Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So in the oasis of intelligentsia that is TED,

    翻訳: Takamitsu Hirono 校正: Ami Okuno

  • I stand here before you this evening

    インテリのオアシスである

  • as an expert in dragging heavy stuff around cold places.

    TEDのみなさんを前にして

  • I've been leading polar expeditions for most of my adult life,

    寒い場所で重いものを引っ張るエキスパートの私が お話をさせていただきます

  • and last month, my teammate Tarka L'Herpiniere and I

    成人してからのほとんどは極地での探検者 として過ごしてきました

  • finished the most ambitious expedition I've ever attempted.

    先月 チームメイトである タルカ・ラピニエール と

  • In fact, it feels like I've been transported straight here

    人生でもっとも野心的な探検を終えてきました

  • from four months in the middle of nowhere,

    実のところ

  • mostly grunting and swearing, straight to the TED stage.

    不満と文句ばかりで何もない場所から

  • So you can imagine that's a transition that hasn't been entirely seamless.

    4ヶ月間の探検を終えてすぐ まっすぐここへ運ばれてきたような感覚でいます

  • One of the interesting side effects

    そのため まだ頭の切り替えがうまくいっていません

  • seems to be that my short-term memory is entirely shot.

    探検の不思議な副作用により

  • So I've had to write some notes

    私の短期記憶は完全にダメになったようなのです

  • to avoid too much grunting and swearing in the next 17 minutes.

    だから 不満と文句の17分を回避するために

  • This is the first talk I've given about this expedition,

    メモを用意しました

  • and while we weren't sequencing genomes or building space telescopes,

    この探検の話をするのは初めてです

  • this is a story about giving everything we had to achieve something

    これは 遺伝子の解読や宇宙望遠鏡の建設ではなく

  • that hadn't been done before.

    過去 誰も成し遂げられなかったことをなすために

  • So I hope in that you might find some food for thought.

    我々の全てをささげた話です

  • It was a journey, an expedition in Antarctica,

    少しでもみなさんの考えるヒントになればと思います

  • the coldest, windiest, driest and highest altitude continent on Earth.

    地球上で もっとも寒く 過酷で 乾燥し  標高の高い大陸である

  • It's a fascinating place. It's a huge place.

    南極大陸での探検の旅でした

  • It's twice the size of Australia,

    南極は魅力的で 広大です

  • a continent that is the same size as China and India put together.

    オーストラリアの2倍の大きさで

  • As an aside, I have experienced

    中国とインドを足したほどの大きさです

  • an interesting phenomenon in the last few days,

    話がそれますが

  • something that I expect Chris Hadfield may get at TED in a few years' time,

    この数日 興味深い現象を経験しました

  • conversations that go something like this:

    数年後 TEDでクリス・ハドフィールドが

  • "Oh, Antarctica. Awesome.

    次のようなことを話すことになるのではないかと

  • My husband and I did Antarctica with Lindblad for our anniversary."

    「あぁ 南極 最高だわよ

  • Or, "Oh cool, did you go there for the marathon?"

    夫と私の記念にリンドブラードと南極へ行ったわ」

  • (Laughter)

    とか 「イイね マラソンで南極に行ったんですって?」

  • Our journey was, in fact, 69 marathons back to back

    (笑)

  • in 105 days, an 1,800-mile round trip on foot from the coast of Antarctica

    我々の旅はマラソンの距離で69回分

  • to the South Pole and back again.

    南極の海岸から南極点まで歩き そしてまた戻ってくる

  • In the process, we broke the record

    105日 約3,000キロの旅です

  • for the longest human-powered polar journey in history by more than 400 miles.

    我々はこの過程で 極地での人力移動距離の最長記録を

  • (Applause)

    約640キロ更新しました

  • For those of you from the Bay Area,

    (拍手)

  • it was the same as walking from here to San Francisco,

    西海岸沿いの方のためにご説明すると

  • then turning around and walking back again.

    ここからサンフランシスコまで歩いてから

  • So as camping trips go, it was a long one,

    また歩いて戻ってくるという道のりです

  • and one I've seen summarized most succinctly here

    キャンプ旅行としては 相当に長い道のりでした

  • on the hallowed pages of Business Insider Malaysia.

    マレーシアのビジネスインサイダー紙に

  • ["Two Explorers Just Completed A Polar Expedition That Killed Everyone The Last Time It Was Attempted"]

    よくまとめられた記事が載っているので 紹介しましょう

  • Chris Hadfield talked so eloquently

    [過去 幾多の探検家が亡くなった極地での冒険を 2名は成し遂げた]

  • about fear and about the odds of success, and indeed the odds of survival.

