Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Thank you.

  • Today I want to talk about 3 stages of generosity

  • that I have learned along the way.

  • The first is the obvious one which is "to give."

  • Repeated research shows that we are predisposed to altruism.

  • This is not a new thing.

  • And all of us probably don't need research,

  • we all have had our moments.

  • True story, in Mexico, on Christmas Day,

  • a father and a son are sitting by the tree.

  • And there's a kid from the slums walking past them.

  • Father turns to his son and says, "Son, give him one of your toys."

  • The son is reluctant, naturally,

  • but when he sees his father is pretty serious,

  • he picks up one of his toys,

  • and he picks up the least favourite toy.

  • And he's about to go up there

  • and his dad says, "Son, give him your favorite toy."

  • And the son goes up and initially, of course, he is reluctant,

  • but he actually goes out and does it.

  • When he comes back, the father thinks he needs to appreciate

  • and acknowledge what his son has done.

  • It was a big sacrifice.

  • But much to his surprise, this kid comes back with joy.

  • He looks at his dad, looks up and he says,

  • "Dad, that was amazing. Can I do it again?"

  • And we've all had these moments.

  • Some of us are late bloomers.

  • I was in my early twenties when a few of us got together and said,

  • "We just want to give with no strings attached. What can we do?"

  • In Silicon Valley, we went to the homeless shelter

  • and we ended up building up a website.

  • It felt great, we told our friends, we came back,

  • and it became the organizing principle

  • for this organization called CharityFocus.

  • Along the way we re-learned one very interesting insight,

  • and that was this: compassion is contagious.

  • When you start organizations, you say,

  • "I want to grow this tree," and you focus on it,

  • but with compassion it doesn't work that way.

  • You actually have to nurture the whole eco-system.

  • So on one side, we were doing technology work,

  • but on the other side, on the weekends,

  • we would go out and share meals with the homeless

  • and learn about their perspective on life.

  • On Wednesdays we'd get together in people's living rooms and meditate,

  • see what that is all about.

  • We would go out and do acts of kindness, this is the smile card.

  • It tells you to go out and do something small for someone else.

  • And you do it anonymously, so the person who received it says,

  • "Who do I thank?"

  • Well, you can't pay back, but you can pay it forward.

  • It serves as a reminder to do that.

  • It's very beautiful.

  • So we've realized that compassion is very contagious.

  • Along the way --

  • The second stage of generosity was "to receive."

  • This is Arthur, he loves to give hugs.

  • Anyone who's given a hug, which is all of us,

  • knows that you can't give a hug without receiving one.

  • And that's obvious, but where we get caught up

  • is that so many times when we give, we expect to receive in the same way.

  • And that expectation blinds us to new forms of value.

  • Now, in CharityFocus, we have three organizing principles.

  • One of them was that we don't fundraise.

  • We did this partially just to stay humble

  • and to be real, we start with what we have.

  • If we have a lot, great, if we don't have a lot, great,

  • we can still serve.

  • That was our organizing principle and we never thought we'd have abundance,

  • but lo and behold, we actually started discovering abundance.

  • We say what was happening?

  • The first kind of abundance we discovered

  • was social capital, that's "Simpson's-ville."

  • Lots and lots of people, right?

  • And partially this is because of the Internet.

  • It made organizing very easy.

  • The transaction cost went down

  • and you saw all kinds of movements without a center.

  • Now, social capital, we have a lots of it.

  • Every time we do an event,

  • there were hundreds of people that we'd interact with offline,

  • there were tens of thousands of people online, they're all mixing together,

  • creating lots of ripples.

  • This was great.

  • Then we went to the second stage, which was Synergistic Capital.

  • The Internet allows you to do loose ties,

  • but what about the deep ties, when you really know somebody,

  • you can look them in the eyes and share something deep and profound.

  • When you can start to create those deep ties, it increases the trust,

  • and when trust is increased, productivity goes up

  • and all this good stuff happens,

  • but most interestingly, synergy starts to happen.

  • Synergy is where one plus one is no longer two.

  • It's much more than two, it's a whole different realm of value.

  • We started discovering that.

  • And the last thing was the "Subtle Capital."

  • I am not sure how else to describe it,

  • but when you give, there's some inner transformation.

  • That inner transformation creates a stillness in your mind

  • and that stillness is an unbelievable asset.

