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  • All right, more bottles of Champagne are popped

  • during the holiday season than at

  • any other time of the year.

  • French law states that grapes

  • from the region of Champagne must

  • be used for a bottle of sparkling

  • wine to be called champagne.

  • But from a chemical perspective,

  • champagne obeys another law: Henry’s law.

  • This law says that the pressure

  • of a gas above a solution is

  • proportional to the concentration

  • of the gas in the solution.

  • Carbon dioxide gas is at the heart of

  • Champagne’s famous bubbly character.

  • In an unopened bottle of champagne,

  • carbon dioxide dissolved in the wine

  • is in balanceor equilibriumwith

  • gas in the space between

  • the cork and the liquid.

  • Uncorking releases the gas

  • and throws off the equilibrium.

  • According to Henry's law,

  • the dissolved carbon dioxide

  • leaves the champagne via bubbles,

  • which reestablishes the equilibrium.

  • Champagne makes its gas naturally during fermentation.

  • During this process, yeast gobble up

  • sugar molecules called glucose

  • and fructose in grape juice,

  • converting them into carbon

  • dioxide and ethanolthe type of

  • alcohol found in alcoholic beverages.

  • Unlike other wines, champagne undergoes

  • a second fermented in the bottle to

  • trap carbon dioxide gas, which dissolves

  • into the wine and forms bubbles.

  • Legend tells us that a French monk

  • named Dom Pierrerignon discovered

  • champagne in the mid-1600s.

  • In Perignon’s era, winemakers had a

  • tough time with that second fermentation.

  • Some bottles wound up with no bubbles at all.

  • Others got too much carbon dioxide,

  • and exploded under the enormous pressure.

  • And well, no one wants that.

  • More than 600 different chemical compounds

  • join carbon dioxide in champagne, each

  • lending its own unique quality to the

  • aroma and flavor of a glass of bubbly.

  • But even with all that flavor,

  • champagne would be just another

  • white wine without those tiny bubbles.

  • As the bubbles ascend the length of

  • a glass in tiny trains, they drag along

  • molecules of flavor and aroma,

  • which explode out of the surface,

  • tickling the nose and stimulating the senses.

  • The bubbly surface of champagne

  • is also a feast for the eyes,

  • especially under a microscope.

  • When an exploding bubble deforms its neighbors,

  • gorgeousflower-shapedstructures

  • blossom and disappear in the blink of an eye.

  • So what’s the best way to pour a glass of

  • bubbly and maximize the sensory experience?

  • A study published in the American

  • Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural

  • and Food Chemistry answered that question:

  • Pouring champagne on an angle preserves up to

  • twice the carbon dioxide bubbles when compared

  • to pouring down the middle of the glass.

  • So pop some bottles of bubbly and enjoy

  • what’s left of the rest of the year.

  • As youre drinking be sure to check out

  • some of our other videos such as

  • How Breathalyzers Work or Sexy Chemistry.

  • While youre at it,

  • bring in the New Year’s

  • with hitting that subscribe button.

  • Happy Holiday’s from us here at Reactions!

All right, more bottles of Champagne are popped

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シャンパンの化学 - 反応 (The Chemistry of Champagne - Reactions)

  • 348 22
    Johnny Tsai に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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