Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • It's 4 a.m., and the big test is in 8 hours, followed by a piano recital.

    午前4時。大きなテストが8時間後にある。ピアノの発表会の後に。

  • You've been studying and playing for days, but you still don't feel ready for either.

    何日も勉強してピアノの練習をしてきたが、どちらの準備もできたとは思えない。

  • So, what can you do?

    さぁ、何ができるだろうか?

  • Well, you can drink another cup of coffee and spend the next few hours cramming and practicing, but believe it or not,

    コーヒーをもう1杯飲んだり、これから数時間を詰め込んだり、練習したりする時間にする。しかし、信じようと信じまいと、本を閉じて、音楽を聴くのをやめたほうが良いかもしれない。そして眠りにつく。

  • you might be better off closing the books, putting away the music, and going to sleep.

    睡眠は私たちの人生のおよそ3分の1を占める。しかし、私たちの多くが驚くほど睡眠に対して注意を向けず気にしない。

  • Sleep occupies nearly a third of our lives, but many of us give surprisingly little attention and care to it.

    この無関心は主に勘違いの結果である。

  • This neglect is often the result of a major misunderstanding.

    睡眠は時間を失う、あるいは重要な作業が完成した際に休息する方法の1つでしかないわけではない。

  • Sleep isn't lost time, or just a way to rest when all our important work is done.

    かわりに、必要不可欠な機能で、その間に、体は必須のシステムのバランスを取り、抑制する。そして呼吸に影響し、循環から成長、免疫反応まで全てを管理する。

  • Instead, it's a critical function, during which your body balances and regulates its vital systems,

    それは素晴らしいことだが、それら全てはこの試験の後に心配したいでしょう?

  • effecting respiration and regulating everything from circulation to growth and immune response.

    そんなに急がないで。

  • That's great, but you can worry about all those things after this test, right?

    睡眠は脳にとっても必要不可欠なものだとわかった。体の循環血流の5分の1がうとうとしているときに脳に流れるようになっている。

  • Well, not so fast.

    そして寝ている間に脳の中で何が起こっているかは再建が非常に活発に行われている期間である。

  • It turns out that sleep is also crucial for your brain, with a fifth of your body's circulatory blood being channeled to it as you drift off.

    私たちの記憶がどのように作用するかにとって必要なことだ。

  • And what goes on in your brain while you sleep is an intensely active period of restructuring that's crucial for how our memory works.

    一見したところ、物事を記憶する能力は全く感動的ではない。

  • At first glance, our ability to remember things doesn't seem very impressive at all.

    19世紀の心理学者であるヘルマン・エビングハウスは、新しく覚えたことの40%を20分間で忘れるものだと公表した。忘却曲線と呼ばれる現象だ。

  • 19th-century psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus demonstrated that we normally forget 40% of new material within the first 20 minutes, a phenomenon known as the forgetting curve.

    しかし忘れることは、記憶の固定によって予防することができる。それは、情報をはかない短期記憶から長持ちする長期記憶へと動かす過程である。

  • But this loss can be prevented through memory consolidation, the process by which information is moved from our fleeting short-term memory to our more durable long-term memory.

    この固定は脳の主要な部分の助けをかりて起こる。海馬として知られるものだ。

  • This consolidation occurs with the help of a major part of the brain known as the hippocampus.

    長期記憶の形での役割は1950年代にH.M.として知られる患者を使ったブレンダ・ミルナーの研究が発表された。

  • Its role in long-term memory formation was demonstrated in the 1950s by Brenda Milner in her research with a patient known as H.M.

    彼の海馬が取り除かれた後、新しい短期記憶を作るH.M.の能力は損傷された。しかし反復によって身体的な作業を学ぶことは可能だった。

  • After having his hippocampus removed, H.M.'s ability to form new short-term memories was damaged, but he was able to learn physical tasks through repetition.

    彼の海馬が取り除かれることによって、長期記憶を作るH.M.の能力も損傷された。

  • Due to the removal of his hippocampus, H.M.'s ability to form long-term memories was also damaged.

    このケースで明らかになったことは、他の何よりも、海馬が特に長期的な宣言記憶の固定に関わっていることだった。

  • What this case revealed, among other things, was that the hippocampus was specifically involved in the consolidation of long-term declarative memory,

    テストのために覚える必要がある事実や概念のようなものだ。手続き記憶よりも。例えば、演奏会のために習得する必要のある指の動きのように。

  • such as the facts and concepts you need to remember for that test, rather than procedural memory, such as the finger movements you need to master for that recital.

    90年代のエリック・カンデルによる研究とミルナーの発見はこの固定の過程がどのように作用するのか現在のモデルを与えた。

  • Milner's findings, along with work by Eric Kandel in the 90's, have given us our current model of how this consolidation process works.

