Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • In the great 1980s movie "The Blues Brothers,"

    1980年代の大作映画では "ブルース・ブラザース"

  • there's a scene where John Belushi goes to visit Dan Aykroyd in his apartment

    ジョン・ベルーシのシーンがある ダン・エイクロイドを訪ねて

  • in Chicago for the very first time.

    初めてシカゴで

  • It's a cramped, tiny space

    狭くて狭い空間です。

  • and it's just three feet away from the train tracks.

    あと三尺 線路から

  • As John sits on Dan's bed,

    ジョンがダンのベッドに座ると

  • a train goes rushing by,

    電車が突っ込んでくる

  • rattling everything in the room.

    部屋中をガタガタにして

  • John asks, "How often does that train go by?"

    ジョンは、「どのくらいの頻度で "あの列車が通り過ぎた?"

  • Dan replies, "So often, you won't even notice it."

    ダンは、「だから、あなたはしないことが多い」と答えます。 "それに気づかない"

  • And then, something falls off the wall.

    そして、壁から何かが落ちてくる。

  • We all know what he's talking about.

    彼が何を言っているかは皆知っています。

  • As human beings, we get used to everyday things

    人間としては、慣れてくると にちじょうのことに

  • really fast.

    本当に早いです。

  • As a product designer, it's my job to see those everyday things,

    プロダクトデザイナーとして そういう日常を見るのが私の仕事です。

  • to feel them, and try to improve upon them.

    感じて、試してみてください。 を改善することができます。

  • For example, see this piece of fruit?

    例えば、この果物を見てください。

  • See this little sticker?

    この小さなステッカーを見て

  • That sticker wasn't there when I was a kid.

    あのシールはなかった 子供の頃に

  • But somewhere as the years passed,

    しかし、年月が経つにつれ、どこかで

  • someone had the bright idea to put that sticker on the fruit.

    案の定 そのシールを果物に貼るために

  • Why?

    なぜ?

  • So it could be easier for us

    だから、私たちにとっては簡単なことかもしれません。

  • to check out at the grocery counter.

    調べるために 食料品売り場で

  • Well that's great,

    そうか......それは良かったな。

  • we can get in and out of the store quickly.

    出入りできる 速やかに店舗へ。

  • But now, there's a new problem.

    しかし、今、新たな問題が発生しています。

  • When we get home and we're hungry

    家に帰ってお腹が空いたら

  • and we see this ripe, juicy piece of fruit on the counter,

    この熟したジューシーな一枚を見ていると カウンターの上の果物の

  • we just want to pick it up and eat it.

    拾いたいだけ と食べてみてください。

  • Except now, we have to look for this little sticker.

    今のところは別として この小さなステッカーのために

  • And dig at it with our nails, damaging the flesh.

    爪で掘るんだ 肉体にダメージを与える

  • Then rolling up that sticker --

    そのステッカーを巻き上げて...

  • you know what I mean.

    分かっているはずです。

  • And then trying to flick it off your fingers.

    そして、フリックしようとすると 指から外して

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • It's not fun,

    楽しくないですよね。

  • not at all.

    全然

  • But something interesting happened.

    しかし、面白いことが起こりました。

  • See the first time you did it, you probably felt those feelings.

    最初にやった時の様子を見てください。 そんな気持ちを感じていたのではないでしょうか。

  • You just wanted to eat the piece of fruit.

    フルーツの欠片を食べたかっただけでしょ。

  • You felt upset.

    動揺していたんですね。

  • You just wanted to dive in.

    飛び込みたかっただけだろ

  • By the 10th time,

    10回目までに

  • you started to become less upset

    腑に落ちない

  • and you just started peeling the label off.

    と言って皮を剥き始めた ラベルを剥がします。

  • By the 100th time, at least for me,

    100回目までに 少なくとも私にとっては

  • I became numb to it.

    痺れてしまいました。

  • I simply picked up the piece of fruit,

    私は単純に果実の欠片を拾った。

  • dug at it with my nails, tried to flick it off,

    爪で掘ってみました。 をちらつかせようとした。

  • and then wondered,

    と疑問に思いました。

  • "Was there another sticker?"

