Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hello, my name is Magnus Walker and I was born in 1967, in Sheffield, England.

    こんにちは、私の名前はマグナス・ウォーカーです。1967年にイギリスのシェフィールドで生まれました。

  • I left school at 15 and I came to America at the age of 19.

    15歳で退学し、19歳で渡米しました。

  • Well, eight weeks ago I didn’t know what a TED talk was,

    8週間前はTEDトークの意味を知らなかった

  • and to be honest, I don’t know why I’m here today.

    と、正直なところ、今日は何のために来たのかわからない。

  • But I do appreciate the opportunity to be with you guys

    しかし、私はあなた方と一緒にいる機会に感謝しています。

  • and share my story, my journey, my hopes and my dreams.

    そして、私の物語、私の旅、私の希望、私の夢を共有します。

  • And I, having left school at 15, you know, for me I didn’t really have any future.

    15歳で学校を辞めた私には将来がなかったんです

  • Well, I came to America 28 years ago

    えーと、28年前にアメリカに来ました。

  • and that represented the land for opportunity for me.

    そして、それは私にとってのチャンスの土地を表していました。

  • And in those past 28 years I’ve been able to build 3 things,

    そして、この28年間で私は3つのものを作ることができました。

  • a successful clothing company,

    売れっ子の洋服屋さん。

  • a film location business,

    映画のロケ地ビジネス。

  • and also a restored raced driven and collected quite a lot of classic Porches.

    また、復元されたレースで駆動し、かなり多くの古典的なポーチを収集しました。

  • A Porsche is a passion for me

    ポルシェに夢中になる

  • and I’ll talk about that in detail in a little bit.

    で、それについては少し詳しくお話します。

  • But all 3 of those things share one common bond,

    しかし、この3つには共通の絆があります。

  • I had no education in them and I didn’t really think I would end up in that particular field.

    私は彼らの中では何の教育も受けていなかったし、まさか自分がその特定の分野で終わるとは思っていませんでした。

  • I didn’t really know where I was going.

    本当にどこに行くのかわからなかった。

  • But all three of those things have a common thread, a common bond.

    しかし、この3つには共通の糸、共通の絆があります。

  • And that common bond for me really is freedom.

    そして、私にとっての共通の絆は、本当に自由なのです。

  • Freedom to do whatever I wanted to do

    やりたいことを何でもできる自由

  • and dream sort of to be able to,

    と夢のようなことができるようになりました。

  • I suppose, uh, live my life to the fullest and do whatever I wanted to do.

    自分の人生を精一杯生きて、やりたいことをやりたいようにやっていたと思います。

  • So, coming out to America really was a journey, and I’ll start my journey in 1977.

    だから、アメリカにカミングアウトすることは本当に旅だったし、1977年から旅に出ることになる。

  • 1977 in England was sort of a special year.

    1977年のイギリスは特別な年でした。

  • We had this, uh, punk rock thing going on

    俺たちはパンク・ロックをやっていた

  • and we also had this Royal Jubilee thing going on.

    王室御用達の事もあったし

  • But for me, it was the start of a very memorable moment.

    でも、私にとっては、とても印象に残る出来事の始まりでした。

  • My father took me to the London Earls Court Motor Show in 1977.

    1977年に父に連れられてロンドンのアールズコートモーターショーに行ってきました。

  • And back then I fell in love with this car, it was a white Martini Porsche.

    そしてその頃、私はこの車に惚れ込んだんです、白いマルティーニポルシェでした。

  • Now, any kid growing up anywhere in the world in the late 70s early 80s,

    70年代後半から80年代前半に世界中のどこかで育った子供たちが

  • chances are you probably had a choice of 3 cars on your wall:

    壁に3台の車を 選んだ可能性がある

  • Porsche Turbo, Ferrari Boxer, or Lamborghini Countach.

    ポルシェ・ターボ、フェラーリ・ボクサー、ランボルギーニ・カウンタック。

  • For some reason I chose Porsche,

    なぜかポルシェを選んでしまいました。

  • I even wrote a letter to Porsche when I was 10 years old.