    感覚データが最初に書き換えられてニューロンに短期記憶として一時的に保存される。

  • Sensory data is initially transcribed and temporarily recorded in the neurons as short-term memory.

    そこから、海馬へと旅をする。そこで皮質の部分でニューロンが強化され高められる。

  • From there, it travels to the hippocampus, which strengthens and enhances the neurons in that cortical area.

    神経可塑性の現象のおかげで、新しいシナプシスの芽が形作られ、ニューロン間の新しいつながりを可能にする。そして神経回路網を強くする。そこで情報は長期記憶として戻ってくる。

  • Thanks to the phenomenon of neuroplasticity, new synaptic buds are formed, allowing new connections between neurons, and strengthening the neural network where the information will be returned as long-term memory.

    私たちはどうして覚えていることと、覚えていないことがあるのだろうか?

  • So why do we remember some things and not others?

    記憶の保持効果に影響するいくつかの手段がある。

  • Well, there are a few ways to influence the extent and effectiveness of memory retention.

    例えば、感情が高まった時に形作られた記憶やストレス時の記憶は、海馬と感情のつながりから記憶に残りやすい。

  • For example, memories that are formed in times of heightened feeling, or even stress, will be better recorded due to the hippocampus's link with emotion.

    しかし記憶の湖底に貢献している需要な要因の1つは分かるだろうか?良質な睡眠だ。

  • But one of the major factors contributing to memory consolidation is... you guessed it, a good night's sleep.

    睡眠は4つの段階から構成されている。最も深いものが徐波睡眠と急速な眼球運動として知られているものだ。

  • Sleep is composed of four stages, the deepest of which are known as slow-wave sleep and rapid eye movement.

    これらの段階の間で、EEG機械を使って人を管理すると電機的刺激が脳波、海馬、視床、そして大脳皮質の間を動いていることが分かる。記憶の形成のリレーをする場所として作用する。

  • EEG machines monitoring people during these stages have shown electrical impulses moving between the brainstem, hippocampus, thalamus, and cortex, which serve as relay stations of memory formation.

    そして睡眠の異なる段階は異なる記憶の種類の固定を助けることを示している。

  • And the different stages of sleep have been shown to help consolidate different types of memories.

    ノンレムの徐波睡眠の間に、宣言記憶が海馬の前方で一時保存に暗号化される。

  • During the non-REM slow-wave sleep, declarative memory is encoded into a temporary store in the anterior part of the hippocampus.

    大脳皮質と海馬の間の継続した対話を通じて、繰り返し活性化され徐々に皮質の長期記憶へと配布されていく。

  • Through a continuing dialogue between the cortex and hippocampus, it is then repeatedly reactivated, driving its gradual redistribution to long-term storage in the cortex.

    一方、レム睡眠は脳を活発に起こすのと同じように手続き記憶の固定に関連している。

  • REM sleep, on the other hand, with its similarity to waking brain activity, is associated with the consolidation of procedural memory.

    研究を元に、公式を暗記した3時間後に眠ってスケールを練習した1時間後が最も理想的である。

  • So based on the studies, going to sleep three hours after memorizing your formulas and one hour after practicing your scales would be the most ideal.

    だから睡眠を取ることは長期的な健康を害するだけでなく、それ以上に前の晩に詰め込んだ知識や練習の全てが段階の知恵を確認する「寝かせる」だけになってしまうだろう。

  • So hopefully you can see now that skimping on sleep not only harms your long-term health, but actually makes it less likely that you'll retain all that knowledge and practice from the previous night,

    内部の再建や寝ている間に起こる新しいつながりの形成について考えると、適切な睡眠によって毎朝、新しく進歩した脳と共に目覚め、目の前にあるチャレンジに直面する準備ができるだろう。

  • all of which just goes to affirm the wisdom of the phrase, "Sleep on it."

    彼の海馬が取り除かれた後、

  • When you think about all the internal restructuring and forming of new connections that occurs while you slumber,

    新しい短期記憶を作るH.M.の能力は損傷された。

  • you could even say that proper sleep will have you waking up every morning with a new and improved brain, ready to face the challenges ahead.

    しかし反復によって身体的な作業を学ぶことは可能だった。

It's 4 a.m., and the big test is in 8 hours, followed by a piano recital.

午前4時。大きなテストが8時間後にある。ピアノの発表会の後に。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

B1 中級 日本語 記憶 海馬 睡眠 皮質 固定 ニューロン

【TED-Ed】良質な夜の睡眠による恩恵(The benefits of a good night's sleep - Shai Marcu)

  • 187574 7128
    稲葉白兎   に公開 2019 年 04 月 04 日
動画の中の単語

前のバージョンに戻す