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  • One of our most frequently asked questions on our social networking sites and on our

  • tours is, "do big cats like tigers and lions purr?" This is a longstanding question and

  • there is quite a lot of debate over this topic within the scientific community. For many

  • species the dating is lacking or inconclusive and no definitive statement can really be

  • made. Approximately fifteen species of wild cat can purr; this includes lynx, servals,

  • bobcats, caracals, ocelots, cheetahs and cougars.

  • Some say that the greater cats--lion, tigers, leopards, and jaguars--can roar but are unable

  • to purr. While some say that lesser cats, which is every other species, including domesticate

  • cats, can purr but not roar. Each of these theories revolves around the hyoid bone, which

  • connects the tongue to the roof of the mouth. In the greater cats this bone is flexible,

  • which allows them to roar. But this also prevents them from purring. But in the lesser cats

  • the hyoid bone is solid, which is why these cat's can't roar, but they can purr. Snow

  • leopards are an exception to these theories because they have a flexible hyoid bone, but

  • they have never been heard to roar.

  • Others believe that lions, tigers, leopards and jaguars can purr, but they can only do

  • so on exhale, which then creates another debate about what exactly a true purr is. Some say

  • that a true purr can only be produced when the cat inhales as well as when it exhales.

  • While everyone knows that cats purr when they're content and happy, many people are unaware

  • that cats purr for other reasons such as, during traumatic moments, when suddenly and

  • violently injured--even at moments near death a cat will often purr. Another interesting

  • fact is the measurable Hz of a cat's purr lies between 25 and 150 Hz, which coincidentally

  • is the same sound frequency range that has been documented to stimulate bone growth and

  • healing. Some experts even suggest that purring releases endorphins that reduce pain while

  • healing proceeds.

  • So to summarize: yes big cats do purr. The largest species that we know of is the cougar.

  • Cheetahs also purr, but cougars can grow to a heavier weight. Some say tigers, lions,

  • leopards and jaguars can purr but only while exhaling. We know they're capable of making

  • other noises including roaring, chuffing, and...miscellaneous. But none of our keepers

  • have heard any of our greater cats purr... This topic will probably be debated for years

  • to come. So...what do you think?

  • Please favorite, like, subscribe, and share so we can see what other viewers have to say

  • about this topic. You can follow BigCatRescue on Facebook or google+. If you want to see

  • if big cats like catnip or if big cats chase laser pointers, check out the highlighted

  • videos.

  • One of our most frequently asked questions on our social networking sites and on our

  • tours is, "do big cats like tigers and lions purr?" This is a longstanding question and

  • there is quite a lot of debate over this topic within the scientific community. For many

  • species the dating is lacking or inconclusive and no definitive statement can really be

  • made. Approximately fifteen species of wild cat can purr; this includes lynx, servals,

  • bobcats, caracals, ocelots, cheetahs and cougars.

  • Some say that the greater cats--lion, tigers, leopards, and jaguars--can roar but are unable

  • to purr. While some say that lesser cats, which is every other species, including domesticate

  • cats, can purr but not roar. Each of these theories revolves around the hyoid bone, which

  • connects the tongue to the roof of the mouth. In the greater cats this bone is flexible,

  • which allows them to roar. But this also prevents them from purring. But in the lesser cats

  • the hyoid bone is solid, which is why these cat's can't roar, but they can purr. Snow

  • leopards are an exception to these theories because they have a flexible hyoid bone, but

  • they have never been heard to roar.

  • Others believe that lions, tigers, leopards and jaguars can purr, but they can only do

  • so on exhale, which then creates another debate about what exactly a true purr is. Some say

  • that a true purr can only be produced when the cat inhales as well as when it exhales.

  • While everyone knows that cats purr when they're content and happy, many people are unaware

  • that cats purr for other reasons such as, during traumatic moments, when suddenly and

  • violently injured--even at moments near death a cat will often purr. Another interesting

  • fact is the measurable Hz of a cat's purr lies between 25 and 150 Hz, which coincidentally

  • is the same sound frequency range that has been documented to stimulate bone growth and

  • healing. Some experts even suggest that purring releases endorphins that reduce pain while

  • healing proceeds.

  • So to summarize: yes big cats do purr. The largest species that we know of is the cougar.

  • Cheetahs also purr, but cougars can grow to a heavier weight. Some say tigers, lions,

  • leopards and jaguars can purr but only while exhaling. We know they're capable of making

  • other noises including roaring, chuffing, and...miscellaneous. But none of our keepers

  • have heard any of our greater cats purr... This topic will probably be debated for years

  • to come. So...what do you think?

  • Please favorite, like, subscribe, and share so we can see what other viewers have to say

  • about this topic. You can follow BigCatResque on Facebook or google+. If you want to see

  • if big cats like catnip or if big cats chase laser pointers, check out the highlighted

  • videos.

One of our most frequently asked questions on our social networking sites and on our

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大きな猫は鳴くのか? (Do Big Cats Purr?)

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    VoiceTube に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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