    10歳の時にポルシェに手紙を書いたこともあります。

  • And essentially said to them, hey, I want to design for Porsche,

    ポルシェのためにデザインをしたいと言ったんです。

  • And they wrote back to me and said, well call us when youre a little bit older,

    手紙が来て、「もう少し大きくなったら連絡してくれ」と言われた。

  • which I thought was pretty funny and they sent me a sales brochure

    面白いと思っていたら、セールスパンフレットが送られてきました。

  • and 35 years later they’d end up writing me a letter back,

    35年後には手紙を書き返されていました

  • but I’ll get to that story a little later on.

    が、その話は少し後にします。

  • So I’m this young kid growing up in Sheffield.

    私はシェフィールドで育った若者です。

  • Sheffield was a grim northern steel town as shown by this picture right here.

    シェフィールドは、この写真のように、北の鉄鋼の町だった。

  • You know, there wasn’t necessarily many Porsches on the road,

    道路にポルシェがたくさん走っていたわけではありませんでしたが

  • So I filed that dream away, I had the poster on the wall,

    だからその夢をファイルして 壁にポスターを貼ってたの

  • and I was watching Motorsports as a kid also in 1977.

    と、1977年にも子供の頃にモータースポーツを見ていました。

  • England had the James Hunt, he was a Formula 1 world champion.

    イングランドにはジェームズ・ハントがいたが、彼はF1世界チャンピオンだった。

  • And we also had Barry Sheene, he was a two wheel motor GP champion back then.

    バリー・シーンもいました、彼は当時2輪GPのチャンピオンでした。

  • So even though I didn’t grow up with any sort of fancy cars,

    だから、派手な車に乗って育ったわけでもないのに。

  • my father was a salesman, I grew up in a working class background.

    父は営業マンで、私は労働者階級で育ちました。

  • I did have this dream early on, and somehow this dream involved Porsche.

    私は早くからこの夢を見ていたのですが、なぜかこの夢にはポルシェが関係していました。

  • I also, back then, was a pretty competitive middle distance cross-country runner,

    私も当時は中距離のクロスカントリーにかなり強いランナーでした。

  • sort of a solo sport guy, and I used to love getting out there and running.

    一人でスポーツをしていて、外に出て走るのが好きだった。

  • I became quite competitive. I joined this club called the Ellen Show Harriers.

    私はかなりの競争心を持つようになりました。エレン・ショー・ハリアーズというクラブに入ったんです。

  • They had this guy called Sebastian Coe set quite a few world records,

    セバスチャン・コーという男が世界記録を樹立したんだ

  • and ran at the ’80 and ’84 world Olympic games

    と80年と84年の世界オリンピックで走った

  • and he was sort of inspirational to me.

    彼は私にインスピレーションを与えてくれました。

  • Around that same time, I also fell in love with something called heavy metal music.

    同じ頃、私もヘビーメタルミュージックと呼ばれるものが好きになりました。

  • Now growing up in Sheffield there are a lot of rock bands you know, may it being a sort of slightly depressed grim, northern city,

    シェフィールドで育った今では、ロックバンドがたくさんいます。

  • but there was a lot of music and a lot of fun.

    が、音楽がたくさんあって楽しかったです。

  • So, fell in love with Porsche, doing some middle distance cross country running,

    ポルシェに恋をして中距離のクロスカントリーを走っています。

  • fell in love with heavy metal music,

    ヘビーメタル音楽に恋をした。

  • and I decided at the end of the 5th year I would leave school.

    と、5年目の最後に退学を決意しました。

  • I left school in 1982, basically with 2 O-Levels and no real future.

    私は1982年に学校を辞めましたが、基本的にはOレベルが2つあり、本当の意味での未来はありません。

  • By that time, I’d also figured out I could go drink in a pub.

    その頃には、居酒屋に飲みに行けることもわかっていた。

  • So for some reason that was great for going to clubs and having fun,

    だから、なぜかそれがクラブに行って楽しむのには最適だったんです。

  • but wasn’t so good for a middle-distance cross-country runner athlete.

    が、中距離クロスカントリーランナーのアスリートにはあまり向いていませんでした。

  • So that sort of faded away,

    だから、それが薄れていったんですね。

  • but there was the little thing that stuck with me was the passion and sort of the drive

    でも、ちょっとしたことですが、私の心に留まったのは、情熱と、ある種の原動力でした。

  • and I think till this day, those memorable moments from earlier on are still with me.

    そして今も昔の思い出が胸に残っているのだと思います。

  • I’m still running around, I’m still chasing around, I’m still running after my goal.