    クリス・ハドフィールドは

  • Of the nine people in history that had attempted this journey before us,

    探検での恐怖、成功、 そして生存の可能性について雄弁に語っています

  • none had made it to the pole and back,

    我々以前に 9名がチャレンジし

  • and five had died in the process.

    1人として極点を往復できず

  • This is Captain Robert Falcon Scott.

    途中で5名が亡くなっています

  • He led the last team to attempt this expedition.

    ロバート・ファルコン・スコット隊長です

  • Scott and his rival Sir Ernest Shackleton,

    この冒険を試みた最後の部隊を率いました

  • over the space of a decade,

    彼とライバルのアーネスト・シャクルトン卿の探検隊は

  • both led expeditions battling to become the first to reach the South Pole,

    南極点に最初に到着し

  • to chart and map the interior of Antarctica,

    南極大陸の測量を行うために

  • a place we knew less about, at the time,

    10年にわたって競い合いました

  • than the surface of the moon,

    その当時 南極大陸は

  • because we could see the moon through telescopes.

    天体望遠鏡で観察できる月面よりも

  • Antarctica was, for the most part, a century ago, uncharted.

    知られていなかったのです

  • Some of you may know the story.

    南極大陸の大部分は 100年前には測量されていませんでした

  • Scott's last expedition, the Terra Nova Expedition in 1910,

    ご存知の方もいらっしゃるでしょう

  • started as a giant siege-style approach.

    スコット隊長の最後の探検 1910年のテラ・ノヴァ号の探検は

  • He had a big team using ponies,

    壮大な極地法で始まりました

  • using dogs, using petrol-driven tractors,

    ポニーや犬

  • dropping multiple, pre-positioned depots of food and fuel

    石油で動くトラクター等を使って

  • through which Scott's final team of five would travel to the Pole,

    南極点に向かうスコット隊の 最後の5名が通る区間に

  • where they would turn around and ski back to the coast again on foot.

    たくさんの食料と燃料を事前に配備して

  • Scott and his final team of five

    その後 5名は南極点で折り返し 徒歩でそりを引いて戻る計画でした

  • arrived at the South Pole in January 1912

    スコットと最後の5名のチームは

  • to find they had been beaten to it by a Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen,

    1912年の1月に南極点に到着しましたが

  • who rode on dogsled.

    犬ぞりを使った ノルウェーのロアルド・アムンゼン隊に

  • Scott's team ended up on foot.

    先を越されたことを知りました

  • And for more than a century this journey has remained unfinished.

    スコット隊は最後は徒歩でした

  • Scott's team of five died on the return journey.

    それから100年以上の間 人力での南極点到達は未達のままでした

  • And for the last decade,

    5名のスコット隊は復路で全滅したからです

  • I've been asking myself why that is.

    過去10年間の間

  • How come this has remained the high-water mark?

    私はその理由を考え続けました

  • Scott's team covered 1,600 miles on foot.

    なぜ スコット隊の記録が その後も塗り替えられないのか?

  • No one's come close to that ever since.

    スコット隊は2,500キロを徒歩で歩きました

  • So this is the high-water mark of human endurance,

    それ以来 誰もその記録に近づけていません

  • human endeavor, human athletic achievement

    だから それが地球上 最も過酷な気候での

  • in arguably the harshest climate on Earth.

    人類の忍耐 努力

  • It was as if the marathon record

    肉体的成果の最高到達点なのです

  • has remained unbroken since 1912.

    これはマラソンの記録が

  • And of course some strange and predictable combination of curiosity,

    1912年以来破られていないようなものです

  • stubbornness, and probably hubris

    好奇心 頑固さ または尊大さなど

  • led me to thinking I might be the man to try to finish the job.

    もちろん 多少突飛ですが ご想像の通りの要素が一緒になり

  • Unlike Scott's expedition, there were just two of us,

    ひょっとして自分がこの偉業を成し遂げる男になれる かもしれないと考えさせました

  • and we set off from the coast of Antarctica in October last year,

    スコットの探検と異なり 我々は二人だけです

  • dragging everything ourselves,

    そして昨年の10月に持ち物を全部引きずって

  • a process Scott called "man-hauling."

    南極の海岸を出発しました

  • When I say it was like walking from here to San Francisco and back,

    スコットが ”人力輸送”と呼んだ方法です

  • I actually mean it was like dragging something that weighs a shade more

    ここからサンフランシスコまで 歩いて往復するといいましたが

  • than the heaviest ever NFL player.