    "別のステッカーがあったのか?"

  • So why is that?

    では、なぜそうなるのか?

  • Why do we get used to everyday things?

    なぜ日常的なものに慣れてしまうのか?

  • Well as human beings, we have limited brain power.

    人間としてはね 私たちの脳力は限られています。

  • And so our brains encode the everyday things we do into habits

    それで私たちの脳は 習慣化

  • so we can free up space to learn new things.

    スペースを空けるために 新しいことを学ぶために

  • It's a process called habituation

    それは慣れと呼ばれるプロセスだ

  • and it's one of the most basic ways, as humans, we learn.

    と、最も基本的な方法の一つです。 人間として学ぶ

  • Now, habituation isn't always bad.

    慣れが悪いとは限らない

  • Remember learning to drive?

    運転教習を覚えていますか?

  • I sure do.

    そうだな

  • Your hands clenched at 10 and 2 on the wheel,

    あなたの手は10と2で握りしめている 車輪の上で

  • looking at every single object out there --

    いちいち そこにあるオブジェクト

  • the cars, the lights, the pedestrians.

    車、ライト、歩行者。

  • It's a nerve-wracking experience.

    緊張感があります。

  • So much so, that I couldn't even talk to anyone else in the car

    それほどまでに、私はそれさえもできなかった 車内で人と話す

  • and I couldn't even listen to music.

    と音楽も聴けない状態でした。

  • But then something interesting happened.

    しかし、その後、面白いことが起きました。

  • As the weeks went by, driving became easier and easier.

    週を追うごとに 運転が楽になりました。

  • You habituated it.

    習慣化したんだな。

  • It started to become fun and second nature.

    になり始めました。 楽しさと第二の自然。

  • And then, you could talk to your friends again

    そして、あなたは話すことができました。 またお友達に

  • and listen to music.

    と音楽を聴く。

  • So there's a good reason why our brains habituate things.

    ということで、それなりの理由があって 私たちの脳は物事を習慣化します。

  • If we didn't, we'd notice every little detail,

    そうしないと気がつかない 細かいところまで

  • all the time.

    いつも

  • It would be exhausting,

    疲れるだろう。

  • and we'd have no time to learn about new things.

    時間がない 新しいことを学ぶために

  • But sometimes, habituation isn't good.

    でも、たまにはね。 慣れは良くない

  • If it stops us from noticing the problems that are around us,

    それが気づかないようにしてくれれば 身の回りの問題を

  • well, that's bad.

    それはまずいな

  • And if it stops us from noticing and fixing those problems,

    そして、それが私たちが気づかないようにしてくれたら と、それらの問題を修正しています。

  • well, then that's really bad.

    そうか、それは本当に悪いことだな。

  • Comedians know all about this.

    お笑い芸人はこれを知っている

  • Jerry Seinfeld's entire career was built on noticing those little details,

    ジェリー・サインフェルドの全キャリアは 些細なことに気づくことで

  • those idiotic things we do every day that we don't even remember.

    日頃の馬鹿げたこと 覚えてもいないのに

  • He tells us about the time he visited his friends

    その時のことを教えてくれます。 友人を訪ねて

  • and he just wanted to take a comfortable shower.

    と思っていたのですが 快適なシャワー。

  • He'd reach out and grab the handle and turn it slightly one way,

    彼は手を伸ばしてハンドルをつかむだろう と少しだけ片方に回します。

  • and it was 100 degrees too hot.

    と100度の暑さでした。

  • And then he'd turn it the other way, and it was 100 degrees too cold.

    そして、それを逆にしてしまう。 と100度は寒すぎました。

  • He just wanted a comfortable shower.

    彼は快適なシャワーを望んでいた

  • Now, we've all been there,

    さて、私たちはみんな経験してきました。

  • we just don't remember it.

    覚えていないだけだ

  • But Jerry did,

    でもジェリーがやったんだ

  • and that's a comedian's job.

    それが芸人の仕事です。

  • But designers, innovators and entrepreneurs,

    しかし、デザイナー、イノベーター と起業家。

  • it's our job to not just notice those things,

    気づくだけが仕事ではない それらのことを

  • but to go one step further and try to fix them.