    まだまだ走り回っている、追いかけ回している、目標を追いかけている。

  • So, I bummed around on the dole for a little bit,

    だから、少しの間だけ、給料を貰いに行っていました。

  • doing our jobs and stuff like that.

    仕事をしているとか

  • And, uh, I started to hear this comment quite a lotcut your hair and get a real job.

    で、えーと、このコメントを結構聞くようになったんですよねー、髪を切ってちゃんとした仕事に就いて。

  • Well I was on the dole working construction, living at home, no car, taking the bus places.

    私は建設業で働いていた実家暮らしで車もなくバスで移動していた

  • And for a year or two, that was okay.

    そして、1、2年はそれでよかった。

  • By the time I turned 17 I decided okay,

    17歳になる頃には大丈夫だと決めていました。

  • I’m not gonna cut my hair, but maybe I should think about getting a job.

    髪は切らないけど、就職を考えた方がいいかも。

  • So I actually took a year longer in leisure and recreation study course sports management at a college.

    なので、実際に私は大学でレジャー・レクリエーション学習コースのスポーツマネジメントを1年延長して受講しました。

  • And I heard about this thing calledCamp America”. Well what was Camp America? I didn’t know,

    "キャンプ・アメリカ "というのを聞いたよキャンプ・アメリカって何だったの?私は知りませんでした。

  • But apparently Camp America sent kids to work at a summer camp in the United States of America.

    しかし、どうやらキャンプアメリカは、アメリカの夏のキャンプで働くために子供たちを送り込んだらしい。

  • Growing up as a kid, of course, I watched a lot of American TV.

    子供の頃に育った私は、もちろんアメリカのテレビをたくさん見ていました。

  • Most of the shows I loved centred around action and carsStarsky and Hutch, Dukes of Hazzard, CHiPs.

    私が好きだったショーのほとんどは、アクションや車を中心としたもので、スタースキーとハッチ、デュークス・オブ・ハザザード、CHiPsなどがありました。

  • So I had this American dream and it involved Evel Knievel .

    だから私はアメリカンドリームを持っていて、それはエベル・ケニーベルに関係していました。

  • And long story short I took a leap of faith and I applied to Camp America.

    そして長い話をすると、私は思い切ってキャンプ・アメリカに応募しました。

  • It was a little bit of a strange feeling, and I had these strange feelings in the past,

    ちょっとした違和感があって、昔はこういう違和感があったんです。

  • and somehow when my gut tells me to do something it generally is a good thing.

    そしてなぜか、私の直感が何かをするように言うとき、それは一般的に良いことだと思います。

  • Go on your gut feeling.

    あなたの直感に従ってください。

  • So by pure luck I suppose I was accepted into Camp America, got on a,

    運良くアメリカのキャンプに 受け入れられたんだと思う

  • a flight to New York, took a Trailways bus from New York,

    ニューヨークへのフライトで、ニューヨークからトレイルウェイズのバスに乗りました。

  • that’s the bus I took, to Detroit. Now Detroit was great, it was somewhat similar to Sheffield,

    それが私が乗ったデトロイト行きのバスだデトロイトは素晴らしかった シェフィールドに似ていた

  • former industrial city, also happened to the sort of, automotive hub of the United States.

    かつての工業都市は、また、米国の自動車のハブのようなものに起こった。

  • But I wasn’t in Detroit, I was

    でも、私はデトロイトにはいなかった。

  • 30 minutes north on a summer camp working with, in a city,

    夏合宿で北へ30分、都会で働きながら。

  • underprivileged kids, that happened to be from Detroit.

    恵まれない子供たちが、たまたまデトロイトから来たんだ

  • Now that was a big culture shock for me.

    今となっては、私にとっては大きなカルチャーショックでした。

  • Cuz you know, I’m this heavy metal guy from Sheffield, north of England,

    俺はイギリス北部のシェフィールドから来た ヘビーメタルの男だ

  • I’m sort of in the middle of nowhere,

    私は人里離れた場所にいるんだ

  • I had to adapt pretty quickly.

    私はかなり早く適応しなければなりませんでした。

  • So I adapted pretty quickly on this summer camp

    この夏のキャンプではすぐに適応した

  • and when that camp was over, I got back onto that Trailsway Bus,

    そのキャンプが終わった後、私はトレイルウェイバスに乗って帰ってきました。

  • and took that bus out west.