    実際にはNFL史上最も重い選手よりも

  • Our sledges weighed 200 kilos,

    少し重いくらいの荷物を引きずっていました

  • or 440 pounds each at the start,

    我々のそりはスタート時点で

  • the same weights that the weakest of Scott's ponies pulled.

    200キロまたは440ポンドあり

  • Early on, we averaged 0.5 miles per hour.

    スコット隊の最も弱いポニーが 引っ張った重さと同じです

  • Perhaps the reason no one had attempted this journey until now,

    最初は 我々は時速800mでした

  • in more than a century,

    多分 100年以上もの間

  • was that no one had been quite stupid enough to try.

    この旅が行われなかった理由は

  • And while I can't claim we were exploring

    これに挑戦するほど馬鹿な人が いなかったからでしょう

  • in the genuine Edwardian sense of the word

    まさしくエドワード朝時代の方法であったと

  • we weren't naming any mountains or mapping any uncharted valleys

    主張することは出来ませんが-

  • I think we were stepping into uncharted territory in a human sense.

    どの山の名前を名づけることもなく 未測量の谷も地図に記しませんでした

  • Certainly, if in the future we learn there is an area of the human brain

    人類が未だ測量したことのない土地に 足を踏み入れたと思います

  • that lights up when one curses oneself,

    人類の脳に自身を呪う時に点灯する部分を

  • I won't be at all surprised.

    我々が将来知ることがあるとしても

  • You've heard that the average American spends 90 percent of their time indoors.

    きっと驚きはしないでしょう

  • We didn't go indoors for nearly four months.

    一般的なアメリカ人は90%の時間を屋内で過ごします

  • We didn't see a sunset either.

    我々はほぼ4ヶ月屋内に入らなかったのです

  • It was 24-hour daylight.

    日没も見ませんでした

  • Living conditions were quite spartan.

    24時間 昼間です

  • I changed my underwear three times in 105 days

    生活環境はとても苛酷です

  • and Tarka and I shared 30 square feet on the canvas.

    105日間 下着は3回しか替えませんでした

  • Though we did have some technology that Scott could never have imagined.

    タルカと私は2.7㎡のテントを共有しました

  • And we blogged live every evening from the tent via a laptop

    スコットが夢想だにしなかった いくつかのテクノロジーもありました

  • and a custom-made satellite transmitter,

    毎晩テントから 太陽光発電の

  • all of which were solar-powered:

    特注の衛星通信機器とパソコンで

  • we had a flexible photovoltaic panel over the tent.

    ブログを書いていました

  • And the writing was important to me.

    テントの上には折り曲げ可能な 太陽電池パネルがありました

  • As a kid, I was inspired by the literature of adventure and exploration,

    私にとって書くことはとても重要でした

  • and I think we've all seen here this week

    子供の頃 冒険や探検文学に影響されましたが

  • the importance and the power of storytelling.

    皆さんも今週ここで

  • So we had some 21st-century gear,

    物語を話すことの大切さと力を知ったでしょう

  • but the reality is that the challenges that Scott faced

    21世紀の装置を使っていましたが

  • were the same that we faced:

    我々が実際に体験した現実は

  • those of the weather and of what Scott called glide,

    スコットが直面した困難と同じものでした

  • the amount of friction between the sledges and the snow.

    天候であり スコットがグライドと呼んだ

  • The lowest wind chill we experienced was in the -70s,

    そりと雪の間の大量の摩擦抵抗でした

  • and we had zero visibility, what's called white-out,

    経験した暴風雪の最低温度はマイナス70度

  • for much of our journey.

    旅のほとんどは ホワイトアウトと呼ばれる

  • We traveled up and down one of the largest

    視界ゼロの状態でした

  • and most dangerous glaciers in the world, the Beardmore glacier.

    世界で最も大きく危険な氷河の一つである

  • It's 110 miles long; most of its surface is what's called blue ice.

    ベアドモア氷河を上り下りしました

  • You can see it's a beautiful, shimmering steel-hard blue surface

    全長180キロで 表面のほとんどは ブルーアイスと呼ばれるものです

  • covered with thousands and thousands of crevasses,

    きれいでキラキラ光る 鉄のように固い青い表面が

  • these deep cracks in the glacial ice up to 200 feet deep.

    最深60メートルにもなる 氷河の深い亀裂

  • Planes can't land here,

    何千ものクレバスが覆っています

  • so we were at the most risk,

    飛行機は着陸できません

  • technically, when we had the slimmest chance of being rescued.

