる。」

  • And then she asked me the big question: "Okay, so what really leads to success?"

    そして彼女は次の大きな質問をしたんだ。「わかったわ。じゃあ何が成功に結び付くの?」

  • I said, "Jeez, sorry, I don't know, I guess somehow I did it, I don't know how I did it."

    私は言った。「ごめん。知らないんだ。どうにかやったけど、どうやったのは分からない。」

  • So I get off the plane and go to the TED Conference, and I'm standing in a room full of extraordinarily successful people in many fieldsbusiness, science, arts, health, technology, the environment.

    それから私は飛行機を降りてTED会議へ行く。素晴らしい、多くの分野の成功者でいっぱいの部屋に私は立っている。ビジネスとか、科学、芸術、健康、テクノロジー、環境など

  • When it hit me: Why don't I ask them what helped them succeed, and find out what really leads to success for everyone?

    そうして思いついたんだ。彼らに成功の秘訣を聞いてみたらどうだろうって。みんなの成功は何によって持たらされたのかって。

  • So I was all excited to get out there and start talking to these great people, when the self-doubt set in.

    だからそんな素晴らしい人たちと話すのをすごく楽しみにしていたのですが、そこで自信喪失してしまいました。

  • I mean, why would people want to talk to me?

    私と会話なんてしてくれるだろうか?

  • I'm not a famous journalist—I'm not even a journalist.

    私は有名なジャーナリストではない。ジャーナリストでもない。

  • So I was ready to stop the project before it even began, when who comes walking towards me but Ben Cohen, the famous co-founder of Ben & Jerry's ice cream.

    だから、始まる前に、プロジェクトをやめようと思っていた。そのとき、ベン・コーヘンが歩いて来た。有名なベン&ジェリーのアイスリームの共同創始者だ。

  • I figured it was now or never, I pushed through the self-doubt, jumped out in front of him, and said, "Ben, I'm working on this project."

    今しかないと思った。自信喪失を押しのけて、彼の前に飛び出して、こう言った。「ベン、あるプロジェクトを手がけていて、

  • "I don't even know what to ask you, but can you tell me what helped you succeed?"

    何を聞いたら良いのかも分かりませんが、何によって成功したのか教えてくれませんか?」

  • He said, "Yeah, sure, come on, let's go for a coffee."

    彼は言った。「もちろん。おいで。コーヒーを飲みに行こう。」

  • And over coffee and ice cream, Ben told me his story.

    コーヒーとアイスクリームを食べながら、ベンは彼の話をしてくれました。

  • Now here we are over 10 years later, and I've interviewed over 500 successful people face-to-face, and collected thousands of other success stories.

    そして私たちは10年後ここにいます。私は500人以上の成功者に直接インタビューしました。他の成功話も何千と集めました。

  • I wanted to find the common factors for success in all fields, so I had to interview people in careers ranging from A to Z.

    成功の共通要因を探したかったのです。全ての分野で。AからZまで幅広いキャリアの人たちにインタビューする必要がありました。

  • These are just the careers I interviewed beginning with the letter A, and in most cases more than one person.

    Aから始まるキャリアだけでもこれだけあります。そして多くの場合、1人以上インタビューしました。

  • I interviewed six successful accountants, five corporate auditors, five astronauts who had been into space, four actors who had won the Academy Award for Best Actor, three of the world's top astrophysicists, six of the world's leading architects and, oh yeah, four Nobel Prize winners.

    6人の成功している会計士、5人の監査役、宇宙に行ったことがある5人の宇宙飛行士、アカデミー賞で最優秀俳優を獲得した4人の俳優、世界トップの天体物理学者3人、世界トップの建築家6人そして4人のノーベル賞受賞者。

  • Yeah, I know it doesn't start with A, but it's kind of cool.

    Aから始まっていませんが、すごいでしょう。

  • And I want to say a sincere thanks to all the great people that I've interviewed over the years.

    過去何年もの間にインタビューした素晴らしい人々みんなに感謝の気持ちを述べたいと思います。

  • This really is their story; I'm just the messenger.

    これは本当は彼らのストーリーです。私はただのメッセンジャー。

  • The really big job was taking all the interviews and analyzing them, word by word, line by line, and sorting them into all the factors that people said helped them succeed.

    最大の仕事は、全てのインタビューを使って、単語ごと、文ごとに分析したことでした。そして何が成功に結び付いたのか要因の全てを分類したこと。

  • And then you start to see the big factors that are common to most people's success.

    そうすると、ほとんどの人の成功に共通している大きな要因が見えてきました。

  • Altogether, I analyzed and sorted millions of words.

    全部で、何百万もの単語を分析し、分類しました。

  • Do you know how much work that is?

    それがどれほどの作業か想像できますか?

  • That's all I do, day and nightsort and analyze.

    それが私のしたことの全て。明けても暮れても、分類と分析。

  • I'll tell you, if I ever get my hands on that kid on the plane... actually, if I do, I'll thank her.

    言っておこう。もし飛行機でのあの子供に会えたら・・・実際に会えたら、彼女に感謝します。

  • Because I've never had so much fun and met so many interesting people.

    だってこれほど楽しくて、興味深い人にたくさん会えたのですから。

  • And now I can answer her question. [What really leads to success?]

    今、彼女の質問に答えることができます。

  • I discovered the eight traits successful people have in common, or the eight to be great.

    成功している人に共通している8つの特徴が分かりました。

  • Love what you do, work really hard.

    していることを好きであること。一生懸命働く。

  • Focus on one thing, not everything.

    全部ではなくて、1つのことに集中する。

  • Keep pushing yourself, come up with good ideas.

    自分を追い込み続ける。良いアイディアを思いつく。

  • Keep improving yourself and what you do.

    自分自身、していることを成長し続ける。

  • Serve others something of value, because success isn't just about me, me, me.

    何か価値のあるものを他人に提供する。成功は自分ばかりのものではないから。

  • And persist, because there's no overnight success.

    そして持続。一晩での成功はあり得ないから。

  • Why did I pick these?

    なぜこれらを選んだのか?

  • Because when I added up all the comments in my interviews, more people said those eight things helped them than anything else.

    インタビューでのコメントを全部足していくと、多くの人がこれら8つが他の何よりも役立ったと言ったからです。

  • The eight traits are really the heart of success, the foundation, and then on top we build the specific skills that we need for our particular field or career.

    8つの特徴は本当に、成功の核となるものです。基礎であり、その上に、ある特定の能力を積み上げていく。特定の分野やキャリアに必要とされるものを。

  • Technical skills, analytical skills, people skills, creative skillslots of other skills we can add on top, depending on our field.

    テクニカルスキル、分析能力、対人能力、クリエイティブな能力など。他にもたくさんの能力を積み上げていくことができます。それぞれの分野によって。

  • But no matter what field we're in, these eight traits will be at the heart of our success.

    しかしどの分野であっても、これらの8つの特徴は成功の核となるものです。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

(音楽)

字幕と単語

A2 初級 日本語 成功 インタビュー 分野 分析 能力 分類

【TED-ED】成功する人の8つの特徴 - リチャード・セントジョン

  • 377097 14054
    Zenn   に公開 2020 年 08 月 06 日
動画の中の単語

前のバージョンに戻す