    バスに乗って西に向かった

  • I landed in Los Angeles, 1986, Union Station, 4am in the Morning.

    1986年、ロサンゼルスに降り立ったのは、ユニオン駅、朝の4時。

  • You know, I’d watch all those TV shows but I found myself being awakened on a park bench at 6am in the morning

    そんなテレビ番組ばっかり見てたけど、気がつけば朝6時に公園のベンチで起こされてた...。

  • by a LAPD guy who told me you can’t sleep here.

    ロス市警の男がここでは寝れないと言ってた

  • And I was sort of a little bit disappointed, I’ve seen all these shows in and around LA but where are all the beautiful people?

    LA周辺のショーは全部見てきたけど、綺麗な人たちはどこにいるんだろう?

  • Where are all the rock stars and movie stars?

    ロックスターや映画スターはどこにいるの?

  • That wasn’t happening in downtown LA.

    LAのダウンタウンでは、そんなことはなかった。

  • But quickly I found my way to Hollywood and uh, over the next couple of years,

    でもすぐにハリウッドへの道を見つけて数年後には...

  • you know, I sort of did a few odd jobs,

    ちょっとした仕事をしてたんだ

  • but there was one pivotal moment that happened within 3 days of being in Los Angeles.

    しかし、ロサンゼルスにいた3日以内に起こった重要な瞬間がありました。

  • Found myself at this YMCA hotel right off Hollywood Boulevard.

    ハリウッド大通りのYMCAホテルで見つけた

  • I went shopping on Hollywood Boulevard and I saw these great PVC Alligator Print pants are on sale for $9.99.

    私はハリウッド大通りで買い物に行って、私はこれらの偉大なPVCアリゲータープリントパンツが9.99ドルで販売されているのを見ました。

  • So I bought myself a pair but didn’t really fit good.

    なので、自分用に買ったのですが、あまりフィットしませんでした。

  • So went back to the youth hostel, bought a sewing kit and sewed them inside out,

    ユースホステルに戻って、ソーイングキットを買って、裏表を縫った。

  • and decide I’m going to go to the street that everyone was talking about called Melrose.

    メルローズと呼ばれる通りに行くことにしたの

  • So I ended up going down there to Melrose and walked into this shop that was called Retail Slut.

    結局メルローズまで行って、小売店の売春婦と呼ばれる店に入ったの。

  • It was a punk rock shop and there was a guy working there that was in a band called Faster Pussycat.

    パンクロックの店で、ファスター・プッシーキャットというバンドで働いていた人がいたんです。

  • His name was Taimie.

    彼の名前はタイミー。

  • Pivotal part to a story here.

    ここでの話の重要な部分。

  • Taimie says to me,

    タイミーが私に言う。

  • he realized I was from England, struck up a conversation,

    彼は私がイギリスから来たことに気付いて 会話を始めたの

  • and saidwhere did you get those pants from?”

    "そのパンツはどこで手に入れたの?"って

  • I said, “Hey,you know, I got them from England.”

    "イギリスから持ってきたんだ "と言ったんだ

  • I had to think quick on my feet.

    足で素早く考えなければならなかった。

  • I said, “Why? Do you want to buy them,” just sort of jokingly

    "何で? 買いたいの?"って冗談で言ったのよ

  • and he said, “Sure. Yeah, how much are they?”

    "確かに" "いくらだ?"って言ってた

  • So this point I hadn’t thought about selling these pants but I said first number that came to mind, 25 bucks.

    この時点ではこのパンツを売ることは考えていなかったが、最初に思い浮かんだ数字は25ドルと言った。

  • He said, “Okay. I’ll take eight piece.”

    "わかった、8個でいいよ "と言ってくれた。

  • So I ran right up to Hollywood Boulevard, bought eight pairs of pants,

    ハリウッド大通りまで走って行って8着のパンツを買ったんだ

  • went back down and sold them to him $15 profit per pant.

    下がっていって、彼に売ったのはパンツ一枚あたり15ドルの利益だった。

  • I realized in that one hour transaction, I’d made more straight away, literally within being in LA for three days,

    1時間の取引で気づいたんだが、文字通り3日間ロスにいた中で、もっとストレートに稼いでいたんだ。

  • than I made in a whole week working construction in England.