    もう一歩踏み込んで と修正してみてください。

  • See this, this person,

    これを見てください、この人。

  • this is Mary Anderson.

    こちらはメアリー・アンダーソン

  • In 1902 in New York City,

    1902年にニューヨークで

  • she was visiting.

    彼女は訪問していた

  • It was a cold, wet, snowy day and she was warm inside a streetcar.

    寒くて、雨が降って、雪が降っている日でした。 と路面電車の中で温かく見守っていました。

  • As she was going to her destination, she noticed the driver opening the window

    彼女は目的地に向かっていた。 運転手が窓を開けているのに気付いた

  • to clean off the excess snow so he could drive safely.

    余分な雪を取り除くために 安全に運転できるように

  • When he opened the window, though, he let all this cold, wet air inside,

    しかし、窓を開けてみると 彼はこの冷たく湿った空気を室内に入れていた。

  • making all the passengers miserable.

    乗客を惨めにさせる

  • Now probably, most of those passengers just thought,

    今はおそらく、それらのほとんどが 乗客はただ思っただけ。

  • "It's a fact of life, he's got to open the window to clean it.

    "それは人生の事実であり、彼には をクリックして窓を開けて掃除をします。

  • That's just how it is."

    "そういうものだ"

  • But Mary didn't.

    しかし、メアリーはそうしなかった。

  • Mary thought,

    メアリーは思った。

  • "What if the diver could actually clean the windshield from the inside

    "もしダイバーが実際に掃除できたら? 内側からフロントガラスを

  • so that he could stay safe and drive

    安全に運転できるように

  • and the passengers could actually stay warm?"

    と乗客は "実際に暖かくなるのか?"

  • So she picked up her sketchbook right then and there,

    それで彼女はスケッチブックを拾った その場その場で

  • and began drawing what would become the world's first windshield wiper.

    となるものを描き始めました。 世界初のフロントガラスワイパー。

  • Now as a product designer, I try to learn from people like Mary

    今はプロダクトデザイナーとして 私はメアリーのような人から学ぶようにしています

  • to try to see the world the way it really is,

    世界を見ようとする ありのままの姿を

  • not the way we think it is.

    私たちが思っているような方法ではなく

  • Why?

    なぜ?

  • Because it's easy to solve a problem that almost everyone sees.

    問題が解決しやすいから ほとんどの人が見ている

  • But it's hard to solve a problem that almost no one sees.

    しかし、問題を解決するのは難しい ほとんど誰も見ていない

  • Now some people think you're born with this ability

    今では、一部の人はこう考えています。 生まれながらにしてこれだけの力を持っている

  • or you're not,

    でなければ、あなたはそうではありません。

  • as if Mary Anderson was hardwired at birth to see the world more clearly.

    まるでメアリー・アンダーソンが生まれながらにして生まれたかのように よりはっきりと世界を見ることができるようになります。

  • That wasn't the case for me.

    私の場合はそうではありませんでした。

  • I had to work at it.

    私はそれで仕事をしなければなりませんでした。

  • During my years at Apple,

    アップルにいた頃

  • Steve Jobs challenged us to come into work every day,

    スティーブ・ジョブズの挑戦 に毎日出勤しています。

  • to see our products through the eyes of the customer,

    を通して製品をご覧ください。 お客様の目線で

  • the new customer,

    新しいお客様。

  • the one that has fears and possible frustrations

    怖いもの知らず 悔しい思いをすることがあります。

  • and hopeful exhilaration that their new technology product

    と希望に満ちた爽快感があります。 新技術製品

  • could work straightaway for them.

    彼らのためにすぐに働くことができました。

  • He called it staying beginners,

    ステイ初心者と言っていました。

  • and wanted to make sure that we focused on those tiny little details

    を確認したいと思っていました。 些細なことにこだわる

  • to make them faster, easier and seamless for the new customers.

    より速く、より簡単に、そしてシームレスにするために 新しいお客様のために

  • So I remember this clearly in the very earliest days of the iPod.