    そのため 実質的に救助される可能性が最も低く

  • We got to the South Pole after 61 days on foot,

    最大の危険にさらされます

  • with one day off for bad weather,

    我々は悪天候のため 1日遅れの

  • and I'm sad to say, it was something of an anticlimax.

    61日目に徒歩で南極点に到着しましたが

  • There's a permanent American base,

    残念なことに ここは期待はずれでした

  • the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station at the South Pole.

    南極点には アメリカの常設基地である

  • They have an airstrip, they have a canteen,

    アムンゼン・スコット基地があります

  • they have hot showers,

    滑走路があり 食堂があり

  • they have a post office, a tourist shop,

    温水シャワーもあります

  • a basketball court that doubles as a movie theater.

    郵便局や土産物屋

  • So it's a bit different these days,

    映画館としても使われている バスケットボールコートもあります

  • and there are also acres of junk.

    最近はちょっと違うのです

  • I think it's a marvelous thing

    そして 多くのごみが捨てられています

  • that humans can exist 365 days of the year

    人類が年間365日

  • with hamburgers and hot showers and movie theaters,

    ハンバーガーと温水シャワーと映画館のある

  • but it does seem to produce a lot of empty cardboard boxes.

    生活が出来るのは素晴らしいと思いますが

  • You can see on the left of this photograph,

    同時に多くの空の段ボール箱が 生み出されているように見えます

  • several square acres of junk

    この写真の左側には

  • waiting to be flown out from the South Pole.

    南極から飛行機での搬出を待っている

  • But there is also a pole at the South Pole,

    何エーカーものごみの山が見えます

  • and we got there on foot, unassisted,

    しかし 南極点には

  • unsupported, by the hardest route,

    我々が 誰の力も借りずに

  • 900 miles in record time,

    最も険しいルートを助けもなく

  • dragging more weight than anyone in history.

    1,500キロを 史上最速で

  • And if we'd stopped there and flown home,

    歴史上の誰よりも重い荷物を引きずり 踏破したという記念碑があります

  • which would have been the eminently sensible thing to do,

    もし我々が中断して飛行機で家に帰ったら

  • then my talk would end here

    もちろんそれは極めて常識的な判断ですが

  • and it would end something like this.

    私の話はここで終わり

  • If you have the right team around you, the right tools, the right technology,

    結末はこういったものになるでしょう

  • and if you have enough self-belief and enough determination,

    正しいチームが周りにいて 正しい道具と テクノロジーがあり

  • then anything is possible.

    十分な自信と決意があるのなら

  • But then we turned around,

    不可能はありません

  • and this is where things get interesting.

    しかしもし引き返したら

  • High on the Antarctic plateau,

    物語は面白くなります

  • over 10,000 feet, it's very windy, very cold, very dry, we were exhausted.

    3000メートルを超える南極の高地は

  • We'd covered 35 marathons,

    風が強く とても寒い場所で 我々は疲弊していました

  • we were only halfway,

    35回分のマラソンをし

  • and we had a safety net, of course,

    まだ道半ばです

  • of ski planes and satellite phones

    スコットの時代にはなかった 雪上飛行機や携帯電話

  • and live, 24-hour tracking beacons that didn't exist for Scott,

    セーフティネットも当然ありました

  • but in hindsight,

    しかし 後から分かることですが

  • rather than making our lives easier,

    安全装置は

  • the safety net actually allowed us

    人生を簡単にすることよりも

  • to cut things very fine indeed,

    人類の限界に限りなく 近いところに踏み出すための

  • to sail very close to our absolute limits as human beings.

    微妙な判断を可能にするのです

  • And it is an exquisite form of torture

    人類の限界への旅は 激しい拷問で

  • to exhaust yourself to the point of starvation day after day

    毎日食糧一杯のそりを曳いていながら

  • while dragging a sledge full of food.

    毎日飢えにより疲弊していきます

  • For years, I'd been writing glib lines in sponsorship proposals

    何年もの間 支援者への提案の中で

  • about pushing the limits of human endurance,

    人類の忍耐の限界への挑戦などと 軽薄な文章を書いてきましたが

  • but in reality, that was a very frightening place to be indeed.

    実際には とても怖い環境でした

  • We had, before we'd got to the Pole,

    南極点に到着する前は

  • two weeks of almost permanent headwind, which slowed us down.

    二週間のほとんど止むことのない逆風が 我々の歩みを遅らせました

  • As a result, we'd had several days of eating half rations.

    その結果 何日かの間 半分の量しか食べられませんでした

  • We had a finite amount of food in the sledges to make this journey,

    旅のためにそりに積まれた食糧は 限られていたので

  • so we were trying to string that out

    摂取カロリーを必要量の半分にすることで

  • by reducing our intake to half the calories we should have been eating.