    イギリスで建設工事をしていた一週間で作ったものよりも

  • So I thought, oh, maybe LA is a place for me, seems pretty easy.

    だから思ったんだ、ああ、LAは僕にとっては簡単な場所だと思ったんだ。

  • They speak English, a lot of rock and roll.

    彼らは英語を話します、たくさんのロックンロール。

  • It was Guns N’ Roses, Motley Crue.

    ガンズ・アンド・ローゼズ、モトリー・クルーだった。

  • It was a great time over the next few years.

    数年越しの素晴らしい時間でした。

  • Fast-forward to 1989.

    1989年に早送りして

  • I’m selling second-hand clothing on the Boardwalk in Venice,

    ベニスのボードウォークで古着を売っています。

  • going to Yard sales, buying old Levi’s, cowboy boots, Western shirts.

    ヤードセールに行って、古いリーバイス、カウボーイブーツ、ウエスタンシャツを買う。

  • I am in the clothing industry now.

    今は服飾関係の仕事をしています。

  • Venice Beach back then was a major tourist attraction, lot of European people coming through.

    当時のベニスビーチは、ヨーロッパ人が多く訪れる観光名所でした。

  • And little by little this grew into a business, which became known as Serious Clothing

    そして、それが少しずつビジネスに発展していき、「本気のクロージング」として知られるようになりました。

  • and we ended up outfitting everyone from Alice Cooper to Madonna and everyone in between.

    アリス・クーパーからマドンナ、そしてその間のみんなに着せ替えをしたんだ。

  • We started wholesaling a small chain called Hot Topic.

    ホットトピックという小さなチェーン店の卸売を始めました。

  • Back then Hot Topic had five stores and would grow to over 500 stores.

    当時、ホットトピックは5つの店舗を持ち、500店舗以上にまで成長していました。

  • So we sort of went from making a little amount of clothing to making thousands of pieces of clothing.

    だから、少しの量の服を作っていたのが、何千着もの服を作るようになりました。

  • Well, in 1994, we realized being in Venice wasn’t so easy for a clothing company.

    1994年にヴェネツィアにある衣料品会社は簡単ではないと気付いた

  • We moved downtown and rented a loft in a warehouse for the next six years.

    ダウンタウンに引っ越して、倉庫のロフトを借りて6年。

  • Serious Clothing then started doing a lot of music videos

    真面目な服を着てから、たくさんのミュージックビデオを作るようになりました。

  • and also a lot of outfits for magazines and stylists who call in all the time.

    また、雑誌やスタイリストさんをいつも呼んでいる方のための衣装もたくさん。

  • Serious Clothing had its own unique style.

    真面目な服には独自のスタイルがあった。

  • We took fabrics that were not necessarily garment fabrics for use in car seat fabrics and made them into jackets and things like that.

    衣料用生地ではない生地を車のシート生地にして、ジャケットなどにしました。

  • Non-conventional materials thinking outside the box and basically doing what we like to wear.

    型にはまらない素材は箱の外で考えて、基本的には自分たちが好きなものを着ることをしています。

  • Well, by 2000, we realized we paid two people’s mortgages and we needed, hey, let’s buy our own building.

    2000年には、二人分の住宅ローンを払っていることに気付き、自分たちのビルを買おうということになったんです。

  • So we ended up finding this building.

    結局、この建物を見つけたんです。

  • Oh, that was me back then, forgot that little picture.

    ああ、あの頃の私だ、あの小さな写真を忘れていた。

  • So that was me pre-beard, that’s sort of circa 1994.

    それはヒゲを生やす前の私で1994年頃のようです。

  • Serious was one of the top 10 clothing companies to watch.

    シリアスは、注目の服飾メーカー10社の中でも上位にランクインしていました。

  • So anyway, 2000, my wife Karen found this building in the Arts District.

    とにかく、2000年、妻のカレンがこの建物を見つけたのは、芸術地区の中だった。

  • People said, “Youre crazy. No one wants to be there former desolate industrial area.”

    "狂っている "と言われた"誰も元荒涼とした工業地帯に 入りたがらない "と。

  • Well, long story short.

    まあ、長い話をすると

  • We took another leap of faith. It felt good in our gut feeling.

    私たちはもう一歩踏み出してみました。私たちの直感では良い感じでした。

  • Why were paying two people’s mortgages when we could own our own building?