    だから、私はこれをはっきりと覚えています。 iPodのごく初期の頃の話です。

  • See, back in the '90s,

    90年代の話だ

  • being a gadget freak like I am,

    私のようなガジェットフリークであること。

  • I would rush out to the store for the very, very latest gadget.

    あわててお店に出かけると 非常に、非常に、非常に最新のガジェットのために。

  • I'd take all the time to get to the store,

    店に行くのに時間がかかってしまう。

  • I'd check out, I'd come back home, I'd start to unbox it.

    チェックアウトして帰ってきます。 私なら箱を開け始めます。

  • And then, there was another little sticker:

    そして、そこには もう一つの小さなステッカー

  • the one that said, "Charge before use."

    "使う前に充電しろ "と言ったやつだ

  • What!

    何だよ!

  • I can't believe it!

    信じられない!

  • I just spent all this time buying this product

    私は今までの時間を費やして 買い付け

  • and now I have to charge before use.

    と、今では使う前に充電しないといけなくなりました。

  • I have to wait what felt like an eternity to use that coveted new toy.

    私は永遠のように感じたことを待たなければならない その切望された新しいおもちゃを使うために。

  • It was crazy.

    狂気の沙汰でした。

  • But you know what?

    でもね

  • Almost every product back then did that.

    当時のほぼ全ての製品がそうでした。

  • When it had batteries in it,

    電池が入っていた時

  • you had to charge it before you used it.

    課金しなければならない 使う前に

  • Well, Steve noticed that

    スティーブは気づいた

  • and he said,

    と言っていました。

  • "We're not going to let that happen to our product."

    "私たちはそれをさせるつもりはありません "私たちの製品に起こること"

  • So what did we do?

    で、私たちは何をしたの?

  • Typically, when you have a product that has a hard drive in it,

    通常、製品を持っている場合 ハードディスクが入っている

  • you run it for about 30 minutes in the factory

    稼動させてみると 工場内30分

  • to make sure that hard drive's going to be working years later

    ハードドライブを確認するために 年を越す

  • for the customer after they pull it out of the box.

    の後に顧客のために 箱から引っ張り出す。

  • What did we do instead?

    代わりに何をしたのか?

  • We ran that product for over two hours.

    その製品を2時間以上走らせました。

  • Why?

    なぜ?

  • Well, first off, we could make a higher quality product,

    まず第一に、私たちが作ることができるのは より高い品質の製品です。

  • be easy to test,

    テストしやすい

  • and make sure it was great for the customer.

    と、それを確認して、それが素晴らしいものであることを確認してください お客様のために。

  • But most importantly,

    しかし、何よりも重要なのは

  • the battery came fully charged right out of the box,

    満充電 箱から出してすぐ。

  • ready to use.

    を使用する準備ができています。

  • So that customer, with all that exhilaration,

    だから、そのお客さん。 その爽快感で

  • could just start using the product.

    製品を使い始めることができました。

  • It was great, and it worked.

    素晴らしかったし、効果もあった。

  • People liked it.

    みんなに好かれていました。

  • Today, almost every product that you get that's battery powered

    今日は、ほぼすべての製品 電池式のものを手に入れると

  • comes out of the box fully charged,

    完全に充電された箱から出てきます。

  • even if it doesn't have a hard drive.

    ハードディスクがなくても

  • But back then, we noticed that detail and we fixed it,

    しかし、当時は その詳細を修正しました。

  • and now everyone else does that as well.

    そして今、みんなもそうしています。

  • No more, "Charge before use."

    "使用前にチャージ "は不要です。

  • So why am I telling you this?

    では、なぜ私はこの話をしているのでしょうか?

  • Well, it's seeing the invisible problem,

    まあ、それは見えない問題を見ているということです。

  • not just the obvious problem, that's important,

    明らかな問題だけではなく それが大事なんだ

  • not just for product design, but for everything we do.

    プロダクトデザインだけではなく しかし、私たちがするすべてのことに対して

  • You see, there are invisible problems all around us,

    目に見えない問題がある 私たちの周りのすべての

  • ones we can solve.

    私たちが解決できるもの

  • But first we need to see them, to feel them.