  • When you have a posse of people committed to cultivating that stillness,

  • it really builds new kinds of value

  • that is unexpected and awesome and amazing.

  • That was discovering an abundance.

  • Now, the third stage, which is dance.

  • No, I'm not gonna dance. Or maybe I will.

  • (Laughter)

  • When you give and receive, there's a tendency to keep track.

  • Even though we might not do it overtly, subconsciously we're thinking,

  • "OK, how much did I give, how much did I receive."

  • We do this mathematics. But when you let go of that,

  • you start to dance, it becomes very dynamic.

  • You see a bunch of dancers over there,

  • there're giving each other a shoulder rub.

  • But what you notice is that no one is doing a quid pro quo transaction.

  • Everyone is doing a massage for somebody in front of them,

  • and yet everyone is taken care of.

  • When you start dancing to the spirit of not keeping track --

  • That guy could say,

  • "Oh, the person behind me is giving me 15 joules of pressure on my back,

  • so I'm going to give only 12 joules."

  • If you do that, it doesn't work.

  • But when you let that go, all of a sudden you can have the circle

  • which works in a very different way.

  • So, it works for shoulder rubs, but what about something practical?

  • So, we decided to try a little experiment.

  • We called it "Karma Kitchen."

  • On Sundays, we take over a restaurant.

  • You walk into this restaurant, it's like a regular restaurant,

  • but it's run by volunteers and at the end of your meal

  • your check reads zero.

  • It's zero because someone before you paid for your meal.

  • And you get to pay forward for somebody after you.

  • And people are always confused.

  • "Does that mean it's a free meal?" No, it's not a free meal.

  • When you go to a soup kitchen, who is paying?

  • Someone else outside who's got some other reason for making that happen.

  • Here, it's literally the person in front of you,

  • the person who was here the week before

  • that pays for this week. This week's is for the next week.

  • And when you count on people like that to be generous,

  • how long will that chain last?

  • It has been going for three years.

  • And then it started in D.C.

  • From the surplus there, it started in Chicago.

  • But what's most amazing about this

  • is that it creates a context for a very different kind of value.

  • So for example, there was a UC Berkeley PhD in computer science guy

  • that came over and said, "I want to volunteer."

  • So one Sunday, he is volunteering.

  • He is serving a table, and the guest at the table says,

  • "Oh so, how does this work? You trust me to pay what I want?"

  • He says, "Yeah, it's this chain, and you're part of this chain."

  • Really we are all part of this chain,

  • from our ancestor onwards.

  • So he says, "OK," he takes out his wallet, gives him a hundred, and says,

  • "OK, well, I trust you to bring me back whatever change you want."

  • (Laughter)

  • And this guy goes in the back and he's scratching his head.

  • "This wasn't part of the volunteer orientation!"

  • (Laughter)

  • What are you gonna do?

  • So, he is thinking about it.

  • And then, he decides to tap into that space in himself about what this is.

  • This was not taught, but he taps into that space,

  • he goes up to the guy, gives him back his hundred,

  • takes out a twenty from his wallet, adds to it,

  • and this guy is completely blown away.

  • (Laughter)

  • Because he's blown away,

  • this guy is blown away and you know how this stuff ripples out.

  • Everybody is energized.

  • And you can look at that transaction and say,

  • "There was a cost of food, there was twenty bucks."

  • But the value generated there --

  • I can guaranteed you that that guy went home

  • and he has been telling that story to everybody he encounters.

  • Because this is like, "Which restaurant? Where does this happen?

  • Which place on Earth? Give me the address."

  • So it's the kind of thing where there's a new dimension of value.

  • And if we don't have context where people can practice this,

  • we lose this entirely.

  • So, really I just want to conclude by saying,

  • you Give, Receive and Dance.

  • When you give, you find that compassion is contagious

  • and you start to create a community.

  • When you receive, and really learn to receive,

  • you start to discover abundance.

  • And when you dance, not only do you create micro-gift economies,

  • but we start to seed a gift culture.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

Thank you.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

TEDx】Pay it Foward.ニプン・メータ@TEDxGoldenGateED (【TEDx】Pay it Foward: Nipun Mehta @ TEDxGoldenGateED)

  • 2005 87
    陳冠宇 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語