    自分の建物を持てるのに なぜ二人分のローンを払うのか?

  • So we bought that building.

    その建物を買ったんですね。

  • About a year later, right after 9/11 in 2001,

    その約1年後、2001年の9.11の直後。

  • there was an article in the LA Times about lofter interpretation.

    LAタイムズにゆるい解釈の記事がありました。

  • We got a phone call, would we be interested in renting the building for a music video.

    電話があったんですが、ミュージックビデオのために建物を貸してもらえませんか?

  • Bang! Before you know it, were in the film location business.

    バン!いつの間にかロケ地ビジネスになっている。

  • Well, hey, weve been filming since 2001, over 100 days a year

    2001年から撮影を続けています 年間100日以上

  • doing things from low budget still shoots to big budget movies

    撮り鉄

  • and over a dozen reality shows like America’s Next Top Model.

    と、アメリカのネクストトップモデルのような十数本のリアリティ番組を見てきました。

  • So we met a lot of interesting people but we didn’t plan to build a film location.

    だから、面白い人たちにはたくさん会えたけど、ロケ地を作る予定はなかった。

  • We were building our dream, live, work house,

    私たちは、夢の家、住む家、働く家を建てていました。

  • where we lived upstairs and operated our clothing company out of downstairs.

    上の階に住んでいて、下の階から服飾会社を運営していました。

  • So we’d accidentally fallen into another somewhat lucrative business.

    偶然にも別の儲かるビジネスに 巻き込まれてしまったんだ

  • This is LA. It’s movie town.

    ここはLA。映画の街だ

  • Weve met quite a lot of interesting people.

    かなりの数の面白い方にお会いしてきました。

  • They always say, “How did you get here?”

    "どうやってここに来たの?"って言われるんだよ

  • Well, we tell them, “We followed our gut feeling.”

    "直感に従った "って言うんだよ

  • So remember that little story, I was a ten-year-old when I fell in love with Porsche.

    だから、10歳の時にポルシェに恋をした小話を思い出してください。

  • So fell in love with Porsche as a ten-year-old,

    10歳の頃にポルシェに恋をしたんですね。

  • I didn’t buy my first Porsche till 1992.

    初めてのポルシェは1992年まで買わなかった。

  • Serious Clothing had become quite successful from ‘92 to 2000.

    92年から2000年にかけて、真剣勝負服はかなりの成功を収めていた。

  • I was racing around and getting quite a lot of speeding tickets.

    レースをしていて、かなりの数のスピード違反切符を切られていました。

  • 2001, I took my aggressive street driving to the track and joined the Porsche Owners Club.

    2001年、アグレッシブなストリートドライビングでサーキットに挑み、ポルシェオーナーズクラブに入会しました。

  • I went through their program, learned how to do club racing, instructing

    私は彼らのプログラムに参加して、クラブレースのやり方を学びました。

  • and for the next five years, was doing 50 track days a year.

    そして次の5年間は、年間50日のトラックをこなしていました。

  • Turn around to probably 2008, 2009, I spent a lot of money raising an decided, okay, my next passion:

    振り返ってみると、おそらく2008年、2009年に、私は多くのお金を費やして、私は決定した、大丈夫、私の次の情熱を育てました。

  • I love these cars.

    私はこの車が大好きです。

  • Why don’t I try to restore a few of them?

    何個か復元してみてはどうでしょうか?

  • Well, I didn’t’ have no mechanical background but I had passion.

    機械的なバックグラウンドがないわけではありませんでしたが、情熱はありました。

  • I often talk about passion goes a long, long way.

    私はよく、情熱は長い長い道のりを行くという話をします。

  • You know, if youve got the will and the desire and put the motivation and a focus, things tend to happen.

    意志と願望があって、やる気と集中力を置くと、物事は起こりがちですよね。

  • Also a little bit of luck and a leap of faith really help out as well.

    また、少しの運と信仰の跳躍も本当に同様に助けてくれます。

  • But I asked a lot of questions and I started restoring a couple of cars.

    でも、いろいろ質問して、何台かの車をレストアするようになりました。

  • So I got a little bit of interest in European car magazines and I started this blog online.

    そこで、少しだけ欧州車雑誌に興味を持ち、ネットでこのブログを始めました。

  • Well, there is a thread on the Porsche forum called Pelican parts.