    しかし、まず必要なのは 見て、感じて

  • So, I'm hesitant to give you any tips

    ということで、ヒントをあげるのを躊躇しているのですが

  • about neuroscience or psychology.

    神経科学や心理学について

  • There's far too many experienced people in the TED community

    経験者が多すぎる TEDコミュニティの中で

  • who would know much more about that than I ever will.

    詳しい者 今まで以上に

  • But let me leave you with a few tips that I do,

    しかし、私はあなたに残させてください 私が行ういくつかのコツ。

  • that we all can do, to fight habituation.

    誰にでもできること 慣れと戦うために。

  • My first tip is to look broader.

    私の第一のヒントは、もっと広く見ることです。

  • You see, when you're tackling a problem,

    ほら、問題に取り組むときに

  • sometimes, there are a lot of steps that lead up to that problem.

    ときには段差が多い その問題につながる

  • And sometimes, a lot of steps after it.

    そして、時には、たくさんの の後のステップ。

  • If you can take a step back and look broader,

    一歩引いてみれば と広めに見てください。

  • maybe you can change some of those boxes

    箱をいくつか変えられるかもしれない

  • before the problem.

    問題の前に

  • Maybe you can combine them.

    組み合わせてもいいかもしれませんね。

  • Maybe you can remove them altogether to make that better.

    多分、あなたはそれらを完全に削除することができます。 それを良くするために

  • Take thermostats, for instance.

    サーモスタットを例に挙げてみましょう。

  • In the 1900s when they first came out, they were really simple to use.

    彼らが出てきた1900年代には 彼らは本当に簡単に使用することができました。

  • You could turn them up or turn them down.

    上にしても下にしてもいいんじゃない?

  • People understood them.

    人々は彼らを理解していました。

  • But in the 1970s,

    しかし、1970年代には

  • the energy crisis struck,

    エネルギー危機が襲った。

  • and customers started thinking about how to save energy.

    とお客様が考えるようになり どうやってエネルギーを節約するか。

  • So what happened?

    で、何があったの?

  • Thermostat designers decided to add a new step.

    サーモスタット設計者が決定 をクリックして新しいステップを追加します。

  • Instead of just turning up and down,

    上を向いて下を向くのではなく

  • you now had to program it.

    あなたはそれをプログラムしなければなりませんでした。

  • So you could tell it the temperature you wanted at a certain time.

    だから、あなたはそれを温度を伝えることができました。 欲しいと思った時に

  • Now that seemed great.

    今、それは素晴らしいことのように思えた。

  • Every thermostat had started adding that feature.

    すべてのサーモスタットには その機能の追加を開始しました。

  • But it turned out that no one saved any energy.

    しかし、それは誰も は、あらゆるエネルギーを節約しました。

  • Now, why is that?

    さて、それはなぜでしょうか?

  • Well, people couldn't predict the future.

    まあ、人は未来を予測できなかった。

  • They just didn't know how their weeks would change season to season,

    彼らは自分たちの週がどうなっているか知らなかった は季節ごとに変化していきます。

  • year to year.

    年から年へ。

  • So no one was saving energy,

    だから誰も省エネをしていなかった。

  • and what happened?

    何があったの?

  • Thermostat designers went back to the drawing board

    サーモスタットの設計者が戻ってきた 原案に戻ろう

  • and they focused on that programming step.

    と、そのプログラミングのステップに焦点を当てていました。

  • They made better U.I.s,

    彼らはより良いU.I.S.を作った

  • they made better documentation.

    彼らはより良いドキュメントを作ってくれました。

  • But still, years later, people were not saving any energy

    それでも数年後には 人は省エネではなかった

  • because they just couldn't predict the future.

    だって、それができなかったから 未来を予測する

  • So what did we do?

    で、私たちは何をしたの?

  • We put a machine-learning algorithm in instead of the programming

    機械学習アルゴリズムを プログラミングの代わりに

  • that would simply watch when you turned it up and down,

    見ているだけ 上下に回した時に

  • when you liked a certain temperature when you got up,

    好みの温度になると あなたが立ち上がった時