    食糧を長持ちさせようとしたのです

  • As a result, we both became increasingly hypoglycemic

    その結果 二人は徐々に低血糖になり-

  • we had low blood sugar levels day after day

    血糖値が日に日に下がっていき-

  • and increasingly susceptible to the extreme cold.

    極寒に敏感になっていきました

  • Tarka took this photo of me one evening

    タルカはある日

  • after I'd nearly passed out with hypothermia.

    低体温で気絶しそうな私の写真をとりました

  • We both had repeated bouts of hypothermia, something I hadn't experienced before,

    二人とも何度も低体温症の発作に襲われました かつて経験したこともなく

  • and it was very humbling indeed.

    とても屈辱的です

  • As much as you might like to think, as I do,

    私がそうであったように

  • that you're the kind of person who doesn't quit,

    自分はくじけない人間だと思うほど

  • that you'll go down swinging,

    そのダメージは大きくなります

  • hypothermia doesn't leave you much choice.

    低体温症は選択肢を与えてくれません

  • You become utterly incapacitated.

    完全に無力になります

  • It's like being a drunk toddler.

    よっぱらった幼児のようです

  • You become pathetic.

    惨めな姿になります

  • I remember just wanting to lie down and quit.

    ただ寝て止めたいと願ったのを覚えています

  • It was a peculiar, peculiar feeling,

    とても とても奇妙な感覚です

  • and a real surprise to me to be debilitated to that degree.

    そこまで衰弱するのは本当に驚きでした

  • And then we ran out of food completely,

    ついに食糧は底をつきました

  • 46 miles short of the first of the depots

    我々が旅を始めた

  • that we'd laid on our outward journey.

    最初の補給所から46マイル手前です

  • We'd laid 10 depots of food,

    我々は復路のために文字通り食糧と燃料を埋めた

  • literally burying food and fuel, for our return journey

    10ヶ所の食糧補給所を用意していました

  • the fuel was for a cooker so you could melt snow to get water

    燃料は雪を溶かし水を作る 調理器具用です

  • and I was forced to make the decision to call for a resupply flight,

    私は補給機を呼ぶかの選択を迫られました

  • a ski plane carrying eight days of food to tide us over that gap.

    雪上飛行機はこの区間を乗り越える 8日分の食糧を運んでくれます

  • They took 12 hours to reach us from the other side of Antarctica.

    南極の反対側から12時間かかりました

  • Calling for that plane was one of the toughest decisions of my life.

    飛行機を呼ぶのは私の人生で 最もつらい決断の一つでした

  • And I sound like a bit of a fraud standing here now with a sort of belly.

    だからこんな腹をしてここに立っているのは 詐欺のように聞こえます

  • I've put on 30 pounds in the last three weeks.

    この3週間で私は15キロ太りました

  • Being that hungry has left an interesting mental scar,

    あまりの空腹は面白い心の傷を残しました

  • which is that I've been hoovering up every hotel buffet that I can find.

    ホテルのビュッフェを見つけるたびに 食べあさってしまうのです

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But we were genuinely quite hungry, and in quite a bad way.

    実際 我々は極めて悪い意味で 本当に空腹でした

  • I don't regret calling for that plane for a second,

    ここに生きて立って

  • because I'm still standing here alive,

    無傷で この話ができるのですから

  • with all digits intact, telling this story.

    補給機を呼んだことに微塵も後悔はありません

  • But getting external assistance like that was never part of the plan,

    しかし 外部の助けを呼ぶことは 計画に全くなかったので

  • and it's something my ego is still struggling with.

    自分の心の中はいまだに葛藤しています

  • This was the biggest dream I've ever had,

    この旅は 私の最大の夢であり

  • and it was so nearly perfect.

    ほとんど完璧でした

  • On the way back down to the coast,

    海岸線に戻る道のり

  • our cramponsthey're the spikes on our boots

    ベアドモア氷河の頂上で

  • that we have for traveling over this blue ice on the glacier

    我々のクランポン -

  • broke on the top of the Beardmore.

    氷河のブルーアイスの上を旅するための ブーツのスパイクが壊れました

  • We still had 100 miles to go downhill

    滑りやすい岩のように固い ブルーアイスの下り坂が

  • on very slippery rock-hard blue ice.

    160キロも残っていました

  • They needed repairing almost every hour.

    ほぼ毎時 クランポンを直す必要がありました

  • To give you an idea of scale,

    規模のイメージをお伝えするため