    さて、ポルシェフォーラムにはペリカンパーツというスレッドがあります。

  • And I called my blog Porsche Collection Out Of Control Hobby.

    そして、私はブログのことをポルシェコレクションアウトオブコントロールホビーと呼んでいます。

  • And I was sort of like a catch-all of what I was doing.

    そして、自分のやっていることのキャッチボールのようなものでした。

  • And so this was sort of going to become a pivotal point where it was like something I really really enjoyed to do.

    だから、これは私が本当に楽しんでやっていたことのような、重要なポイントになりそうな気がしました。

  • And I’d start restoring these cars.

    そして、私はこれらの車の修復を開始します。

  • Well, about two years ago, a pivotal moment in our life happened again.

    約2年前、人生の重要な瞬間がまた起こった。

  • Weve seen sort of about these every 10 years,

    10年ごとに見てきました。

  • these pivotal moments that seem to happen by accident, or theyre just naturally evolving.

    偶然に起こったように見える重要な瞬間や、自然に進化していく瞬間があります。

  • We never had this five, ten year planned business model.

    この5年、10年計画のビジネスモデルはありませんでした。

  • Always go back to: follow your gut; do want you love to do.

    常に次のことに戻ります:自分の直感に従うこと、好きなことをすること。

  • So I haven’t been in the film industry.

    だから映画業界には入ったことがない。

  • Weve got quite a lot of people interested in making little TV shows and stuff like that

    ちょっとしたテレビ番組を作りたいとか、そういうのに興味を持っている人は結構いるんですよね。

  • but we weren’t quite ready for the exposure or the compatibility wasn’t’ quite right or it just didn’t click.

    しかし、露出の準備ができていなかったり、相性が悪かったり、クリック感がなかったりしていました。

  • So I got a call from this Canadian called Tamir Moscovici.

    カナダ人のタミール・モスコビッチから電話があったの

  • Well, he’d seen a couple of articles and he was a film director, also a Porsche guy.

    まあ、彼は何度か記事を見ていて、映画監督でもあり、ポルシェの人でもありました。

  • And he was looking for something edgy for his reel.

    彼は自分のリールに何かエッジの効いたものを探していました。

  • He was sort of sick of doing Bud Light commercials and figured,

    彼はバドライトのCMをやるのにうんざりしていて、考えたんです。

  • hey, maybe there’s more of the Magnusstory that meets the eye.

    マグナスの話はもっとあるかもしれない

  • So we had a couple of conversations and Tamir ended up flying down to LA,

    それで2、3の会話をして、タミールはLAに飛んで行ってしまった。

  • little over two years ago on his frequent flyer miles, a complete leap of faith.

    2年以上前に、彼のマイレージのマイルで、完全な信仰の飛躍。

  • His original idea was to make a short YouTube documentary.

    彼の元々のアイデアは、短いYouTubeのドキュメンタリーを作ることでした。

  • Well, our goal was what’s the worst it could happen here,

    ここで起こりうる最悪の事態を 想定していました

  • were going to drive around, race around to my favorite Porsches for four days,

    私たちは4日間、大好きなポルシェのためにドライブしたり、レースをしたりして回ります。

  • maybe get some good footage out of it.

    いい映像が撮れるかもしれない

  • Well, what turned out to be a 32-minute documentary was shot over four days.

    さて、32分のドキュメンタリーとなったのは、4日間に渡って撮影されたものです。

  • So we shot I think in February of 2012 and we released a trailer in June of 2012.

    2012年の2月に撮影を行い、2012年の6月に予告編を公開しました。

  • That first day, we didn’t know what would happen with the trailer but somehow it got picked up by Top Gear within the first day.

    その初日は、トレーラーがどうなるかわからなかったのですが、なぜか初日のうちにトップギアに拾われてしまいました。

  • It got over 50,000 views and all of a sudden, I’d just found this thing called Facebook.

    5万回以上再生されて、突然、Facebookというものを見つけました。

  • I figured maybe I should get on that.

    それに乗るべきだと思ったんだ

  • I didn’t really know much about it.

    あまり詳しくは知りませんでした。

  • So anyway, I got on Facebook and this time I don’t even have an iPhone,

    で、とにかくフェイスブックに乗ったんですが、今回はiPhoneすら持っていません。

  • so I’m not really internet savvy but all of a sudden,

    私はインターネットに疎いんだけど、突然だよ。